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Academic Planning Guide
2018-2019




AP Classes

ThunderRidge High School Advanced Placement Course Descriptions 

If you are thinking about taking one or more AP courses, we can help answer the question “Why AP?” 

The key to college success can be linked to whether students used their high school years to take advanced courses.  Further, a US Department of Education study found that the strongest predictor of college graduation is participation in rigorous, college-level courses while still in high school—and AP courses in particular.

AP provides students with the experiences, strategies, skills, and habits of mind to help them be successful in post-secondary pursuits.

An added benefit of taking AP courses is that academic performance in college prep courses such as AP has been consistently rated as the top factor in admission decisions in recent NACAC Admission Trends Surveys.

Advanced Placement courses allow students to take the challenge of college-level courses while in the familiar surroundings of their high school.  AP courses develop advanced reading, writing, and thinking skills that benefit students in their post-secondary pursuits.  These courses require work outside the classroom, during summer and breaks.  Students should consider their academic, social, work, and extra-curricular activities before undertaking the commitment of an Advanced Placement course.  Students will not be allowed to drop an AP course after they have signed up and courses are scheduled.

Prepare yourself now for college success—Register for AP!



T
hunderRidge High School AP course descriptions for 2016-17

Advanced Placement Biology - 80365S1 and 80365S2

Credit:  1.0
Grades:  11-12
Prerequisites:  “C” or better in Biology and Chemistry or concurrently taking Chemistry
Expenses: 
There will be a $6 goggle recovery fee and a $4 
dissection fee charged for this class.  It is highly recommended that students purchase an AP textbook (approximately $100.00).

AP Exam:  Students enrolled in the course are expected to take the National AP Exam in May (approximately $93).

This course is the equivalent of a full-year, laboratory-based introductory Biology course for majors at the university level.  The curriculum is designed to prepare students for the National Advanced Placement exam held in May, which students may take to receive college credit.  Students electing to enroll in AP Biology should be highly motivated, desire a significant academic challenge, and be seriously interested in studying biological science at an advanced level. 

Major topics covered will include:  (1) Scientific Methodology, (2) Biological Molecules, (3) Chemistry of Life, (4) Cellular Organization, (5) Bioenergetics, (6) Heredity, (7) Molecular Biology, (8) Evolutionary Biology, (9) Diversity and Taxonomy, (10) Structure and Function of Plants, (11) Structure and Function of Animals, and (12) Ecology.  Approximately 40% of the course will be laboratory-based, and students will be expected to keep laboratory journals and produce college-level laboratory reports throughout the year.

This is a one-year course; students may not drop at semester.  


Advanced Placement Chemistry - 80400S1 and 80400S2

Credit: 1.0
Grades: 11-12
Prerequisite: “C” grade or better in both semesters of Chemistry and Algebra II, a passing grade in Physical Science and Biology
Expenses: T
here will be a $6 goggle recovery fee charged for this class.  It is highly recommended students purchase an AP textbook (approximately $100), and a periodic table ($0.50). 
AP Exam:  Students enrolled in the course are expected to take the National AP Exam in May (approximately $93).

This course is the equivalent of a full-year, laboratory-based introductory Chemistry course for majors at the university level.  The curriculum is designed to prepare students for the National Advanced Placement exam held in May, which students may take to receive college credit.  Students electing to enroll in AP Chemistry should be highly motivated, desire a significant academic challenge, and be seriously interested in studying physical and biological sciences at an advanced level. All traditional, general chemistry topics such as stoichiometry, gases bonding, kinetics, equilibrium acids and bases, thermochemistry, electrochemistry, organic chemistry and nuclear chemistry will be explored in greater depth and breadth than in a non-AP Chemistry course.

This is a one-year course; students may not drop at semester.    


Advanced Placement Environmental Science - 
80370S1 and 80370S2

Credit:  1.0
Grades: 10-12
Prerequisites: 
Successful completion of one year of life science and a minimum of Algebra I; completion of Chemistry is also highly recommended.
Expenses:  It is highly recommended that students purchase an AP textbook (approximately $100). 
AP Exam:  Students enrolled in the course are expected to take the National AP Exam in May (approximately $93).

This course will provide students with the scientific principles, concepts, and methodologies required to understand the interrelationships of the natural world, to identify and analyze environmental problems both natural and human-made, to evaluate the relative risks associated with these problems, and to examine alternative solutions for resolving and/or preventing them.

Students will not be allowed to drop an AP course after they have signed up and courses are scheduled. This is a one-year course; students may not drop at semester. 

Advanced Placement Physics C - 80655S1 and 80655S2

Credit: 1.0
Grade: 10 – 12
Prerequisites: Concurrent enrollment in or completion of AB or BC Calculus
Expenses:  It is highly recommended that students purchase an AP textbook (approximately $100.00).
AP Exam:  Students enrolled in the course are expected to take the National AP Exam in May (approximately $93).

This course covers the motion of particles, forces, work, energy, collisions, rotation, rolling, torque, angular momentum, gravitation, and oscillations.  These topics will be studied at the college freshman, science major, level.  Calculus will be used as the mathematical language and problem solving tool.  Upon completing the course work students will have the opportunity to take the AP Physics C Mechanics Exam.  The exam is equivalent to a first semester college exam for engineering or science majors.

This is a one-year course; students may not drop at semester.   


Advanced Placement Physics I: Algebra based - 80656S1 and 80656S2


Credit: 1.0
Grades:  11-12
Prerequisites:  Concurrent enrollment in Algebra II/Trig or higher

Expenses:  It is highly recommended that students purchase an AP textbook (approximately $100.00).

AP Exam:  Students enrolled in the course are expected to take the National AP Exam in May (approximately $93).


AP Physics 1: Algebra-Based is the equivalent to a first-semester college course in algebra-based physics. The course covers Newtonian mechanics (including rotational dynamics and angular momentum); work, energy, and power; mechanical waves and sound. It will also introduce electric circuits.

This is a one-year course; students may not drop at semester.    

Advanced Placement Statistics - 60801S1 and 60801S2

Credit: 1.0
Grade:  11-12
Prerequisite: "C" or better in Algebra II or higher
Expenses:  Students are required to purchase an AP textbook and a graphing calculator (TI84).
AP Exam:  Students enrolled in the course are expected to take the National AP Exam in May (approximately $93).

AP Statistics is a college level class that provides students the opportunity to earn college credit by passing the AP Statistics Exam.  Topics presented include: exploratory analysis of data making use of graphical and numerical techniques to study patterns and departures from patterns, collecting data according to a well-developed plan, applying probability as a tool to anticipate what the distribution of data should look like under a given model, and using statistical inference to guide the selection of appropriate models. 

Students will not be allowed to drop an AP course after they have signed up and courses are scheduled. This is a one-year course; students may not drop at semester.    


Advanced Placement Calculus AB - 60625S1 and 60625S2
             
                                       

Credit:  1.0
Grades:  11-12
Prerequisite: “C” or better in Trigonometry/Pre-Calculus
Expenses:  It is highly recommended students purchase an AP textbook (approximately $100) and a graphing calculator (TI84, TI89).
AP Exam:  Students enrolled in the course are expected to take the National AP Exam in May (Approximately $93).

AP Calculus AB is a college level class that provides students with an academic experience equivalent to first semester college calculus.  Students may earn college credit by passing the AP Calculus AB exam, which is administered annually.

AP Calculus AB emphasizes the theory of elementary functions, differential and integral calculus of functions of the variable.  Topics include various types of functions, limits, continuity, the derivative and its applications and the integral and its applications. 

This is a one-year course; students may not drop at semester.    


Advanced Placement Calculus BC - 60650S1 and 60650S2

Credit:  1.0
Grades:  11-12
Prerequisite: “C” or better in AP Calculus AB
Expenses:  It is highly recommended students purchase an AP textbook (approximately $100) and a graphing calculator (TI84 or TI89).
AP Exam:  Students enrolled in the course are expected to take the National AP Exam in May (approximately $93).

AP Calculus BC is a college level class that provides students with an academic experience equivalent to second semester college calculus.  Students may earn college credit by passing the AP Calculus BC exam, which is administered annually.  AP Calculus BC reviews topics presented in AP Calculus AB.  It continues on with extended applications of derivatives and integrals, derivatives of parametric, polar, and vector functions, polynomial approximations and series, and study of the Taylor series.

This is a one-year course; students may not drop at semester.    


Advanced Placement Language and Composition - 50390S1 and 50390S2

Credit:  1.0
Grade:  11
Expenses:  Because AP Language is a college level elective, students are encouraged to purchase texts for the course (in accordance with the Douglas County Board of Education policy). 
AP Exam:  Students enrolled in the course are expected to take the National AP Exam in May (approximately $93).

The cornerstone of the Advanced Placement English Language and Composition course is practice in the use of rhetoric and composition with a particular emphasis on argumentative, expository, and narrative forms.  Close, critical reading and discussion of texts representing a variety of genres and periods, coupled with careful writing employing several compositional approaches will inculcate the analytical and creative skills necessary for success on the AP exam.

This is a one-year course; students may not drop at semester.  


Advanced Placement Literature and Composition - 50400S1 and 50400S2

Credit:  1.0
Grade:  12
Expenses: Because AP Literature is a college level elective, students are encouraged to purchase texts for the course (in accordance with the Douglas County Board of Education policy). 
AP Exam:  Students enrolled in the course are expected to take the National AP Exam in May (approximately $93).

AP English Literature and Composition is a college-level class that provides students with an academic experience equivalent to a freshman/sophomore college survey class of English Literature.  Students successfully mastering the course material may earn college credit by passing the AP English Literature Exam, which is administered annually.  Because this AP course is a college-level elective, students will be asked to purchase their materials in accordance with the Douglas County Board of Education policy.

This is a one-year course; students may not drop at semester.   


Advanced Placement Spanish Language V - 95640S1 and 95640S2 

Advanced Placement French Language V - 95440S1 and 95440S2

Credit: 1.0
Grade: 11-12
Prerequisite: Successful completion of Level IV
Expenses: It is highly recommended that students purchase a workbook for this course.
AP Exam: Students enrolled in any of these courses are expected to take the National AP Exam in May (approximately $93).

AP Level V classes offer the students a weighted credit. Students continue building their fluency in the language through oral, written, listening and reading practice.  These classes are conducted entirely in the target language (Spanish, French or Chinese) with both students and teachers communicating only in the target language. Students in Level V classes prepare to take the Language Advanced Placement tests which are given in May. Advanced Placement courses allow students to take the challenge of college-level courses while in the familiar surroundings of their high school.  AP courses develop advanced reading, writing, and thinking skills that benefit students in their post-secondary pursuits.  These courses require work outside the classroom, during Summer and breaks.  Students should consider their academic, social, work, and extra-curricular activities before undertaking the commitment of an Advanced Placement course.  Students will not be allowed to drop an AP course after they have signed up and courses are scheduled. 

This is a one-year course; students may not drop at semester. 

Note: AP Literature and AP Language can be taken concurrently with instructor approval.

Assessment at the end of Level V parallel to the AP test:

  • Speaking: The students demonstrate the ability to describe, paraphrase, express felling and opinions, give information and ask and answer questions using diverse grammatical structures and vocabulary.
  • Writing: The student composes compositions of 200-250 words on a variety of concrete and abstract topics using diverse vocabulary and correct syntax.
  • Reading: The student relates and responds to the main idea and some supporting detail of selected works written by native authors for native readers.
  • Listening: The student demonstrates an understanding of native speakers from selected listening sources such as speakers, authentic videos, films, television, and recorded conversations by responding appropriately.
  • Culture: The student demonstrates cultural empathy through appropriate behavior. The student demonstrates knowledge of aspects of the civilization of the target language (French or Spanish) such as history, fine arts, music or geography.

Advanced Placement Studio Art (Drawing/Painting) -15476S1 and 15476S2

Advanced Placement Studio Art 2D (Photo/Graphics) - 15478S1 and 15478S2

Advanced Placement Studio Art 3D (Jewelry) - 15480S1 and 15480S2

Advanced Placement Studio Art 3D (Ceramics) - 15479S1 and 15479S2

Credit:  1.0 
Grades:  11-12
Prerequisite: Drawing and Painting I, II & III; Ceramics II-III; Jewelry I, I, III; Honors;  Photography II or teacher recommendation or by extensive portfolio 
Expenses:  Course fee of $80.00 per year  
(all fees subject to change pending BOE approval)
AP Exam:  Students enrolled in the course are expected to take the National AP Exam (submit a portfolio) in May (approximately $93).

