Engaging & Teaching Adults

READING LIST

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POWER POINTS

EFFECTIVE PRESENTATIONS

TEMPLATES

We currently do not have peer-nominated and reviewed resources for this category. Feel free to suggest a resource for peer review.

EXAMPLES

A COMPARISON OF STUDENT LEARNING SUCCESS FOR TURFGRASS MANAGEMENT AND DIAGNOSTICS: TRADITIONAL PROGRAM DELIVERY VERSUS THE FLIPPED CLASSROOM APPROACH

    • O’Connor, Allison. Poster presented at: Extension Master Gardener National Coordinators’ Conference; 2018 August 6-10; Madison, WI
      • Home lawn questions rank first or second for all questions addressed by Colorado Master Gardener volunteers. Compared to other gardening areas, confidence in ability to answer turf questions and diagnose lawn problems is a concern expressed by volunteers. In an effort to enhance volunteer confidence, lawn management and diagnostics was taught using two methods in 2018. One approach (5 counties) used the traditional 6-hour lecture during which basic information was presented, with time allowed for questions. The second approach (7 counties) used the flipped classroom method, where students were expected to master basic turf management information prior to class and class time was used to address real-life client scenarios that might be encountered during volunteer work with the public. Scenarios were discussed first in small groups and then with the entire class by the instructor. Pre- and post-testing of basic turf management knowledge showed a 40% increase in knowledge gained, independent of teaching method. We are in the process of assessing differences (for the two teaching methods) in confidence level for volunteer ability to diagnose turf problems. (2019)
EMGCC O'Connor Small Koski 2018.pdf

ADOPT-A-FAMILY: MATCHING SMALL-SCALE GROWERS WITH FAMILIES IN NEED

    • Garland, Kate. Poster presented at: Extension Master Gardener National Coordinators’ Conference; 2018 August 6-10; Madison, WI
      • A pilot program based on the Christmas is for Kids model was launched in 2017 to help connect home gardeners with specific households being served by Maine Families, a home visiting program serving households with children from birth to age 3. Five families were asked to create a small wish list of produce items they’d like to receive. Small-scale growers, who often feel the volume of produce they’re able to donate isn’t large enough to make a difference at a food pantry or shelter, were given the opportunity to adopt a family for the season. Maine Families staff distributed produce donations, Extension recipes and food handling tips. Donors reported that they were more likely to drop off small volumes of produce that would normally go to waste because they knew the food would be used and appreciated. On average, the donors made 12 deliveries/family this season with donations totaling over 625lbs. Families reported more eating fruits and vegetables, trying new recipes, at least one family member trying a new fruit or vegetable, and improved food security. (2019)


517209_HarvestHunger_Rev.indd Katherine Garland.pdf

ADULT LEARNING MYTHBUSTERS

    • Immendorf, Molly. Oral presentation at: Extension Master Gardener National Coordinators’ Conference; 2018 August 6-10; Madison, WI https://youtu.be/yy3UI9DlSTM
      • Have fun while testing your knowledge of how adults learn (hey, you are one, right?) while reflecting on your Extension Master Gardener Coordinator conference experience. Explore some of the pervasive myths about how people learn. Be ready for some friendly competition with your fellow conference attendees – form teams, take the challenge solo, it’s up to you! (2019)

COMBINING ON-LINE AND HANDS-ON EDUCATION FOR SUCCESSFUL EMG TRAININGS

    • Freeborn, John, and David Close Virginia Tech University. Oral presentation at: Extension Master Gardener National Coordinators’ Conference; 2018 August 6-10; Madison, WI. https://youtu.be/U4aVvsbwjZE
      • We all know the problem of “garden myths” – ideas or trends that don’t have research supporting them. What can we do with these ideas? How can we engage in discussion with these ideas, while maintaining a dedication to integrity? How can we balance the credibility of research with a respect for differing worldviews and diversity? And what is the role of the educator? Using educational research on learning theory, we will discuss why examining topics that spark heated debate (and where biases are strong-willed, perhaps) can be really good education – if approached using a little strategy. I will share an example of an activity that helps break down our understanding of controversial issues in horticulture and gardening, as well as how conversations in this activity unfolded during Master Gardener training. (2019)

DESK CLINIC TRAINING CLASSES AS A MEANS TO BOOST MASTER GARDENER CONFIDENCE

    • Stoven, Heather. Poster presented at: Extension Master Gardener National Coordinators’ Conference; 2018 August 6-10; Madison, WI.
      • Volunteering at a clinic desk is one of the most important tasks Master Gardeners engage in due to their direct interaction with the public when responding to their gardening inquiries. Unfortunately, Master Gardeners often feel uncomfortable performing this task, especially as trainees. Due to concern amongst Master Gardeners over a lack of confidence in working at the Extension office desk clinic, a training program was implemented in 2016 in Yamhill County Oregon. The training program developed is comprised of five classes, each two hours in duration. The course material includes training about clinic procedures, office equipment and practice with plant problem scenarios. The classes are well attended by trainees, with voluntary attendance over 80% each year. A 2017 survey of trainee class attendees showed a 55% increase in confidence in working the desk and all respondents agreed or strongly agreed that the desk classes were valuable training. (2019)

