The healing process

The Bible is a spiritual resource for healing and health because it is our compass for life. It is also a great source of personal comfort, strength, and power. The pages of Scripture can sustain and thus bring healing to people in the face of physical and emotional maladies.

Continued discernment in healing prayer:
  1. Tell God how you feel, as honestly as you can. Take a lesson from the Psalms. If you doubt that God is paying attention, say so. If you are depressed, confused, worried, sick of being sick, admit it. This step is important, one often skipped by Christians who want to keep everything "nice."
  2. Invite God into all of your brokenness. Ask God to heal you and to show you what to pray for.
  3. Then stop talking, even in your head, and simply sit in God's presence, with the expectation that God will work in some way.
  4. Pay attention to what happens in the silence. What images, thoughts, memories come to you? What desires? What emerges as an action you should take?
  5. You might want to imagine Jesus with you. What does He say to you? What does He do?
  6. You may sense how you are to pray. Maybe it's about a memory that came up during the silence. Ask God how this memory is related to your healing.
  7. If nothing occurs to you after you have asked God for discernment, don't be discouraged. Keep asking, and remember that God speaks in many ways. Be open to God's voice and action, your reading of the Bible and other books, phone calls you receive, events in your life, and so on.
  8. Trust that if your discernment is off the mark, the Holy Spirit will correct you. Simply remain as open as possible and act in faith on whatever discernment you receive.
  9. If you draw a blank in this process you can still pray. You might say, "Lord, I don't know how you want to heal me, but I know you are a God of love and compassion. Please heal me in the way that is best for me."
Adapted from Stretch Out Your Hand: Exploring Healing Prayer by Tilda Norberg and Robert Webber, Upper Room Press, 1999, pages 39 and 40.
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