The Advanced Placement Program in art is intended for highly motivated students who are seriously interested in the study of art.  Students should be aware that Advanced Placement work involves significantly more time than the typical high school course and the program is not for the casually interested.  Projects include a wide spectrum of media and methods.  Students will complete an area of concentration with theme and media development.  Students will also complete an area of breadth demonstrating a variety of skills, ideas, and media.  Students may choose to complete an AP portfolio in 2D design, 3D design, or Drawing.

Students may specialize in AP Studio Art-Drawing and Painting; AP Studio Art-Ceramics, AP Studio Art-Jewelry or AP Studio Art-Photography/Graphics.

These are one-year courses; students may not drop at semester.    


Advanced Placement World History – 85340S1 and 85340S2

Credit: 1.0
Grades:  10
Prerequisite:  Successful completion of US History
Expenses:  It is highly recommended that students purchase an AP textbook.
AP Exam:  Students enrolled in the course are expected to take the National AP Exam in May (Approximately $93).

The purpose of the AP World History course is to develop greater understanding of the evolution of global processes and contacts in interaction with different types of human societies. This understanding is advanced through a combination of selective factual knowledge and appropriate analytical skills. The course highlights the nature of changes in international frameworks and their causes and consequences, as well as comparisons among major societies. The course emphasizes relevant factual knowledge deployed in conjunction with leading interpretive issues and types of historical evidence. The course builds on an understanding of culture, institutional, and technological precedents that, along with geography, set the human stage. Periodization, explicitly discussed, forms an organizing principle for dealing with change and continuity throughout the course.


Advanced Placement European History - 85500S1 and 85500S2

Credit:  1.0
Grades:  11-12
Prerequisite:  Successful completion of U.S. History, World History or AP World History
Expenses:  It is highly recommended that students purchase an AP textbook.
AP Exam:  Students enrolled in the course are expected to take the National AP Exam in May (approximately $93).

This year-long course for juniors spans the period from the Late Medieval (1450) to present-day developments in the European history.  Intellectual-cultural, political-diplomatic, and social-economic facets of European traditions are addressed.  Further, the intent of the course is to expose the students to an understanding of some of the principle themes in modern history, and to use the techniques of historical analysis in creating well-organized essays.  The Advanced Placement Program is designed to provide students with a college level academic experience.  Students successfully mastering the course material may earn college credit on the AP European History exam, which is administered annually.  Because this AP course is a college level elective, students will be asked to purchase their materials in accordance with Douglas County Board of Education policy.

This is a one-year course; students may not drop at semester. 


Advanced Placement U.S. History - 85625S1 and 85625S2

Credit:  1.0
Grades: 12
Prerequisite:  Successful completion of World History or AP World History
Expenses:  It is highly recommended that students purchase an AP textbook.
AP Exam:  Students enrolled in the course are expected to take the National AP Exam in May (approximately $93).

This yer long course for seniors is designed to provide students with the analytic skills and knowledge necessary to deal critically with the problems and issues in U.S. History.  The course exposes students to a college level academic experience in the jamor cultural, social, political, economic, and historical issues found in U.S. History from 1492 to present.  Students successfully mastering the course material may earn college credit on the AP U.S. History exam which is administered annually.  Because this AP course is a college level elective, students will be asked to purchase their materials in accordance with Douglas County Board of Education policy.

This is a one-year course; students may not drop at semester.


Advanced Placement United States Government and Politics - 85720

Credit:  0.5
Grades: 12
Prerequisite:  Successful completion of World History or AP World History
Expenses:  It is highly recommended that students purchase an AP textbook.
AP Exam:  Students enrolled in the course are expected to take the National AP Exam in May (approximately $93).

This semester long course will give students an analytical perspective on government and politics in the United States.  This course includes both the study of general concepts used to interpret U.S. politics and the analysis of specific examples.  It also requires familiarity with the various institutions, groups, beliefs, and ideas that constitute U.S politics.  The Advanced Placement Program is designed to provide students with a college level academic experience.  Students successfully mastering the course material may earn college on the AP National Exam.  Because this AP course is a college level elective, students will be asked to purchase their materials in accordance with Douglas County Board of Education policy.

This is a semester-long course.

Advanced Placement Macroeconomics – 85631


Credit: ( 0.5)
Grades:  11-12
Prerequisite: (none)
Expenses: 
It is highly recommended that students purchase an AP textbook
AP Exam:  Students enrolled in the course are expected to take the National AP Exam in May (Approximately $93).
 

AP Macroeconomics is an exciting and important course that teaches students to understand economics on a large scale, including the economies of nations.  You learn basic economic concepts as well as how to understand and interpret GDP, unemployment, and inflation to measure the economic performance of a nation.  You will also learn about the financial sector which includes the Federal Reserve, monetary and fiscal policy, and money.  This course is open to all and is highly recommended for students interested in business, finance, and the social sciences.


Advanced Placement Psychology - 85760S1 and 85760S2

Credit:  1.0
Grades: 11-12
Prerequisite:  Grade of “C” or above in Biology or Anatomy
Expenses:  It is highly recommended that students purchase an AP textbook.
AP Exam:  Students enrolled in the course are expected to take the National AP Exam in May (approximately $93).

This year long course for juniors or seniors is designed to introduce the systematic and scientific study of the behavior and mental processes of human beings and other animals.  Included is a consideration of the psychological facts, principles, and phenomena associated with each of the major subfields within psychology.  Students also learn about the ethics and methods psychologists use in their science and practice.

This is a one-year course; students may not drop at semester.    

Art History I - 15605 

Credit:  0.5 Fine Art Credit  
Grades: 9-12 
Expense:  $20 project fee per semester (
all fees subject to change pending BOE approval)

Discover and learn about the art and architecture of the world. Hands on art activities.


Art History II - 15606

Credit:  0.5 Fine Art Credit
Grades:  9-12
Expense: $20 project fee per semester 
(all fees subject to change pending BOE approval)

Learn in-depth about the art and the artists who created them, including myths and facts. Hands on art activities.


Adaptive Art - 15402

Credit:  0.5 Fine Art Credit
Grades:  9-12
Prerequisite:  None
Expense:  $40 Project fee per semester (all fees subject to change pending BOE approval)

Adaptive Art is an introductory collaborative course providing specialized instruction, uniting peer helpers with special needs students.  Working in pairs, students will create art projects using a variety of media and processes, including but not limited to, painting, drawing, photography, clay, printmaking, mixed media, and sculpture.  This course may be taken more than once for credit.


Ceramics I - 15425                                                                                                    

Credit:  0.5 Fine Art Credit
Grades:  9-12
Expense:  $40 project fee per semester (all fees subject to change pending BOE approval)

Ceramics I is an introduction to three-dimensional design in clay, focusing on hand-building and surface techniques with an introduction to wheel throwing. 


Ceramics II - 15430

Credit:  0.5 Fine Art Credit 
Grades:  9-12

Prerequisite: Must pass Ceramics I with a grade of ”C” or better
Expense:  $40 project fee per semester (all fees subject to change pending BOE approval)

This course is a continuation of Ceramics I with emphasis on techniques, forms, designs and proficiency in wheel throwing. 


Ceramics III - 15435

Credit:  0.5 Fine Art Credit 
Grades:  10-12
Prerequisite: Must pass Ceramics II with a grade of ”C” or better 
Expense:  
$40 project fee per semester (all fees subject to change pending BOE approval)                                                            

This course is a continuation of Ceramics II with an emphasis on advanced technique, form, and design.


Ceramics IV - 15440

Credit:  0.5 Fine Art Credit
Grades:  10-12 
P
rerequisite: Must pass Ceramics III with a grade of ”C” or better
Expense:  $40 project fee per semester (all fees subject to change pending BOE approval)

Students will work on individual advanced projects with an emphasis on portfolio development. 


Graphic Design I - 15450 

Credit:  0.5 Fine Art Credit
Grades: 9-12
Expense:  $40 project fee per semester (all fees subject to change pending BOE approval)

Graphic Design will introduce students to various tools, techniques, and concepts employed by the graphic artist.  Students will learn design and layout while completing professional projects such as typeface, packaging, lettering, illustration, and advertising.


Graphic Design II - 15455

Credit:  0.5 Fine Art Credit
Grades:  9-12
Prerequisite: Must pass Graphic Design I with a grade of  ”C” or better
Expense:  $40 project fee per semester (all fees subject to change pending BOE approval)

This course continues the creative and technical experiences introduced in Graphic Design I along with computer design, illustration, lettering, advertising methods, and publication layout and design. 


Drawing & Painting I - 15500 

Credit:  0.5 Fine Art Credit
Grades:  9-12

Expense:  $40 project fee per semester (all fees subject to change pending BOE approval)

This course focuses on drawing and painting techniques using a variety of media and styles.


Drawing & Painting II - 15505

Credit:  0.5 Fine Art Credit
Grades:  9-12

Prerequisite: Must pass Drawing & Painting I with a grade of ”C” or better
Expense:  $40 project fee per semester (all fees subject to change pending BOE approval)

Students will focus on more advanced drawing and painting media, techniques, and artistic styles.  Individual expression and personal style are encouraged.


Drawing & Painting III - 15510

Credit:  0.5 Fine Art Credit
Grades:  10-12

Prerequisite: Must pass Drawing & Painting II with a grade of ”C” or better
Expense:  $40 project fee per semester (all fees subject to change pending BOE approval)

This course allows the serious art student to further develop skills, ideas, creativity in drawing and painting to build a portfolio or a body of work.


Drawing & Painting IV - 15515

Credit:  0.5 Fine Art Credit
Grades:  10-12
Prerequisite: Must pass Drawing & Painting III with a grade of ”C” or better
Expense:  $40 project fee per semester (all fees subject to change pending BOE approval)

Students will work on individual advanced projects with an emphasis on portfolio development.


Sculpture I - 15550 

Credit:  0.5 Fine Art Credit
Grades:  9-12
Prerequisite:  None
Expense:  $40 project fee per semester (all fees subject to change pending BOE approval)

Sculpture I is designed to develop problem-solving skills through experimentation with a variety of materials and techniques.


Sculpture II - 15555 

Credit:  0.5 Fine Art Credit
Grades:  9-12
Prerequisite: Must pass Sculpture I with a grade of ”C” or better
Expense:  $40 project fee per semester  (all fees subject to change pending BOE approval)

In this course students will further experience traditional and experimental approaches to creating and constructing sculpture. 


Photography I -15575  

Credit:  0.5 Fine Art Credit
Grades:  9-12
Prerequisite:  None
Expense:  $40 project fee per semester 
(all fees subject to change pending BOE approval)

This course is an introduction to photography as a fine art medium and develops skills necessary for basic camera and computer lab operation.  Students will shoot their own pictures using digital cameras and enhance the photos using Photoshop.


Photography II -15580

Credit:  0.5 Fine Art Credit
Grades:  9-12
Prerequisite:  Must pass Photography I with a grade of “C” or better
Expense:  $40 project fee per semester 
(all fees subject to change pending BOE approval)

Push your artistic potential to its limits using the power of the computer.  Building upon skills acquired in Photography I, students will use digital cameras, scanners, Adobe Photoshop, and Adobe Illustrator to further explore the creative possibilities offered by these exciting tools.  Students learn valuable real-world skills used in a variety of careers involving the creation and manipulation of digital images.


Jewelry I -15525 

Credit:  0.5 Fine Art Credit
Grades:  9-12
Expense:  $40 project fee per semester 
(all fees subject to change pending BOE approval)

This course is an introduction to the design and construction of jewelry involving a variety of tools, techniques and materials.


Jewelry II -15530  

Credit:  0.5 Fine Art Credit
Grades:  9-12
Prerequisite:  Must pass Jewelry I with a grade of ”C” or better
Expense:  $40 project fee per semester (all fees subject to change pending BOE approval)

This course is designed to allow students a continued experience in jewelry making.  Conceptual design development and advanced jewelry techniques will be explored. 


Jewelry III -15535   

Credit:  0.5 Fine Art Credit
Grades: 10-12
Prerequisite: Must pass Jewelry II with a grade of ”C” or better
Expense:  $40 project fee per semester (all fees subject to change pending BOE approval)

This course is designed to instruct students in advanced techniques and the development of jewelry designs with an emphasis on the exploration of personal style.


Jewelry IV - 15540

Credit:  0.5 Fine Art Credit
Grades:  10-12
Prerequisite: Must pass Jewelry III with a grade of ”C” or better
Expense:  $40 project fee per semester (all fees subject to change pending BOE approval)

Students will work on individual advanced projects with an emphasis on portfolio development.