EMBRACING CONTROVERSIAL ISSUES IN MASTER GARDENER TRAINING

    • Sager, Michelle. Oral presentation at: Extension Master Gardener National Coordinators’ Conference; 2018 August 6-10; Madison, WI. https://youtu.be/01xuCf_Adbw
      • We all know the problem of “garden myths” – ideas or trends that don’t have research supporting them. What can we do with these ideas? How can we engage in discussion with these ideas, while maintaining a dedication to integrity? How can we balance the credibility of research with a respect for differing worldviews and diversity? And what is the role of the educator? Using educational research on learning theory, we will discuss why examining topics that spark heated debate (and where biases are strong-willed, perhaps) can be really good education – if approached using a little strategy. I will share an example of an activity that helps break down our understanding of controversial issues in horticulture and gardening, as well as how conversations in this activity unfolded during Master Gardener training. (2019)

LAWN CHAIR LEARNING

    • Hilinske-Christensen, Jeanne. Poster presented at: Extension Master Gardener National Coordinators’ Conference; 2018 August 6-10; Madison, WI
      • A pilot program based on the Christmas is for Kids model was launched in 2017 to help connect home gardeners with specific households being served by Maine Families, a home visiting program serving households with children from birth to age 3. Five families were asked to create a small wish list of produce items they’d like to receive. Small-scale growers, who often feel the volume of produce they’re able to donate isn’t large enough to make a difference at a food pantry or shelter, were given the opportunity to adopt a family for the season. Maine Families staff distributed produce donations, Extension recipes and food handling tips. Donors reported that they were more likely to drop off small volumes of produce that would normally go to waste because they knew the food would be used and appreciated. On average, the donors made 12 deliveries/family this season with donations totaling over 625lbs. Families reported more eating fruits and vegetables, trying new recipes, at least one family member trying a new fruit or vegetable, and improved food security. (2019)

MAKE YOUR TRAINING PROGRAMS FUN!

    • Bennett, Pam, The Ohio State University. Oral presentation at: Extension Master Gardener National Coordinators’ Conference; 2018 August 6-10; Madison, WI. https://youtu.be/8k07w3HoiX0
      • Lecture is a bad word and a three hour death by PowerPoint lecture is worse than purgatory! Extension Master Gardeners love to learn and are motivated to learn. Capture this excitement by involving them in teaching the class – and make your life easier. During this session, you will learn how to take a three-hour session on any horticulture topic and turn it into a fun class that encourages learning and teamwork. EMGs are involved in the teaching along with guidance from you, the expert on the topic. Not only do they learn, but they begin to meet others in the class and develop a bond with their peers. In addition, there will be open discussion regarding teaching techniques that work (and are fun for the learner). (2019)

USING THE HORTICULTURE CONTINUUM OF LEARNING TO BUILD COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT TOOLKITS FOR VOLUNTEER EDUCATIONAL OUTREACH

    • Marsden, Christy. Oral presentation at: Extension Master Gardener National Coordinators’ Conference; 2018 August 6-10; Madison, WI. https://youtu.be/4pFdI1tHSw8
      • Using the Horticultural Continuum of Learning, the Minnesota Master Gardener Volunteer Program state leadership team is developing capacity in volunteers to work within their communities through the creation of Community Engagement Tool-kits. Using the Continuum, educational materials are created to meet a variety of audience levels and methods of outreach. For example, materials are created to bring awareness to the content, such as buttons and flyers. To continue building interest, Master Gardeners can use specially created brochures, flyers, handouts, fact sheets, and walk-by interpretive signage for gardens. For knowledgeable audiences, volunteers can teach a class with a prepared presentation, handouts, or activities. Not only do these materials reach new and different audiences through a variety of methodologies, but encourage volunteers to consider their educational efforts in a different capacity to reach non-traditional audiences. To facilitate in this, tool-kits are packaged to match common methods of volunteer outreach, such as planting gardens, setting up tables, or direct education. (2019)

UTILIZING EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING GARDENS TO ENHANCE THE MAUI MASTER GARDENER TRAINING COURSE

    • Nazario-Leary, Cynthia. Oral presentation at: Extension Master Gardener National Coordinators’ Conference; 2018 August 6-10; Madison, WI. https://youtu.be/nQRbkMwYXxk
      • The Maui Master Gardener training course utilizes an Experiential Learning Garden (ELG) to provide hands-on learning opportunities for Master Gardener Trainees. The ELG is used to strengthen and enhance delivery of course content and techniques such as pest and disease ID, introduction to new vegetables and plant combinations, and management and harvest strategies. 75% of trainees said their horticultural knowledge and skills increased after working in the ELG. 65% of trainees said they applied knowledge learned in class to their ELG. (2019)