Diversity & Inclusion

READING LIST

CREATING SAFE SPACES WITHIN EXTENSION PROGRAMS

DIVERSIFYING THE VOLUNTEER BASE: LATINOS AND VOLUNTEERISM

    • Hobbs, B. B. (2001). Diversifying the volunteer base: Latinos and volunteerism. Journal of Extension [On-line] (39)4. Article 4FEA1.
      • Reviewers noted that the article was fairly general, and limited to a small focus group (18 individuals in one state). While one reviewer noted that the article was relevant for diversifying the EMG volunteer base, another noted that it may be difficult for Extension to easily carry out some of the suggestions given in this article (e.g. having bilingual and bi-cultural staff; providing transportation or child care for volunteers). However, states may be able to use the information in this article to begin to change their Extension culture, to better reach out to under-served audiences. (2014)

FROM TRANSLATION TO CULTURAL RESPONSIVENESS: A GARDEN PROGRAM'S EVOLUTION IN UNDERSTANDING EDUCATOR'S PERCEPTIONS OF SPANISH-LANGUAGE RESOURCES

VOLUNTEERING IN LOW-INCOME COMMUNITIES OF COLOR: CHALLENGES FOR URBAN MASTER GARDENERS

    • Eichberger et al. 2014. Volunteering in low-income communities of color: challenges for urban Master Gardeners. Food Justice. volume 19: 18-21.
      • Food Justice is published by the American Community Gardening Association. This excellent article starts on page 18 of volume 19. (2014)

POWER POINTS

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TEMPLATES

We currently do not have peer-nominated and reviewed resources for this category. Feel free to suggest a resource for peer review.

EXAMPLES

BEYOND RACE: DIVERSITY AND INCLUSION AS THE ENGINE OF OPPORTUNITY

  • Artis, Laura. Oral presentation at: Extension Master Gardener National Coordinators’ Conference; 2018 August 6-10; Madison, WI. https://zoom.us/recording/play/3glya7j3dP_H3jXLguy86LAoq4ys86dO5sL_cSNRlaZUhTg09BLJOFI5E4HbQdac?startTime=1533736851000
    • Exploring diversity constructs and how such efforts incorporate inclusive mindsets for tomorrow’s evolving population. Understanding how measurements of compliance create access and opportunities for broad conversations and act as a change agent for the 21st Century. Discoveries of national findings and highlighting state’s organizational effectiveness to ensure the implementation of insightful educational exchanges. How do we strategically design a model Master Gardener Program through collaborative discussions, implementing change, yield parity in programs for all demographics and expand outreach for measurable results? Individuals will have the opportunity to engage such conversations with panelist to isolate the fundamentals challenges of program participant’s and what advisory approaches facilitate strategic planning. (2019)

DEVELOPING PROGRAM PRIORITY TOPICS AND STRATEGIC PLAN TO EXPAND VOLUNTEER BASE

  • Kenny, Tim . Oral presentation at: Extension Master Gardener National Coordinators’ Conference; 2018 August 6-10; Madison, WI. recording not available
    • Through an audience analysis, the Minnesota program developed a new set of program content priorities that are relevant to issues of our time including pollinators, local food, clean water, climate, and more. Concurrently, a new volunteer-centric 5 year strategic plan was developed, vetted with stakeholders, and is ready for implementation. Together, these change initiatives are being used to communicate to and encourage a diverse audience of new volunteers to the program. They will also serve as tools to reach out to intended audiences in new and engaging ways. (2019)

ENGAGING MILLENNIALS

  • Futa, Ben, and Meliska, Elin . Oral presentation at: Extension Master Gardener National Coordinators’ Conference; 2018 August 6-10; Madison, WI. https://youtu.be/chjR-pfZ1Zk.
    • Engaging new audiences is a constant and evolving challenge. Audiences are more diverse in their interests, tastes, and preferences when it comes to how they invest their time and money, and this presents a unique challenge for inspiring new audiences to care about horticulture. Discover how Allen Centennial Garden is actively developing strategies for engaging with nontraditional gardening audiences, particularly young adults. (2019)

INCLUSIVE IDEAS

  • Freidig, Amy . Oral presentation at: Extension Master Gardener National Coordinators’ Conference; 2018 August 6-10; Madison, WI. https://youtu.be/chjR-pfZ1Zk
    • (2019)

INCLUSIVE MASTER GARDENER PROGRAM

  • DeBlieck, Susan, and Dalicia Davis. Oral presentation at: Extension Master Gardener National Coordinators’ Conference; 2018 August 6-10; Madison, WI.at https://youtu.be/pZ851uAYV_w
    • A conversation about increasing the reach of the EMG program to increase inclusivity. Based on research, the average Iowa Master Gardener is graduate-degree, middle-income, retired, white female. How can we change the MG training and our definition of volunteerism to expand the program to include people of color? How can we change the program to increase access to the program for people experiencing low-income? (2019)

LOCATION, LOCATION, LOCATION: VOLUNTEER DIVERSITY DRIVING PROGRAM DEVELOPMENT

  • Zientek, Jan. Oral presentation at: Extension Master Gardener National Coordinators’ Conference; 2018 August 6-10; Madison, WI. https://youtu.be/z5PjRIilxJw.
    • In 2001 the Rutgers Master Gardener program (96% white women above the age of 65) hardly reflected the population of Essex County (9% white, 52% female and 11.5% older than 65.) Volunteer demographics began to influence who was being served by Rutgers Cooperative Extension such that in 2003 very little programming was offered in the urban communities of the county. We worked to recruit volunteers from underserved communities, offered scholarships, provided transportation with modest success: non-white participation in the program increasing to 10% of active volunteers by 2005. Beginning in 2010 the location of the training program alternated between the suburbs and Newark, the largest city in the county, and student diversity increased to 20-25%. With a more diverse volunteer population we are offering a wider variety of programs, reaching a wider audience within the county, especially in poorer, underserved communities and increasing volunteer engagement, and an unexpected outcome – increased county funding. (2019)