Honors Art Ceramics – 15445S1 and 15445S2

Credit:  1.0 Fine Art Credit 
Grades: 11-12
Prerequisite: Completion of Ceramics I, II and III with a grade earned of C or better, or Ceramics I and II with teacher permission
Expense: Course fee of $40 fee per semester/$80 per year 
(all fees subject to change pending BOE approval)

This course is for students interested in learning advanced techniques in Ceramics to develop a portfolio of exemplary artwork for higher education, career pursuits or to prepare for AP Ceramics 3D Design Portfolio course expectations.  


Honors Art Drawing and Painting – 15521S1 and 15521S2

Credit:  1.0 Fine Art Credit
Grades: 11-12
Prerequisite: Completion of Drawing and Painting I, II and III with a grade earned of C or better or Drawing and Painting I and II with teacher permission
Expense:  Course fee of $40 per semester/$80 per year 
(all fees subject to change pending BOE approval)

This course is for students interested in learning advanced techniques in Drawing and Painting to develop a portfolio of exemplary artwork for higher education, career pursuits or to prepare for AP Drawing Portfolio course expectations. 


Honors Art Jewelry – 15545S1 and 15545S2

Credit:  1.0 Fine Art Credit
Grades: 11-12
Prerequisite: Completion of Jewelry I, II and III with a grade earned of C or better, or Jewelry I and II with teacher permission
Expense: Course fee of $40 per semester/$80 per year 
(all fees subject to change pending BOE approval)

This course is for students interested in learning advanced techniques in Jewelry to develop a portfolio of exemplary artwork for higher education, career pursuits or to prepare for AP 3D Jewelry Portfolio course expectations.  


Multimedia II – Gaming/Programming – 31005

Credit: 0.5 Practical Art Credit
Grades: 9-12
Prerequisites: Multimedia I or Graphic Design I
Expense:  Course fee of $35 
(all fees subject to change pending BOE approval)

Create eye-catching video game scenes as you learn to apply design principles in simulated 3-D spaces.  Students will develop visual communication skills and ideation using traditional pencil and paper media, then transfer game visuals to the computer using Photoshop, Illustrator, and Cinema 4D software.  Storyboarding, character design, virtual environments, vehicle design, and basic animation will be addressed in a curriculum that emphasizes the importance of visual impact in the growing gaming industry. 

Multimedia III - Advanced Video Game Art and Design - 31020

Credit: 0.5 Practical Art Credit 
Grades: 10-12
Prerequisite: Multimedia II - Gaming/Programming
Expense:  Course fee of  $35 fee per semester (all fees subject to change pending BOE approval)

Students continue the creation and refinement of storyboarding, character design, environments, and vehicle design. Clay models will be formed and then reproduced in the computer using Cinema 4D software.  Animation of 3D models will be investigated.



Advanced Placement Studio Art (Drawing/Painting) -15476S1 and 15476S2

Advanced Placement Studio Art 2D (Photo/Graphics) - 15478S1 and 15478S2

Advanced Placement Studio Art 3D (Jewelry) - 15480S1 and 15480S2

Advanced Placement Studio Art 3D (Ceramics) - 15479S1 and 15479S2

THIS IS A YEAR-LONG COURSE

Credit:  1.0 Fine Art Credit (weighted grade)
Grades:  11-12
Prerequisite: Drawing and Painting I, II & III; Honors, Ceramics I, II & III; Jewelry I, II & III; Photography I and II or teacher recommendation or by extensive portfolio.
Expense:  Course fee of $40 fee per semester/$80 per year (all fees subject to change pending BOE approval)
AP Exam:  Students enrolled in the course are expected to take the National AP Exam (submit portfolio) in May (approximately $93).

The Advanced Placement Program in art is intended for highly motivated students who are seriously interested in the study of art.  Students should be aware that Advanced Placement work involves significantly more time than the typical high school course and the program is not for the casually interested.  Projects include a wide spectrum of media and methods.  Students will complete an area of concentration with theme and media development.  Students will also complete an area of breadth demonstrating a variety of skills, ideas, and media.  Students may choose to complete an AP portfolio in 2D design, 3D design, or Drawing.

Students may specialize in AP Studio Art-Drawing and Painting; AP Studio Art-Ceramics, AP Studio Art-Jewelry or AP Studio Art-Photography/Graphics.

Advanced Placement courses allow students to take the challenge of college-level courses while in the familiar surroundings of their high school.  AP courses develop advanced reading, writing, and thinking skills that benefit students in their post-secondary pursuits.  These courses require work outside the classroom, during breaks.  Students should consider their academic, social, work, and extra-curricular activities before undertaking the commitment of an Advanced Placement course.  Students will not be allowed to drop an AP course after they have signed up and courses are scheduled. These are one-year courses; students may not drop at semester.   


IB Art Design HL I - 11411S1 and 11411S2 (Jr. year)
IB Art Design HL I is the first year of a two- year sequence. Students selecting HL courses during the junior year are committed to completing the senior year of the two-year sequence.

IB Art Design HL II - 11415S1 and 11415S2 (Sr. year)

 IB Art Design HL is a two-year sequence with IB exam submissions at the end of the second year. This course fulfills the Group 6 requirements for the IB Diploma Programme and is open to IB Course students on an availability basis. Submission of the Course Student Commitment Form to the IB office, room C120, is required at the beginning of the course.

Credit: 2.0
Grade:  11 and 12
Prerequisite:  Prior to HL I, recommended 1 semester Art History and 1 semester 2-Dimensional (2D) Art or 3-Dimensional (3D) Art
Expenses: $40 fee per semester/$80 per year 

Course description: 

  • This course is a two year course sequence at the Higher Level (HL).  IB Visual Art provides students with explorations in a variety of means and materials.  
  • Students will write reflections and research in the history of art and design.  
  • The HL course is for the visual art student, with creative and imaginative abilities, who may pursue the visual arts at the university or college level.
  • Provides students with the opportunities to make personal, socio-cultural and aesthetic experiences meaningful through the production and understanding of art.
  • Exemplifies and encourages an inquiring and integrated approach towards visual arts in their various historical and contemporary forms.
  • Promotes visual and contextual knowledge of art from various cultures.
  • Provides students with the common core elements in both HL and SL including an introduction to art concepts, art criticism and analysis, the acquisition of art studio techniques, media and skills, along with the relation of art to socio-cultural and historical contexts.

BUSINESS COURSES

Business Principles - 25700

Credit: 0.5 Practical Art Credit
Grades: 9-12
Prerequisite: None
Expenses:  None

This course is designed to introduce students to many aspects of business including the following topics: economics, marketing, management, business structures, finance, credit, banking, consumer rights and the significance of career choice.  Students will also understand which additional TRHS Business courses they may want to take during High School, in preparation for college and life after graduation.  This course will provide perspectives on additional business and technology classes available to students.  It is recommended that students are actively involved in FUTURE BUSINESS LEADERS OF AMERICA (FBLA).  ThunderRidge’s FBLA provides significant “real world” experience to students for college and career. 


Accounting I - 25450S1 and 25450S2 

Credit: 1.0 Practical Art credit
Grades:  9-12
Expenses:  None

Accounting I is a College Preparatory class.  Students will be introduced to Bookkeeping/Accounting principles in the area of Proprietorships and Partnerships.  Emphasis will be placed on both the manual and computerized methods of Accounting.  Students that intend Business as their college major are strongly encouraged to take Accounting I.  It is recommended that students are actively involved in FUTURE BUSINESS LEADERS OF AMERICA (FBLA).  TRHS’ FBLA provides significant “real world” experience to students for college and career. 


Accounting II -  25455S1 and 25455S2

Credit: 1.0 Practical Art Credit
Grades:10-12
Prerequisite: 25450 Accounting I
Expenses:  None

Accounting II is a continuation of Accounting I.  Students will be introduced to Accounting for Corporations, with an emphasis on Automated Accounting.


Marketing I – 25570S1 and 25570S2

Credit:  1.0 Practical Art Credit
Grades: 9-12
Prerequisites: None
Expense:  
DECA membership fee of $40 - students enrolled in a Marketing course are required to be members of DECA.

Marketing I is a year-long course.  It is designed to teach students marketing foundations and functions. It also sets the stage for further studying of marketing in higher education. The class will introduce students to the real world of work and help them prepare for a marketing career. Principle units of the course will be selling, promotion, economics, pricing, visual merchandising, product/service planning, financing and advertising.  All students are members of DECA and are encouraged to test their business skills in DECA competitive activities.


IB Business Management Standard Level (SL) and Higher Level (HL)

 IB Business Management may be taken as a one-year SL Course with exams in May or taken as a two-year sequence for IB Business

Management HL with exams at the end of the second year. This course fulfills the Group 6 requirements for the IB Diploma Programme and is open to IB Course students on an availability basis. Submission of the Course Student Commitment Form to the IB office, room C120, is required at the beginning of the course.


 IB Business Management SL - 25720S1 and 25720S2

Credit: 1.0
Grades:  11 or 12

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Marketing I
Expense:  DECA membership fee of $40 - students enrolled in IB Business are required to be members of DECA.

IB Business Management HL - 25721S1 and 25721S2

Credit: 1.0
Grades:  12

Prerequisite: Successful completion of IB Business Management SL and teacher recommendation.
Expense:  DECA membership fee of $40 - students enrolled in IB Business are required to be members of DECA.

Course description:

  •  The Business Management Course is designed to develop students' knowledge and understanding of business management theories, as well as their ability to apply a range of tools and techniques.
  • Students learn to analyze, discuss and evaluate business activities at local, national and international levels.
  • The course covers a range of organizations from all sectors, as well as the sociocultural and economic contexts in which those organizations operate.
  • Students in HL are expected to complete extensions of the core units adding depth and breadth the second year of study.


ACC Principles of Marketing (MAR 216 or Marketing II)  – 69216S1 and 69216S2 CE

Credit: 1.0 Practical Art Credit / ACC 3 credit hours.  This Course receives both high school and college credit.  ACC credit will be awarded with a grade of "C" or better. 
Grades: 10-12
Prerequisite: Marketing I & Instructor approval
Expense:  DECA membership fee of $40 - students enrolled in a Marketing course are required to be members of DECA.   

Marketing II/Principles of Marketing is a year-long dual credit course with ACC.  It is designed for the serious business student who is contemplating a business or marketing major in college as well as a career in the business world. Units of study include professional selling, advertising, marketing research, market segmentation, sports and entertainment marketing, entrepreneurship, and business planning. Through field trips and the incorporation of business and marketing professionals, this class will prepare students for a marketing major in college as well as give them a number of hands-on experiences that will translate to a real-world career in business and marketing. All students are members of DECA.


ACC Intro to PC Applications (CIS 118) - 69020

Credits: 0.5 Practical Art Credit / ACC 3 credit hours.  This course receives both high school and college credit.  ACC credit will be awarded with a grade of "C" or better. 
Grades: 9 - 12
Prerequisite: None
Expense: Purchase of a textbook 


This course introduces computer concepts and components, as well as application-suite software and the Internet.  It includes descriptions of hands-on experiences with word processing, spreadsheets, databases, presentations and other common PC application packages.  Specifically, students will leave with advanced skills in Word, Excel, Access and PowerPoint.  Real-world projects or personal and professional use are incorporated into this class.  Credit received in this class will be transferable to other Colorado colleges.  Though the course number indicates semester one (S1), the class may be scheduled either first or second semester.


Business Law – 25475  

Credit: 0.5 Practical Art Credit
Grades:  9-12

This course will have units on ethics and the law, criminal law, United States court system, contracts, and consumer law.  The purpose of the course is to expose students to a broad overview of the world of law through real-life simulations and hands-on projects such as buying and leasing a car, renting an apartment and buying a house. Students will be exposed to the following:  Basics of the Law, Contract Law, Law of Sales and Consumer Law, Criminal Law and Tort Law, Bankruptcy.  It is recommended that students are actively involved in FUTURE BUSINESS LEADERS OF AMERICA (FBLA).  TRHS’ FBLA provides significant “real world” experience to students for college and career. 


Entrepreneurship 25525 (semester 1)

Social Media of Business 69217 CE MAR155 (semester 2)

MUST register for both courses - one semester each

Credit: 1.0 Practical Art Credit / ACC 3 credit hours The Customer Service course receives both high school and college credit.  ACC credit will be awarded with a grade of "C" or better. 
Grade: 11-12
Prerequisite: Marketing I AND Marketing II OR Teacher Approval
Expenses: 
DECA membership fee of $40 - students enrolled in a Marketing course are required to be members of DECA.

First semester will focus on Entrepreneurship.  This component of the course is designed for seniors who are interested in exploring advanced topics in marketing and business ownership. This is a course that will require you to demonstrate your ability to work independently, identify and utilize available resources, and write and present an extensive formal business plan for a proposed business of your choice.

Second semester will focus on Customer Service.  This component of the course enables students to learn about their relationship to customers, including facets of problem solving and communication.  Specific emphasis is given to managing customer expectations by building customer rapport and creating positive outcomes. 

