U.S. History 9‎ > ‎

US 9 Syllabus

                                  Part I

1) Class Identification
    - United States History (9); two semesters of US History are required.
       Most WHS students take this class during their freshman year
     - US History 9 meets in Room 1005, in Pod 1000
       - 1st Semester US 9 meets during Periods 1, 4, 5, and 7
     - US History 9 Webpage

2) Teacher: Dan Jensen
    - E-mail: dan.jensen@district145.org
     - My Weebly WHS Website (featuring my U.S. History Blog)

3) Class Description
    - US History 9 is a survey class, beginning with the Reconstruction Era
       after the Civil War, and ending with 9/11
     - Semester 1: Post-Civil War thru WW II
         Unit 1: Post-Civil War Era
         Unit 2: Progressivism, Imperialism, 
& the Great War
         Unit 3: Post-WW I Era
         Unit 4: The Great Depression & World War II
     - Semester 2: Post-WW II thru 9/11
         Unit 5: Post-World War II
         Unit 6: The Civil Rights Era
         Unit 7: The Vietnam Era
         Unit 8: The 1970s & Beyond
     - District #145 K-12 Social Studies Frameworks
     - District #145 K-12 Social Studies Mission

4) Class Policies
       - Contained in the above link:
          - Formative grades, Summative grades, Semester Final Exam
          - No Re-Takes - The "Replacement System" is far superior
       - Assignment Deadlines:
        - We will follow the WHS "Student Support Process" for our major assignments
        - If a student misses a deadline, he/she needs to fill out a "Missing Work" 
          document for my files . . 
        - If the student follows up with me before the end of school the following day,
          as in turning in the assignment, all is right in the world . . .
        - If a student DOES NOT turn in the assignment in that window of time, per
          school policy, I refer the student to the administration, and I'll contact the
          student's household by e-mail.
        - If a student decides that deadlines aren't really for them, but for others, then
          such reminders as lunch detentions, mini-visits w/ me before or after school,
          or even the extremes of "After Hours" on Wednesday, or "Saturday School"
          will be in play . . .
        - My advice: If you can't meet the deadline, it's far better if you let me know
          why, and we can take it from there . . . 
     - "Exits":
        - Each student has 3 "Exits" from class each semester (e.g. restroom, 
          locker, drink, etc.)
        - Students that have exercised poor judgment over time, and 
           exceed their 3 "exits", are subject to administrative referral
     - Tardies:
        - 1st Tardy: Warning
        - 2nd Tardy: 15 minute detention w/ teacher to be served within 3 days
        - 3rd Tardy & Beyond: Office referral
     - In essence there is one over-arching policy for this class: Avoid
        interfering with someone else's education . . .


                                       Part II

5) Class Materials
    - This is a high school history class, so each student is expected to have
        their notebook and something to write with each and every single day;
        think of it as a  "Daily Informal Maturity Test"
     - Textbooks will be used in class under my direction; if a student will have
        an extended absence, I can easily arrange online access for the textbook

6) Learning Strategies
    - Processing information in class, whether from lecture, reading, video,
        photograph, political cartoon, small-group discussions, etc., is paramount
     - Effective note-taking, and review of the notes when needed (e.g. assessments)
     - Take advantage of the online reviews for the objective summative
       assessments on Angel; students can preview the Beginning, Progressing,
       and Proficient level questions in advance of the assessment, if they
       so choose, that is . . . (Advanced level questions are not previewed)
     - Analyzing Primary Source Documents like an amateur historian
     - Answer the most crucial question in the history-of-history: WHY . . .
       - Of course, in order to answer the "Why", students also need the
         necessary background of "Who", "How", and "What", among other things

7) Requirements
    - In hard-measurement terms, in order to pass US History 9, a student
       needs achieve a percentage grade of at least 70%
         - According to our School Board Policy, the grading brackets are . . . 
              - "A" (94-100) / "B" (86-93) / "C" (78-85) / "D" (70-77)
     - Since 70% of a student's grade is in the "Summative" realm, students
        will need to develop proficiency in:
          a) Objective Assessments, especially being able to successfully
               answer the easiest questions, which actually are worth the most
               points: The Beginning and Progressing Level Questions
               ** The main reason why I feature objective assessments is to help
                    students increase their study skills
          b) Analyzing Primary Source Documents, in terms of:
               - "Sourcing" (Analyzing the source information of a document)
               - "Header" (What is the main focus of the document?)
               - "Annotating" (Finding relevant information in the document itself)
               - "Guiding Questions" (Answering questions related to the documents)
               - "Final Answer" (Writing an insightful response to the "Framing
                   Question" - e.g. What Caused the Pullman Strike of 1894?)
     - Attendance: As with any class, consistent attendance can only increase
          the chances of success; repeated absences can only minimize those
          chances
     - All of the above, and more, are key in helping a student increase their
           human capital, which is something they can use and take with them
           the rest of their lives . . . so, when someone asks me WHY IS
           HISTORY IMPORTANT, my answer is: History is a great 
           vehicle for everyone, in that you can increase your brain-
           power, but you also learn from the successes and failures of 
           historical figures, which, if you are diligent, can apply those
           lessons to your life, and be very successful
Ċ
Dan Jensen,
Aug 10, 2013, 10:21 AM
Ċ
Dan Jensen,
Aug 10, 2013, 10:20 AM
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