Active participation in DECA is an integral component of the curriculum and is strongly encouraged. Membership in DECA is mandatory for all Entrepreneurship and Customer Service students.


Professional Business I (Career and Life Strategies–All Careers included)  - 25657S1 and 25657S2

Credit:  1.0 Practical Art Credit
Grades:  10-12
Prerequisite:  None - Optional Work Experience - See Below

This course is a year long business elective that focuses on students discovering who they are, what they want to do with their lives and how they will get there. Included in this class are topics like: career assessment, occupational research, exploratory interview, interview skills, work based skills, business writing, goal setting, importance of attitude, leadership, corporate America, networking and financial planning. 

The first semester will focus on students building their personal profile to learn more about their interests, strengths, weaknesses, etc. The second semester will focus on aspects of career success including: business writing, workplace challenges, job interviewing and financial planning. 

Students are expected to bring maturity and discipline to class every day as these course topics require critical and insightful thinking, as well as participation in class discussion. This class is discussion heavy and all students are expected to participate. 

This course is offered as an option in conjunction with Professional Business Training Work Experience. It is recommended that students are involved in Future Business Leaders of America (FBLA), as it provides significant "real world" experience to students for both college and career. 


Professional Business Training Work Experience 110

     25656S1 (Fall Semester) or 25656S2 (Spring Semester)

Credit: 0.5 Practical Arts Credit per semester – 120 documented work hours for (1) release period (see below)
Grades: 11-12

Prerequisite:  Must be enrolled concurrently in the Prof. Business I Course above, provide their own daily transportation and complete district personal vehicle use and other forms.  Junior students enrolled in this course must also be enrolled in a minimum of 6 other courses per semester; senior students are to be enrolled in a minimum of 5 other courses per semester. 

Professional Business Training Work Experience is a pass/fail course requiring completion of work hours for a (P).  Students not completing the required work hours will earn an (F) for this course.


Professional Business Training Work Experience 240

     25658S1 Fall Semester or 25658S2 Spring Semester

Credit: 1.0 Practical Art Credit per semester – 240 documented work hours for (2) release periods (see below)
Grades: 11-12
Prerequisite:  Must be enrolled in the Prof. Business I Course above, provide their own daily transportation and complete district personal vehicle use and other forms.  
 Junior students enrolled in this course must also be enrolled in a minimum of 6 other courses per semester; senior students are to be enrolled in a minimum of 5 other courses per semester.

Registration Note:  Please sign up for PBT Work Experience 110 (S1 or S2 or both semesters) if you desire a single period release for 0.5 credits; sign up for PBT Work Experience 240 (S1 or S2 or both semesters) for two period release and 1.0 credit.   

Earn school credit for successful completion of a work experience opportunity.  Students must average at least 7.5 hours per week if they are seeking 0.5 credits per semester and an average of 15 hours per week if they are seeking to earn 1.0 credit per semester. Students will need a training agreement between student, parent, employers and coordinator and periodic evaluations with their employer.  Proof of employer workman’s compensation is a requirement of the class.  

Professional Business Training Work Experience is a pass/fail course requiring completion of work hours for a (P).  Students not completing the required work hours will earn an (F) for this course.

Multimedia I - Survey Course - 30575

Credit: 0.5 Practical Art Credit
Grades:  9-12
Expense:  Course fee of $35 per semester (all fees subject to change pending BOE approval)

Students will survey six media areas to compare, analyze, and will combine various multimedia software to determine their relationship. This course for computer literate students focuses on using a variety of software to develop multimedia productions. Students will create professional multimedia presentations that incorporate text, graphics, video, and sound. Students will be able to effectively maneuver through cyberspace, research, collect information, and be able to output that information in a professional, media-rich manner.  Students will have the opportunity to apply these skills while using advanced hardware and professional software. Students will also use design techniques to help create web pages and add to their videos.


Graphic Design I - 15450 

Credit:  0.5 Fine Art Credit
Grades: 9-12
Expense:  $40 project fee per semester (all fees subject to change pending BOE approval)

Graphic Design will introduce students to various tools, techniques, and concepts employed by the graphic artist.  Students will learn design and layout while completing professional projects such as typeface, packaging, lettering, illustration, and advertising.


Graphic Design II - 15455

Credit:  0.5 Fine Art Credit
Grades:  9-12
Prerequisite: Must pass Graphic Design I with a grade of  ”C” or better
Expense:  $40 project fee per semester (all fees subject to change pending BOE approval)

This course continues the creative and technical experiences introduced in Graphic Design I along with computer design, illustration, lettering, advertising methods, and publication layout and design. 


Multimedia II - Video Production - 31000 

Credit: 0.5 Practical Art Credit
Grades: 9-12
Prerequisites: Multimedia I or teacher approval
Expense:  Course fee of $35 (all fees subject to change pending BOE approval)

This semester-long course addresses both the technical and the journalistic aspects of broadcast journalism.  Students will focus on the content, style and technical aspects of broadcast journalism.  Topics also include general script writing, planning, use of camera shots, and editing.  Students will learn how to write for broadcast, create video packages, as well as how to operate tricasters, cameras, teleprompters and lighting equipment.  

Although this course is suitable for anyone interested in journalism, it is geared towards those who wish to be well prepared for assuming roles on the high school broadcast staff. It is also excellent preparation for IB Film.


Multimedia II – Gaming/Programming (visual effects/design) – 31005

Credit: 0.5 Practical Art Credit
Grades: 9-12
Prerequisites: Multimedia I or Graphic Design I
Expense:  Course fee of $35  
(all fees subject to change pending BOE approval)

Create eye-catching video game scenes as you learn to apply design principles in simulated 3-D spaces.  Students will develop visual communication skills and ideation using traditional pencil and paper media, then transfer game visuals to the computer using Photoshop, Illustrator, and Cinema 4D software.  Storyboarding, character design, virtual environments, vehicle design, and basic animation will be addressed in a curriculum that emphasizes the importance of visual impact in the growing gaming industry. 


Multimedia II - Web Design - 30601

Credit:  0.5 Practical Art Credit
Grades:  9-12
Prerequisite:  None
Expense:  Course fee of $35 per semester (all fees subject to change pending BOE approval)

Students will move beyond the introductory level of electronic media for students to learn intermediate skills in web design. This course is a hands-on introduction to web techniques including: HTML, Dreamweaver, Fireworks, and Flash.  Students will also be introduced to web database technology, explore career options with the web design/development field, and create websites for mock clients.  Upon completion of this course, students will be able to create a complete website from start to finish reflecting a basic understanding of design and development practices.


Multimedia II – 3D Animation – 31010

Credit:  0.5 Practical Art Credit
Grades:  9-12
Prerequisite:  Multimedia I or teacher approval 
Expense:  Course fee of $35 per semester (all fees subject to change pending BOE approval)

This course focuses on using advanced software applications for developing 2 and 3 dimensional animations.  Upon completion of this course, students will have the fundamental skills to create animated short movies and may take it more than one semester.


Multimedia III - Advanced Video Game Art and Design (visual effects/design) - 31020

Credit: 0.5 Practical Art Credit
Grades: 10-12 
Prerequisite: Multimedia  II: Gaming/Programming
Expense:  Course fee of $35 per semester (all fees subject to change pending BOE approval)

Students continue the creation and refinement of storyboarding, character design, environments, and vehicle design. Clay models will be formed and then reproduced in the computer using Cinema 4D software.  Animation of 3D models will be investigated.



Digital Audio Production - 70685

Credit:  0.5 Fine Art Credit
Grades: 9-12

Prerequisites: None
Expense:  Course fee of $20 (all fees subject to change per BOE approval)

Students will develop essential skills needed to: operate audio equipment; plan, setup and execute production sessions; collaborate in the creation of production material and music; complete projects on both an individual and team-oriented basis. Production will include the use of professional audio equipment, "Logic" audio production software(recording, editing, mixing, mastering), audio production strategies, and basic music theory.


ACC INTRO TO PC APPLICATIONS (CIS 118) - 69020S1 

Credits: 0.5 Practical Art Credit / ACC 3 credit hours.  This course receives both high school and college credit.
Grades: 9 - 12
Prerequisite: None
Expense: Purchase of a textbook; ACC registration fee.  The registration fee may be covered by a stipend provided by the state of Colorado through the Colorado 
              Opportunity Fund provided eligible students complete the necessary paperwork.  Visit 
the Colorado Opportunity Fund website for more information. 

This course introduces computer concepts and components, as well as application-suite software and the Internet.  it includes descriptions of hands-on experiences with word processing, spreadsheets, databases, presentations and other common PC application packages.  Specifically, students will leave with advanced skills in Word, Excel, Access and PowerPoint.  Real-world projects or personal and professional use are incorporated into this class.  Credit received in this class will be transferable to other Colorado colleges.  
Though the course number indicates semester one (S1), the class may be scheduled either first or second semester.
IB Film Standard Level (SL) and IB Film Higher Level (HL)

IB Film may be taken as a one-year SL Course with assessments submitted at the end of the year, or taken as a two-year sequence for IB Film HL with assessments submitted at the end of the second year. This course fulfills the Group 6 requirements for the IB Diploma Programme and is open to IB Course students on an availability basis. Submission of the Course Student Commitment Form to the IB office, room C120, is required at the beginning of the course.

 IB Film SL - 70749S1 and 70749S2

Credit: 1.0
Grades:  11 or 12

Prerequisite: One of the following courses is highly recommended - Multimedia I, Multimedia II or Photography 

IB Film HL- 70750S1 and 70750S2

This is the second year in a two-year sequence, following IB Film SL.

Credit: 1.0
Grades:  12

Prerequisite: Successful completion of IB Film SL and teacher recommendation.

Course Descriptions          

  • The Diploma Programme film course explores film history, theory and socio-culture background through the study and analysis of film texts and exercises in film-making.
  • The course develops students’ critical abilities, enabling them to appreciate the multiplicity of cultural and historical perspectives in film.
  • To achieve an international understanding within the world of film, students are taught to consider film texts, theories and ideas from the points of view of different individuals, nations and cultures.
  • The Diploma Programme film course aims to develop students’ skills so that they become adept in both interpreting and making film texts. All IB Film assessments are project based.
  • Students in HL are expected to complete extensions of the core units adding depth and breadth the second year of study.
Creative Writing - 50470


Credit:  0.5 English Elective Credit
Grade:  9 - 12 
Prerequisite:  None

This semester long course will teach and practice the skills of creative writing in both poetry and prose.  The course will be divided into a quarter of poetry and a quarter of fiction.  Students will write their own original works and edit/comment on other student’s original works.  Students will also read and analyze works by past & contemporary authors. This course will also briefly discuss getting published.


Science Fiction & Fantasy – 50610 
     


Credit:  0.5 English Elective 
Grade:  9 - 12 
Prerequisite:  None


This course is a study of science fiction and fantasy literature, as well as other genres included in Speculative Fiction. Students will read extensively from classic and modern writers, write responses to literature, discuss the prominent themes and prepare a variety of literary projects. Time will also be spent discussing impacts of these genres on culture, media, and society at large.


Philosophy – 50908 - Spring semester only 

Credit: 0.5 Elective Credit
Grades:  11-12

This course will introduce students to some of the “classics” of western philosophy. We will read and discuss some of the most influential thinkers in the history of western philosophy. The readings will span more than two thousand years of western thought in which students will see how important philosophical ideas have changed over time.  Perhaps the most important thing to be gained from this class is not an acquaintance with various facts and theories from the history of philosophy, but the development of reasoning skills.  The study of philosophy develops one's ability to think carefully and critically. The objective of this course is to enable students to be reflective about the beliefs that they or their society have developed.


Contemporary World Issues - 85745


Credit: 0.5 Social Studies Elective Credit
Grades: 11-12
Prerequisite: None


Topics that will be covered, but not limited to, are: US-Middle East foreign policy, human rights struggles around the world, energy usage and resources, the United States debt, the effects of technology on well-being, the study of happiness, and Colorado political and economic issues. Students will be required to stay current on world, national, and local issues of importance.  This upper level course will focus on the analysis and interpretation of contemporary domestic and world issues. Students will examine current events through themes such as Power, Conflict, Justice, and Technology. Debate, research, discussion, critical thinking, and media analysis are all skills that will be applied during the course of the semester. 

Intro to Positive Psychology - 85757

Credit: 0.5 Elective Credit
Grades: 11-12
Prerequisite: Semester of General Psychology or semester of AP Psychology


Introduction to Positive Psychology is a semester course for juniors and seniors.  Introductory Psychology or a semester of AP Psychology will be a prerequisite.  The class will tackle content with psychological research-based facts, studies, and exercises that deal with what it takes to gain positive well-being in the short-term and long-term.  Topic will include, but are not limited to: identifying one’s character strengths, identifying one’s personality traits, optimism, gratitude, how to experience positive emotions, how to have positive relationships, how to be engaged, and answering the call of your “dark side.” 

Peer Intern - 40426

Credit:  0.5 Elective Credit
Grades:  9-12
Prerequisite:  Counselor Recommendation & approval of Special Education instructor

This unique experience provides the opportunity for interaction with students who have significant/severe intellectual or developmental disabilities in the classroom.  Students are trained in philosophy to insure that all students are included in regular education classroom activities as well as to serve when needed in a tutorial role.  Appropriate for anyone wishing to make a difference in another student’s life.


Aide-Teacher - 48885 (fall semester) or 48886 (spring semester)

Credit: 0.25 Elective Credit 
Grade: 10-12 
Prerequisite: Application and recommendation from teacher - This course is not selected during the registration process.  Applications will be accepted at the beginning of each semester.

Teacher will give student projects. A pass/fail grade will be given. 


Peer Counseling I - 35400S1

Credit:  0.5 Elective Credit
Grade:  11 (1st Semester)
Prerequisite:  Minimum 2.5 GPA, written application, two teacher recommendations, and interview; Strongly encouraged: Child Psychology, Sociology, Psychology, and/or AP Psychology
Expenses:  $115 Fall Peer Counseling Retreat (optional)

The peer counseling program is designed to train peers in such areas as:  conflict mediation, group leadership, refusal skills, pro-social skills, student assistance, and other counseling techniques.  

This course is not selected during the registration process.  Student must submit an application for this course during the 2nd semester of their Sophomore (10th grade) year to the counseling supervisor(s).  A maximum of twenty eight (28) students will be selected for this class.


Peer Counseling Intern - 55750

Credit:  0.5 Elective Credit per semester
Grade:  11 & 12
Prerequisite:  Minimum 2.5 GPA, successful completion of Peer Counseling I with a "B" or higher grade, approval from the counseling supervisor.  Psychology, AP Psychology, and/or Intro to Positive Psychology taken concurrently is strongly recommended.
Expenses:  $115 Fall Peer Counseling Retreat 
(Optional)

Trained peer counselors are stationed in the Counseling Office to assist with student registration, guest tours of the school building, study skills/tutoring, giving presentations to other schools, peer counseling projects, liaison between the Link Program and the Counseling Department, working with students in group, and mediation/conflict resolution and assisting students in need of help.  Junior students will be enrolled in the course for the Spring Semester and senior students will be enrolled for the Fall Semester.

This course is not selected during the registration process.  You must get approval from the counseling supervisor(s) to move onto Peer Counseling Intern.  


Journalism I - 50406

Credits:  0.5 Elective Credit
Grades:  9-12

Note:  This course is highly recommended for 50413 Newspaper and 50420 Yearbook

This course will teach the techniques of journalistic writing: the news story, the feature, the editorial, reviews, columns and headlines. Students will learn interviewing techniques, the basics of magazine layout design and composition. Editing, broadcasting and podcasting skills will be learned. Fake news, and the rights and responsibilities of a free press will also be studied. 


Newspaper (Digital Media) - 50413S1 and 50413S2

Credit:  1.0 Elective Credit (May be repeated)
Grade:  9-12
Prerequisite:  Written application (form found on the TRHS Registration webpage)

This is the student media class responsible for many productions. In this class, students produce The Growl magazine, as they learn advanced methods of journalistic writing, graphic design, digital photography and advertising. Students also manage many social media accounts and websites. Students will produce the school's GTV broadcast and live stream sporting events. 

Yearbook - 50420S1 and 50420S2

Credit:  1.0 Elective Credit
Grades:  9-12

Prerequisite:  Written application and 2 teacher recommendations (forms found on the TRHS Registration webpage)

In the Yearbook course, students will learn several of the following skills: page design using Adobe InDesign, the business of publishing, copy writing, editing and photography. The TRHS Yearbook staff produces a creative and exciting yearbook which records school memories and events, and will train students to work under strict, professional deadlines. We put a great emphasis on journalistic integrity! All grade levels are welcome to apply, but anyone interested in the class must fill out application and recommendation forms before registration concludes, and turn them in to Mr. Weldon in C220.

Student Government - 35450S1 and 35450S2 

Credit: 1.0 Elective Credit
Grades: 9-12
Prerequisite:   Selection process - includes a written application, teacher recommendation, presentation of a speech, and an election by peers in the Spring

Students will explore concepts of leadership and develop leadership techniques through school activities, which promote school spirit and community service. Homecoming, dances, pep rallies and charity events comprise the bulk of the projects during the year. Teamwork is an integral part of the class.

This course is not selected during the registration process. It is listed here for informational purposes only.  Those who successfully complete the selection process will be enrolled in the class.  Interested students may contact the Student Government Advisor for more details.  Information will be distributed to incoming Ranch View students in the Spring.


Multimedia I - Survey Course - 30575

Credit:  0.5 Practical Art Credit
Grades:  9-12
Prerequisite:  None
Expense:  Course fee of $35 per semester (all fees subject to change pending BOE approval)

Students will survey six media areas to compare, analyze, and will combine various multimedia software to determine their relationship. This course for computer literate students focuses on using a variety of software to develop multimedia productions. Students will create professional multimedia presentations that incorporate text, graphics, video, and sound. Students will be able to effectively maneuver through cyberspace, research, collect information, and be able to output that information in a professional, media-rich manner.  Students will have the opportunity to apply these skills while using advanced hardware and professional software. Students will also use design techniques to help create web pages and add to their videos


Multimedia II - Video Production - 31000

Credit: 0.5 Practical Art Credit
Grades: 9-12
Prerequisites: Multimedia I or teacher approval
Expense:  Course fee of $35 
(all fees subject to change pending BOE approval)

This semester-long course addresses both the technical and the journalistic aspects of broadcast journalism.  Students will focus on the content, style and technical aspects of broadcast journalism.  Topics also include general script writing, planning, use of camera shots and editing.  Students will learn how to write for broadcast, create video packages,  as well as how to operate cameras and lighting equipment.  Students will also create a variety of projects including a documentary, music videos, and short films.

Although this course is suitable for anyone interested in journalism, it is geared towards those who wish to be well prepared for assuming roles on the high school broadcast staff. It is also excellent preparation for IB Film. 


Multimedia II – Gaming/Programming (visual effects/design) – 31005

Credit: 0.5 Practical Art Credit
Grades: 9-12
Prerequisites: Multimedia I or Graphic Design I
Expense:  Course fee of $35 
(all fees subject to change pending BOE approval)

Create eye-catching video game scenes as you learn to apply design principles in simulated 3-D spaces.  Students will develop visual communication skills and ideation using traditional pencil and paper media, then transfer game visuals to the computer using Photoshop, Illustrator, and Cinema 4D software.  Storyboarding, character design, virtual environments, vehicle design, and basic animation will be addressed in a curriculum that emphasizes the importance of visual impact in the growing gaming industry. 

Multimedia II – 3D Animation – 31010

Credit:  0.5 Practical Art Credit
Grades:  9-12
Prerequisite:  Multimedia I or teacher approval 
Expense:  Course fee of $35 per semester (all fees subject to change pending BOE approval)

This course focuses on using advanced software applications for developing 2 and 3 dimensional animations.  Upon completion of this course, students will have the fundamental skills to create animated short movies and may take it more than one semester.


Multimedia II - Web Design - 30601

Credit:  0.5 Practical Art Credit
Grades:  9-12
Prerequisite:  None
Expense:  Course fee of $35 per semester (all fees subject to change pending BOE approval)

Students will move beyond the introductory level of electronic media for students to learn intermediate skills in web design. This course is a hands-on introduction to web techniques including: HTML, Dreamweaver, Fireworks, and Flash.  Students will also be introduced to web database technology, explore career options with the web design/development field, and create websites for mock clients.  Upon completion of this course, students will be able to create a complete website from start to finish reflecting a basic understanding of design and development practices.


Multimedia III - Advanced Video Game Art and Design - 31020

Credit: 0.5 Practical Art Credit
Grades: 10-12
Prerequisite: 
 Multimedia  II: Gaming/Programming
Expense: Course fee of $35 per semester (all fees subject to change pending BOE approval)

Students continue the creation and refinement of storyboarding, character design, environments, and vehicle design. Clay models will be formed and then reproduced in the computer using Cinema 4D software.  Animation of 3D models will be investigated.


Programming and Mobile Apps - 30460

Credit: 0.5 Elective Credit
Grades: 10-12
Prerequisite: Multimedia I

This course teaches skills in one of the fastest growing areas of computer programming.  It is an introduction to building applications for mobile devices that use Apple’s iOS operating system and for mobile devices that use the Android operating system.  Student’s will be exposed to both platforms.  Students will first be introduced to MIT App Inventor as a blocks-based programming tool that allows everyone, even novices, to start programming and build fully functional apps for Android devices.  Java programming language and Eclipse IDE will be used for developing further Android apps.   Objective C programming language and X-code will be used for iPhone apps.  This course is for anyone with basic familiarity with computer programming who wants to learn how to get started with mobile application development.


Though the course number indicates semester one (S1), the class may be scheduled either first or second semester.


Introduction to Engineering – 80345 

Credit:  0.5 Practical Art Credit
Grades: 9-12
Prerequisite: Algebra I
Expense:  Course fee of $50  
(all fees subject to change pending BOE approval); TI-83 or higher graphing calculator recommended

Introduction to Engineering is a semester long class.  This class is designed to open the door to the principles of engineering as described by the American Society of Engineering Education (ASEE). Students will be working in groups that will perform several engineering projects that will help the student understand and experience what engineers do.  Topics of study will include:

 

  • Engineering design
  • Application of science and technology in engineering
  • The scope of engineering
  • Communication involved with engineering
  • How engineering addresses the needs of society

 

Projects include building structures, designing devices from Lego kits, and designing and programing industrial robots. Students completing this course can move on to more advanced engineering courses in the future.  Though the course number indicates semester one (S1), the class may be scheduled either first or second semester.


Engineering I - 80332


Credit: 0.5 Practical Art Credit

Grades: 10-12

Prerequisite: Introduction to Engineering
Expense:  Course fee of $50 
(all fees subject to change pending BOE approval)


Engineering 1 is a semester long class.  This class is designed to thoroughly explore the principles of engineering as described by the American Society of Engineering Education (ASEE). The students will not only design projects but use modeling Fischertechniks to predict if their designs will work. Students will explore modeling Fischertechniks involving center of mass, force of tension and compression and electronics.  Performing these engineering projects extends students' understanding and experiences with what engineers do.  Students will thoroughly explore topics of: 

  • Engineering design
  • Application of science and technology in engineering
  • The scope of engineering
  • Communication involved with engineering
  • How engineering addresses the needs of society

 Projects include designing structures, model airplanes, electronic devices and remote controlled vehicles.


Engineering II - 80334

Credit: 0.5 Practical Art Credit
Grades: 10-12
Prerequisite: Introduction to Engineering and Engineering I
Expense:  Course fee of $50 
(all fees subject to change pending BOE approval)

Engineering II is a semester long class.  This class is designed to apply the principles of engineering as described by the American Society of Engineering Education (ASEE) to real world situations.  The course will model a real engineering company.  Students will select a field of engineering to focus on and work as a department within that community.  The different departments must work together to accomplish real world tasks.  Students will have to manage time, budget and supplies to successfully accomplish their tasks.

Students will thoroughly explore topics of:
  • Engineering design
  • Application of science and technology in engineering
  • The scope of engineering
  • Communication involved with engineering
  • How engineering addresses the needs of society
Projects will incorporate kits and resources from Introduction to Engineering and Engineering I.  Students will also exploit 3D printing and laser cutting devices to make unique, one of a kind parts to modify and connect different kits for a common goal.

Engineering III - 80336

Credit: 0.5 Practical Art Credit
Grades:  10-12
Prerequisites:
  The students must complete the three previous semesters of the engineering program (Introduction to Engineering, Engineering 1 and Engineering 2).
Expense:  Course fee of $50 (all fees subject to change pending BOE approval)

Engineering 3 is the culminating class of a four semester curriculum.
  • Semester 1: Introduction to Engineering
  • Semester 2: Engineering 1
  • Semester 3: Engineering 2
  • Semester 4: Engineering 3

This class will allow the students an opportunity to experience a culminating test of their engineering skills. The class will provide them with a great picture of what engineering is about.  The class will model an engineering firm that researches a need, develops and designs a proposal, executes that proposal and builds a product. The class will be broken into different departments that works on different aspects of the product. Throughout the class each department must maintain thorough communication with each other to complete the product.  Though the course number indicates semester one (S1), the class may be scheduled either first or second semester.


IB Film Standard Level (SL) and IB Film Higher Level (HL)

IB Film may be taken as a one-year SL Course with assessments submitted at the end of the year, or taken as a two-year sequence for IB Film HL with assessmentssubmitted at the end of the second year. This course fulfills the Group 6 requirements for the IB Diploma Programme and is open to IB Course students on an availability basis. Submission of the Course Student Commitment Form to the IB office, room C120, is required at the beginning of the course.

 IB Film SL - 70749S1 and 70749S2

Credit: 1.0
Grades:  11 or 12

Prerequisite: One of the following courses is highly recommended - Multimedia I, Multimedia II or Photography 

IB Film HL- 70750S1 and 70750S2

This is the second year in a two-year sequence, following IB Film SL.

Credit: 1.0
Grades:  12

Prerequisite: Successful completion of IB Film SL and teacher recommendation.

Course Descriptions          

  • The Diploma Programme film course explores film history, theory and socio-culture background through the study and analysis of film texts and exercises in film-making.
  • The course develops students’ critical abilities, enabling them to appreciate the multiplicity of cultural and historical perspectives in film.
  • To achieve an international understanding within the world of film, students are taught to consider film texts, theories and ideas from the points of view of different individuals, nations and cultures.
  • The Diploma Programme film course aims to develop students’ skills so that they become adept in both interpreting and making film texts. All IB Film assessments are project based.
  • Students in HL are expected to complete extensions of the core units adding depth and breadth the second year of study.

Intervention Courses 
A teacher recommendation is required. These courses are not selected during the registration process.  Students will be enrolled in the courses listed below at the beginning of the semester.  

Study Skills (Successful Learning Habits) – 40580S1 or 40580S2

Credit: 0.25 per semester Elective Credit
Grades:  9 - 10
Prerequisite: n/a

This class is offered to Freshmen and a limited number of Sophomores. The intent of this course is to teach all Freshman students how to be a successful student during their high school career. Study Skills is designed to support students in three main areas: organization, TRHS basics, and self-knowledge. 
This course is not selected during the registration process.

Under the category of organization, students will learn to:

  • Use their TRHS planner or other organizational tools
  • Keep their binders and back packs organized
  • Set short-term and long-term goals
  • Make To Do lists and priorities
  • Check grades on a weekly basis
  • Communicate with teachers
  •  Students will have the opportunity to improve their skills in technology by learning to:
    • Use all aspects of infinite campus confidently
    • Email teachers properly, consistently and independently
    • Make power point presentations
    • Use Google Docs
    • Use Moodle
    • Use Naviance
  • Finally, under the category of self-knowledge, students will learn about:
    • Learning styles
    • Multi-intelligent styles
    • Recent brain research
    • Self Advocacy
    • Habits of Learning
    • Restorative Circles
    • College and Career Exploration

*In addition to learning skills necessary to be successful in high school and beyond, students will have individual time to organize, study, complete assignments, communicate with teachers, and obtain unfinished assignments or make up work.


School Success - 40501

Credit:  0.5 Elective Credit
Grade: 10-12

This course is not selected during the registration process, a teacher recommendation is required.  Please contact Matt McGregor with any questions.

School Success is an elective course for students in grades 10-12. Students focus on goal setting, problem-solving, self-advocating, and self progress monitoring. Through the course, students create goals for their overall academic well-being and monitor their progress towards these goals. Additional school success strategies are integrated to promote success on student goals. Student Social and Emotional well-being is also a core component of the course. 
Read/Write Strategies - 40576S1 and 40576S2

Credit: 1.0  (Year) or 0.5 (Semester 1) Elective Credit        
Grades: 9-12  
Prerequisite: Non-proficiency in standards and/or low reading/writing skills; teacher recommendation

This course is not selected during the registration process, a teacher recommendation is required.  Please contact Matt McGregor with any questions.

This two-semester course is required for students who have not shown reading proficiency through the state testing or other measures. It is designed to increase students abilities to read and comprehend increasingly difficult material. Through specific instruction based on individual needs, students will be taught reading strategies to increase comprehension and motivation. Students will use writing as a tool to communicate responses and reactions to reading. Though at times whole group instruction will be necessary, the primary focus of the class is differentiated, individualized instruction determined by on-going assessment of student needs. Students who have not demonstrated reading proficiency will be enrolled in Reading/Writing Strategies for two semesters, although students who show proficiency at the end of one semester will be able to exit the class at that time. The class will be open to additional enrollment only when space is available after all required students have been enrolled.  


 Humanities Block Courses--Freshmen

NOTE:  All freshman students are required to take either a regular or honors Humanities Block combining English and History.

Regular Path take:

English I / American History  (Register for both)

   

English I - 50300S1 and 50300S2

           AND

            US History: 1865 – Present (American History) - 85650S1 and 85650S2                        

Credit:  2.0
Grade:  9
Prerequisite:  None
Expense:  Students will be responsible for purchasing recommended vocabulary workbook from an outside source. 

This course is an interdisciplinary Humanities block, with focus on the United States in the 19th and 20th centuries, incorporating American literature, art, and culture.  Students examine the impact of America’s domestic and foreign policy on our nation and the world.  The course will emphasize the ideas and actions of people who have shaped the world of yesterday and today and who will influence the world of tomorrow.  

Honors Path take:

English I Honors/American History Honors (Register for both)

     English I Honors - 50310S1 and 50310S2

           AND

                   Honors US History: 1865-Present - 85552S1 and 85552S2

Credit:  2.0
Grade:  9
Prerequisite:  Teacher recommendation

Expense:  Students will be responsible for purchasing recommended vocabulary workbook 
an outside source

This course is an interdisciplinary Humanities block; however, the Honors course challenges students to go beyond the traditional curricular study to pursue a more in-depth investigation of the content. The course is demanding and will require a greater commitment of time and effort.  Students should also expect to read texts of greater volume and difficulty.  This course will focus on preparing students for future Advanced Placement classes.

Students who are planning to take Advanced Placement or International Baccalaureate classes during high school are encouraged to enroll in honors courses.  Honors courses are specifically designed to develop reading, writing, and critical thinking skills that support success in higher level courses and post-secondary success.


Humanities Block Courses--Sophomores

NOTE:  This is an optional Honors Humanities Block for sophomores combining Honors English II and Honors Ancient World History/Geography.

Honors Path take:

English II Honors/Honors Ancient World History/Geography (Register for both) 

   English II Honors – 50340S1 and 50340S2

              AND

                Honors World History/Honors Geography - 85450S1 and 85837

Credit:  2.0
Grade:  10
Prerequisite:  Teacher recommendation
Expense:  
Students will be responsible for purchasing recommended vocabulary workbook 
an outside source.

This course is an interdisciplinary Humanities block; however, the Honors course challenges students to go beyond the traditional curricular study to pursue a more in-depth investigation of the content. The course is demanding and will require a greater commitment of time and effort.  Students should also expect to read texts of greater volume and difficulty.  This course will focus on preparing students for future Advanced Placement classes.

Students who are planning to take Advanced Placement or International Baccalaureate classes during high school are encouraged to enroll in honors courses.  Honors courses are specifically designed to develop reading, writing, and critical thinking skills that support success in higher level courses and post-secondary success.


English & Communication Courses -- Non Humanities Block Courses




English I - 50300S1 and 50300S2


Cr
edit:  1.0
Grade:  9
Prerequisite:  Teacher approval
Expense:  Students will be responsible for purchasing recommended vocabulary workbook an outside source.

American Literature will emphasize the Civil War period to the present in American Literature with emphasis on achieving the Douglas County Language Arts Standards.   Preparatory twenty-first century skills for post-secondary education and success will be implemented and practiced.

English II - 50330S1 and 50330S2


Credit:  1.0
Grade:  10
Prerequisite:  Teacher approval
Expense:  
Students will be responsible for purchasing recommended vocabulary workbook 
an outside source.

World Literature studies the ancient and medieval in mythology, novels, poetry, and plays with emphasis on achieving the Douglas County Standards.  Preparatory twenty-first century skills for post-secondary education and success will be implemented and practiced.


English II Honors - 50340S1 and 50340S2


Credit:  1.0
Grade:  10
Prerequisite: None 
Expense:  
Students will be responsible for purchasing recommended vocabulary workbook 
an outside source.

World Literature studies the ancient and medieval in mythology, novels, poetry, and plays with emphasis on achieving the Douglas County Standards.  The Honors class challenges students to go beyond the traditional curricular study to pursue a more in-depth study of the content. The course is demanding and will require a greater commitment of time and effort Students should also expect to read texts of greater volume and difficulty.  This course will focus on preparing students for future Advanced Placement classes.


English III - 50360S1 and 50360S2


Credit:  1.0
Grades:  11 - 12
Prerequisite:  None
Expense:  
Students will be responsible for purchasing recommended vocabulary workbook.

This course will emphasize the diverse literary and cultural traditions that coincide with the economic, geographic and government developments in Modern World History from 1600 to the present.  Readings will include novels, poems, plays and non-fiction texts.  Preparatory twenty-first century skills for post-secondary education and success will be implemented and practiced.


English IV - 50440S1 and 50440S2


Credit:  1.0
Grade:  12
Prerequisite:  None
Expense:  
Students will be responsible for purchasing recommended vocabulary workbook.

Through the study of Contemporary American Literature, students will refine their skills in research, reading and writing.  Course of study will revolve around recent literary developments in America and the events, beliefs and theories informing the literature of this period.  Students will complete the senior project.  Preparatory twenty-first century skills for post-secondary education and success will be implemented and practiced. 


Creative Writing - 50470


Credit:  0.5 English Elective Credit
Grade:  9-12 
Prerequisite:  None

This semester long course will teach and practice the skills of creative writing in both poetry and prose.  The course will be divided into a quarter of poetry and a quarter of fiction.  Students will write their own original works and edit/comment on other student’s original works.  Students will also read and analyze works by past & contemporary authors. This course will also briefly discuss getting published.


Science Fiction & Fantasy – 50610
 
                                                                                       


Credit:  0.5 English Elective Credit
Grade:  9-12
Prerequisite:  None

This course is a study of science fiction and fantasy literature, as well as other genres included in Speculative Fiction. Students will read extensively from classic and modern writers, write responses to literature, discuss the prominent themes and prepare a variety of literary projects. Time will also be spent discussing impacts of these genres on culture, media, and society at large.


ACC College Composition (ENG121) - 69025S1 CE


Credit: 0.5 credit/ ACC 3 credit hours. Students will receive both high school and college credit.
Grade: 12 only
Prerequisite: Score on the Accuplacer score of 95+ in sentence skills and 80+ in Reading, an ACT English score of 18 and Reading score of 17, or an SAT English score of 440
Expense: Students will be responsible for purchasing the required ACC textbooks, 
new or used, and an online grammar book.

This is a fall semester class that is taught in accordance with LIT115 in the spring. This course emphasizes the planning, writing, and revising of compositions, including the development of critical and logical thinking skills. This course includes a minimum of five compositions that stress analytical, evaluative, and persuasive/argument writing, including application of the research process, grammatical and mechanical correctness, and MLA formatting. Students will also be required to do the Senior Project along with the rest of the senior class.


ACC College Introduction to Literature (LIT115) - 69027S2 CE

Credit: 0.5 credit/ ACC 3 credit hours. Students will receive both high school and college credit.
Grade: 12 only
Prerequisite: required scores for ENG121 and a passing grade in ENG121.
Expenses:  Students will be responsible for purchasing the novels covered in the course.
 
Course will cover roughly four novels and one play. 

This class is taught in the spring after ENG121 and provides an introduction to academic literature at a college level. Students will participate in close readings of novels, short stories, poetry, and one drama. Students will also be required to engage in literary analysis, historical analysis, and social/philosophical discourse, including speaking and writing. Senior Project will be completed as well.



Advanced Placement Language and Composition - 50390S1 and 50390S2


Credit:  1.0
Grade:  11
Expenses:  Because AP Language is a college level elective; students are encouraged to purchase the textbook for the course (in accordance with the Douglas County Board of Education policy). 
AP Exam:  Students enrolled in the course are expected to take the National AP Exam in May (Approximately $93).

The cornerstone of the Advanced Placement English Language and Composition course is practice in the use of rhetoric and composition with a particular emphasis on argumentative, expository, and narrative forms.  Close, critical reading and discussion of texts representing a variety of genres and periods, coupled with careful writing employing several compositional approaches will inculcate the analytical and creative skills necessary for success on the AP exam.

Advanced Placement courses allow students to take the challenge of college-level courses while in the familiar surroundings of their high school.  AP courses develop advanced reading, writing, and thinking skills that benefit students in their post-secondary pursuits.  These courses require work outside the classroom, during summer and breaks.  Students should consider their academic, social, work, and extra-curricular activities before undertaking the commitment of an Advanced Placement course.  Students will not be allowed to drop an AP course after they have signed up and courses are scheduled. 

This is a one-year course; students may not drop at semester.   



Advanced Placement Literature and Composition - 50400S1 and 50400S2

Credit:  1.0
Grade:  12
Expense: Because AP Literature is a college level elective; students are encouraged to purchase the books for the course (in accordance with the Douglas County Board of Education policy). 
AP Exam:  Students enrolled in the course are expected to take the National AP Exam in May (Approximately $93).

AP English Literature and Composition is a college-level class that provides students with an academic experience equivalent to a freshman/sophomore college survey class of English Literature.  Students successfully mastering the course material may earn college credit by passing the AP English Literature Exam, which is administered annually.  Because this AP course is a college-level elective, students will be asked to purchase their materials in accordance with the Douglas County Board of Education policy.

Advanced Placement courses allow students to take the challenge of college-level courses while in the familiar surroundings of their high school.  AP courses develop advanced reading, writing, and thinking skills that benefit students in their post-secondary pursuits.  These courses require work outside the classroom, during Summer and breaks.  Students should consider their academic, social, work, and extra-curricular activities before undertaking the commitment of an Advanced Placement course.  Students will not be allowed to drop an AP course after they have signed up and courses are scheduled. 

This is a one-year course; students may not drop at semester.   


International Baccalaureate: Group 1: Language A

IB English (Higher Level) HL I and HL II

IB English HL is a two year sequence with IB exams at the end of the second year.   This course fulfills the Group 1 requirements for the IB Diploma Programme and is open to IB Course students on an availability basis.  Submission of the Course Student Commitment form to the IB Office, room C120, is required at the beginning of the course.

Credit: 2.0
Grade:  11 and 12

Class Expenses: It is highly recommended that students purchase the novels covered in IB English HL I and HL II. Novels are available for check out.

IB English HL I – 50355S1 and 50355S2 (Junior Year)
This is the first year of a two-year sequence. Students selecting this course during the junior year are committed to completing the senior year of the two-year sequence.

IB English HL II – 11505S1 and 11505S2 (Senior Year)
Prerequisite: Successful completion of IB English HL I

Course description:
  •  IB English is a required course for IB Diploma students.  It is the second year of a two-year sequence.
  • Students will read, discuss, and write about selected works of world literature of recognized literary merit.  Personal response and original thinking are emphasized.
  • Promotes an appreciation of literature and a knowledge of the student’s own culture along with that of other societies.
  • Develops the student’s powers of expression, both in oral and written communication.
  • Emphasizes the skills involved in writing and speaking in a variety of styles and situations.
  • Offers the student the opportunity to read 11-15 works grouped by genres.  Works are chosen from a broad list of prescribed authors and works representing different literary periods, genres, and regions in the English language, as well as literature in translation.

Family & Consumer Science

  
Personal Finance - 55500

Credit:  0.5 Practical Art Credit
Grades:  9-12
Prerequisite:  none
Expenses:  none

If the prospect of being totally responsible for yourself presents a challenge, Personal Finance has all the answers. This class is designed for those students who will soon handle economic and life management issues independently. Units of study include career preparation, budgeting, credit, consumerism, housing and transportation options, and insurance. This is an academically challenging project based class which revolves around the individual. Life moves faster than you think. Be confident and prepared! Meets graduation requirements in Practical Arts.


Interior Design I - 55425

Credit:  0.5 Practical Art Credit
Grades:  9-12
Prerequisite:  none
Expense:  Course fee of $20 per semester (all fees subject to change pending BOE approval)

Investigate careers in the exciting and growing field of interior design through a project oriented, hands-on class. Opportunities are presented to design structural space and experiment with actual samples to create attractive and functional living spaces using the elements and principles of design. Meets graduation requirements in Practical Arts.


Interior Design II - 55430 

Credit: 0.5 Practical Art Credit
Grades: 9-12
Prerequisite:  Interior Design I
Expense:  Course fee of $20 per semester (all fees subject to change pending BOE approval)

Students enrolled in this project-based class will continue exploring the exciting and diverse field of interior design. Students will enrich their knowledge of design principles by arranging interior spaces for commercial buildings. Students will demonstrate their knowledge of these topics by completing projects that meet professional standards. Meets graduation requirements in Practical Arts.


Fashion Design I – 55400

Credit: 0.5 Practical Art Credit
Grades:  9-12
Prerequisite: none
Expense:  Course fee of $20 per semester (all fees subject to change pending BOE approval)

This is the first class of two that explores the fashion and retail apparel industry. It examines past, present, and future fashion trends, basic design terms, and the design process. Students will create innovative designs while incorporating the elements and principles of design. Various illustration techniques and different career opportunities will be explored. Meets graduation requirements in Practical Arts.


Fashion Design II – 55410  

Credit: 0.5 Practical Art Credit
Grades:  9-12
Prerequisite: Fashion Design I
Expense:  Course fee of $20 per semester (all fees subject to change pending BOE approval)

This is the second class of two exploring the fashion industry. Students will develop their knowledge and understanding of the elements and principles of design and will focus on independent design projects that offer the opportunity for true creativity. A combination of design projects, clothing construction and the evaluation of fabrics and processes are just a few of the many areas covered in this course. Meets graduation requirements in Practical Arts.


Child Development and Psychology - 55759

Credit:  0.5 Practical Art Credit
Grades: 9-12
Prerequisite:  none
Expenses:  none

Whether there is an interest in working with children, applying knowledge to a future family, or even learning more about younger family members, this course is designed to introduce students to early childhood development. It provides an overview of intellectual, physical, social, and emotional development from birth to elementary age. In addition, parenting and prenatal development are essential components to the course. An exciting aspect of this course is getting the opportunity to participate in the infant simulator. Meets graduation requirements in Practical Arts.


Relationships - 55310

Credit:  0.5 Practical Art Credit
Grades:  9-12
Prerequisite:  None
Expenses:  none

The focus of this course is on the family, understanding yourself and others, and being able to recognize the components of a healthy and satisfying relationship. Learning about personal relationships and marital relationships will help you understand the fundamental elements required to build a healthy family unit. This course also covers the principles of effective communication and offers coping strategies for everyday life. Meets graduation requirements in Practical Arts.


Culinary Nutrition - 55378

Credit: 0.5 Practical Art Credit
Grades: 9-12
Prerequisite: None
Expense:  Course fee of $40 per semester (all fees subject to change pending BOE approval)

Culinary Nutrition will develop lifelong, healthy individuals with an understanding of healthy and nutritious preparation techniques utilizing various resources and skills.  Emphasis is placed on implementing healthy nutritional choices, preparing nutrient-dense seasonal foods, sports nutrition, exploring careers related to culinary nutrition, and practicing wise consumer decisions.  In addition, students will develop skills in safety and sanitation and basic food preparation techniques.  Meets graduation requirements in Practical Arts.

Catering 1- 55338 

Credit: 0.5 Practical Art Credit
Grades: 9-12
Expense:  Course fee of $40 per semester (all fees subject to change pending BOE approval)

This is an introductory course in food preparation and food related industries for the beginner.  This is required for students desiring to take later advanced food offerings. Students will develop skills in safety and sanitation, basic food preparation techniques such as knife skills, baking, cooking methods, creative meal planning, plate presentation and food service in weekly food labs.  This class also explores food cultures from around the world. Meets graduation requirements in Practical Arts.


Catering 2- 55339

Credit: 0.5 Practical Art Credit
Grades: 9-12
Expense:  Course fee of $40 per semester (all fees subject to change pending BOE approval)

This is an intermediate culinary class that expands on techniques and skills, providing students with the  opportunity to expand on their own culinary expertise, cater events, and discover food traditions from around the world. Students will apply their knowledge in numerous culinary areas through weekly labs. This is a perfect intermediate class for students interested in entering the restaurant, hospitality, or lodging fields. Meets graduation requirements in Practical Arts.


PROSTART PROGRAM                                                                                                                
Click on the link below to access the Pro Start website:

https://sites.google.com/a/dcsdk12.org/thunderridge-high-school-prostart/home

ProStart I (year 1 of 2 year program) - 55330S1 and 55330S2
HTE 1533 Food Fundamentals

Concurrent enrollment with Metro State University 
This course receives both high school and college credit.

Credit: 1.0 Practical Art Credit / 3.0 MSU Credits
Grades: 11-12 (recommended for 11th)
Prerequisite:  None, but highly recommend Catering I or II, OR Culinary Nutrition
Expense:  Course fee of $45 per semester / $90 for the year (all fees subject to change pending BOE approval)

ProStart is a food service hospitality management program.  ProStart covers topics such as: management, communication, nutrition, marketing, global cuisine, cost control, and cooking methods. The course is offered to juniors and seniors. Juniors are encouraged to take ProStart 2 their senior year (both semesters) to finish the two-year program & earn their ProStart Certificate of Achievement.

ProStart is a nationally certified program that introduces students to a wide variety of careers in the hospitality industry.  The curriculum is based on a study of food preparation, lodging, customer service and business management.  Students can earn a national certificate that will give them college credit and scholarship opportunities.  To earn the ProStart certificate, students will need to take ProStart II the following year, obtain 400 hours of work experience (within the 2 years), earn a 70% or higher achievement in both classes, and pass both year 1 and year 2 national exams. Meets graduation requirements in Practical Arts.


ProStart II (year 2 of 2 year program) - 55335S1 and 55335S2
HTE 1603 Food Science

Concurrent enrollment with Metro State University 
This course receives both high school and college credit.

Credit: 1.0 Practical Art Credit / 3.0 MSU Credits
Grades: 11-12 (recommended for 12th)
Prerequisite:  None, but highly recommend Catering I or II, OR Culinary Nutrition
Expense:  Course fee of $45 per semester / $90 for the year (all fees subject to change pending BOE approval)

ProStart is a foodservice hospitality management program.  ProStart covers topics such as: management, communication, nutrition, marketing, global cuisine, cost control, and cooking methods. The course is offered to juniors and seniors. Juniors are encouraged to take ProStart 2 their senior year (both semesters) to finish out the two-year program & earn their ProStart Certificate of Achievement.

ProStart is a nationally certified program that introduces students to a wide variety of careers in the hospitality industry.  The curriculum is based on a study of food preparation, lodging, customer service and business management.  Students can earn a national certificate that will give them college credit and scholarship opportunities.  To earn the ProStart Certificate of Achievement, students will need to have completed ProStart 1 and 2, obtain 400 hours of work experience (within the 2 years), earn a 70% or higher in both classes, and pass both year 1 and year 2 national exams. Meets graduation requirements in Practical Arts.


ProStart I and II (1 year Accelerated program) - 55330S1 & 55330S2 AND 55335S1 & 55335S2

Concurrent enrollment with Metro State University 
This course receives both high school and college credit.

Credit: 2.0 Practical Art Credit / 6.0 MSU Credits
Grades: 11-12 (recommended for 12th)
Prerequisite: None, but highly recommend Catering I or II, OR Culinary Nutrition
Expense:  Course fee of $90 per semester / $180 for the year (all fees subject to change pending BOE approval)

ProStart is a food service hospitality management program.  ProStart covers topics such as: management, communication, nutrition, marketing, global cuisine, cost control, and cooking methods. Juniors are encouraged to take the “ProStart 2 year program” during both their junior & senior year to finish out the two-year program & earn their certificate. Seniors in this class will complete both year 1 and 2 curriculum in one “accelerated” and rigorous year. ProStart is a nationally certified program that introduces students to a wide variety of careers in the hospitality industry.  The curriculum is based on a study of food preparation, lodging, customer service and business management.  Students can earn a ProStart Certificate of Achievement that will give them college credit and scholarship opportunities.  To earn the national certificate, students will need to obtain 400 hours of work experience, earn a 70% or higher in both classes and pass both year 1 and year 2 national exams. Meets graduation requirements in Practical Arts.

International Baccalaureate: Group 1: Language A1 Literature


IB English (Higher Level) HL I and HL II

IB English HL is a two year sequence with IB exams at the end of the second year.   This course fulfills the Group 1 requirements for the IB Diploma Programme and is open to IB Course students on an availability basis.  Submission of the Course Student Commitment form to the IB Office, room C120, is required at the beginning of the course.

Credit: 2.0
Grade:  11 and 12

Class Expenses: It is highly recommended that students purchase the novels covered in IB English HL I and HL II. Novels are available for check out.

IB English HL I – 50355S1 and 50355S2 (Junior Year)
This is the first year of a two-year sequence. Students selecting this course during the junior year are committed to completing the senior year of the two-year sequence.

IB English HL II – 11505S1 and 11505S2 (Senior Year)
Prerequisite: Successful completion of IB English HL I

Course description:
  •  IB English is a required course for IB Diploma students.  It is the second year of a two-year sequence.
  • Students will read, discuss, and write about selected works of world literature of recognized literary merit.  Personal response and original thinking are emphasized.
  • Promotes an appreciation of literature and a knowledge of the student’s own culture along with that of other societies.
  • Develops the student’s powers of expression, both in oral and written communication.
  • Emphasizes the skills involved in writing and speaking in a variety of styles and situations.
  • Offers the student the opportunity to read 11-15 works grouped by genres.  Works are chosen from a broad list of prescribed authors and works representing different literary periods, genres, and regions in the English language, as well as literature in translation.

International Baccalaureate Group 2: Language B (Second Language)


IB Spanish ab initio SL I     95601S1 and 95601S2 (Jr. year)

IB Spanish ab initio SL II    95602S1 and 95602S2 (Sr. year)

Credit: 2.0
Grades: 11 and 12

ONLY AVAILABLE TO FULL DIPLOMA JUNIORS FOR SL1 AND SENIORS FOR SL 2. This course fulfills the Group 2 requirements for the IB Diploma Programme.

Prerequisites: Student must be enrolled in the IB Diploma Programme.  No previous Spanish experience.

 Course description:

  • A two-year course sequence at the Standard Level only.
  • A world language course for students with little or no previous experience in the target language.
  • Provides an opportunity for students to further their linguistic skills by taking up a second foreign language, or for students to learn a foreign language for the first time.
  • Concentrates on the acquisition of language necessary for practical communication in a variety of everyday situations.
  • Develops the four primary skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing.
  • Enables students to acquire a basic awareness of the culture(s) related to the language through the study of a core-syllabus and a language-specific syllabus.

IB Spanish V SL – 95662S1 and 95662S2

This course fulfills the Group 2 requirements for the IB Diploma Programme and is open to IB Course students on an availability basis. Submission of the Course Student Commitment Form to the IB office, room C120, is required at the beginning of the course.

Credit: 1.0
Grades: 11 or 12

Prerequisites: Successful completion of Spanish IV or teacher recommendation

 Course Description:

  • The principal aim is to enable students to use Spanish in a range of contexts.
  • Promotes an awareness, and sensitivity to the culture(s) related to the language studied.
  • Prepares students to use the language appropriately in a range of situations and contexts and for a variety of purposes.
  • Focuses on language acquisition and development in the four primary language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing.
  • Language skills are developed through the study and use of a range of written and spoken material, which extends from everyday oral exchanges to literary texts related to the culture(s) concerned.

IB French V SL – 95441S1 and 95441S2

This course fulfills the Group 2 requirements for the IB Diploma Programme and is open to IB Course students on an availability basis. Submission of the Course Student Commitment Form to the IB office, room C120, is required at the beginning of the course.

Credit: 1.0
Grades: 11 or 12

Prerequisites: Successful completion of French IV or teacher recommendation

 Course Description:

  • The principal aim is to enable students to use French in a range of contexts.
  • Promotes an awareness, and sensitivity to the culture(s) related to the language studied.
  • Prepares students to use the language appropriately in a range of situations and contexts and for a variety of purposes.
  • Focuses on language acquisition and development in the four primary language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing.
  • Language skills are developed through the study and use of a range of written and spoken material, which extends from everyday oral exchanges to literary texts related to the culture(s) concerned.

IB Chinese V SL – 95738S1 and 95738S2

This course fulfills the Group 2 requirements for the IB Diploma Programme and is open to IB Course students on an availability basis. Submission of the Course Student Commitment Form to the IB office, room C120, is required at the beginning of the course.

Credit: 1.0
Grades: 11 or 12

Prerequisites: Successful completion of Chinese IV or teacher recommendation

 Course Description:

  • The principal aim is to enable students to use Chinese in a range of contexts.
  • Promotes an awareness, and sensitivity to the culture(s) related to the language studied.
  • Prepares students to use the language appropriately in a range of situations and contexts and for a variety of purposes.
  • Focuses on language acquisition and development in the four primary language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing.
  • Language skills are developed through the study and use of a range of written and spoken material, which extends from everyday oral exchanges to literary texts related to the culture(s) concerned.

International Baccalaureate: Group 3 Individuals and Societies


IB European History HL I and IB 2Oth Century Europe HL II

IB History HL is a two year sequence with  IB exams at the end of the second year.  This course fulfills the Group 3 requirements for the IB Diploma Programme and is open to IB Course students on an availability basis. Submission of the Course Student Commitment Form to the IB office, room C120, is required at the beginning of the course.

Credit: 2.0
Grade:  11 and 12

IB European History HL I – 85516S1 and 85516S2
IB European History HL I is the first year of a two- year sequence. Students selecting HL courses during the junior year are committed to completing the senior year of the two-year sequence.

Credit:  Grade:  11
Prerequisites:  Recommended Honors History 9 and Honors History 10 or AP World History.

Course description:

  •  IB History is a required course for IB Diploma students. 
  • This course explores political, economic, social, and intellectual currents in the development of Europe from 1500-9160. 
  • Particular emphasis is given to the history of Europe since the Enlightenment Age.

IB 20th Century Europe HL II – 85805S1 and 85805S2
 This course is the second year of a two-year course sequence at the Higher Level.  It is also open to IB Course students as a one-year History SL course.

Grade:  11 or 12 for SL examination
Grade: 12 for HL

Prerequisite successful completion of IB European History HL I for testing HL.

Course description:

  • It is a required course for the International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme. 
  • This course will examine the nature of 20th century conflicts.  Focus will be on the Cold War and the creation of contemporary Europe. 
  • The course develops in studenst an international awareness and understanding by promoting empathy with, and understanding of people living in diverse places and at different times.

International Baccalaureate Group 4: Experimental Sciences


IB Environmental Systems/Societies SL - 80383S1 and 80383S2 

This course fulfills the Group 4 requirements for the IB Diploma Programme and is open to IB Course students on an availability basis. Submission of the Course Student Commitment Form to the IB office, room C120, is required at the beginning of the course.

Credit: 1.0
Grades:  11 or 12

Prerequisite:  Successful completion of Biology and/or Chemistry; The Honors pathway is recommended, but not required.

Course description:

  • IB Environmental Systems and Societies is an interdisciplinary course that provides a coherent perspective of the interrelationships between environmental systems and societies, allowing students to evaluate the scientific, ethical, and socio-political aspects of issues.  
  • Topics include ecosystems, biodiversity, population dynamics, pollution, Earth systems and resources, land and water use, energy resources, and global change. 
  • This course incorporates a hands-on approach to learning science.  Students will be expected to design and carry out experimental procedures as well as apply theoretical principles, and analyze experimental results.

IB Biology HL I – 80358S1 and 80358S2
IB Biology HL I is the first year of a two- year sequence. Students selecting HL courses during the junior year are committed to completing the senior year of the two-year sequence.

IB Biology  HL II – 80354S1 and 80354S2

IB Biology HL is a two-year sequence with IB exams at the end of the second year. 
This course fulfills the Group 4 requirements for the IB Diploma Programme and is open to IB Course students on an availability basis. Submission of the Course Student Commitment Form to the IB office, room C120, is required at the beginning of the course.

Credit: 2.0
Grade:  11 and 12

Prerequisites: Successful completion of Biology and/or Chemistry and/or Physics; The Honors pathway is recommended.

Course description: 

  • This course is a two-year course at the HL level only.
  • IB Biology emphasizes an investigative approach to science. Students will be expected to design and carry out experimental procedures, as well as apply theoretical principles and analyze results. 
  • Students also develop an awareness of moral and ethical issues, and examining local and global issues fosters a sense of social responsibility.
  • Studies the biology topics of cells, chemistry of life, genetics, ecology, evolution, plant science and human health and physiology.
  • Develops in students the ability to complete investigative science through the requirement of sixty hours of lab work.

 


IB Chemistry SL – 80382S1 and 80382S2


This course fulfills the Group 4 or Group 6 requirements for the IB Diploma Programme and is open to IB Course students on an availability basis. Submission of the Course Student Commitment Form to the IB office, room C120, is required at the beginning of the course.

Credit: 1.0
Grades:  11 or 12

Prerequisites: Successful completion of Honors Chemistry or Chemistry

Course description: 

  • This course is a one-year course at the Standard Level only. It may be offered on alternating years based upon enrolment numbers.
  • IB Chemistry emphasizes an investigative approach to science. Students will be expected to design and carry out experimental procedures, as well as apply theoretical principles and analyze results. 
  • Students explore the moral and ethical issues involved in local and global issues surrounding natural resources in order to foster a sense of social responsibility.
  • Introduces students to the theories and practical techniques involved in the composition, characterization, and transformation of substance.

IB Physics SL – 80453S1 and 80453S2

This course fulfills the Group 4 or Group 6 requirements for the IB Diploma Programme and is open to IB Course students on an availability basis. Submission of the Course Student Commitment Form to the IB office, room C120, is required at the beginning of the course.

Credit: 1.0
Grades:  11 or 12

Prerequisites: Successful Completion of Physics, or teacher recommendation; Concurrent enrollment in Alg II/Trig or higher

Course description:

  • This course is a one-year course at the Standard Level only. It may be offered on alternating years based upon enrolment numbers.
  • IB Physics emphasizes an investigative approach to science. Students will be expected to design and carry out experimental procedures, as well as apply theoretical principles and analyze results. 
  • Students also develop an awareness of moral and ethical issues, and examining local and global issues fosters a sense of social responsibility.
  • Introduces students to the laws of physics, the experimental skills required in physics, and the social and historical aspects of physics as an evolving body of human knowledge about nature.
  • Develops in students the ability to complete investigative science through the requirement of forty hours of lab work.

International Baccalaureate Group 5: Mathematics
IB Mathematical HL 60677S1 and 60677S2 

This course fulfills the Group 5 requirements for the IB Diploma Programme and is open to IB Course students on an availability basis. Submission of the Course Student Commitment Form to the IB office, room C120, is required at the beginning of the course.

Credit:  1.0
Grades: 12

Prerequisite: Successful completion of AP Calc BC or teacher recommendation
Expenses: TI 84 calculator recommended

Course description:

  • IB Mathematics HL is a study in algebra and coordinate geometry, quadratics, functions, index laws, higher level algebra, binomial expansions, sequences and series, trigonometry, formal proof, calculus, complex numbers, matrices and vectors, and analysis and approximation.

IB Mathematics SL – 60679S1 and 60679S2

 This course fulfills the Group 5 requirements for the IB Diploma Programme and is open to IB Course students on an availability basis. Submission of the Course Student Commitment Form to the IB office, room C120 is required at the beginning of the course.

Credit 1.0
Grades: 11 or 12

Prerequisites: Successful completion of Trig/Calc A
Expenses: TI 84 calculator recommended

Course description:

  • This course is a one-year course at the Standard Level only. 
  • IB Mathematics SL provides students who will continue to study mathematics in college with a background of mathematical thought and a reasonable level of technical ability.
  • Studies seven core topics: Algebra, Functions and Equations, Circular functions in trigonometry, Matrices, Vectors, Statistics and probability and Calculus. 
  • Develops the ability to apply mathematical concepts and principles to new situations.
  • Enables students to recognize and demonstrate an understanding of the practical applications of mathematics, appropriate use of technological as mathematical tools, and appropriate use of mathematical modeling. 
  • Enables students to formulate a mathematical argument and communicate it clearly. 
  • Encourages students to appreciate the multicultural and historical perspectives of mathematics.  

IB Mathematical Studies SL II - 60682S1 and 60682S2 

This course fulfills the Group 5 requirements for the IB Diploma Programme and is open to IB Course students on an availability basis. Submission of the Course Student Commitment Form to the IB office, room C120 is required at the beginning of the course.

Credit: 1.0
Grades: 11 or 12

Prerequisites: Successful completion of Alg II/Trig 
Expenses: TI 84 calculator recommended

Course description: 

  • This course is a one-year course sequence at the Standard Level only.  IB Math Studies caters to students with varied backgrounds and abilities.
  • Develops the ability to apply mathematical concepts and principles to new situations.
  • Enables students to recognize and demonstrate an understanding of the practical applications of mathematics, appropriate use of technological as mathematical tools, appropriate use of mathematical modeling.
  • Enables students to formulate a mathematical argument and communicate it clearly.
  • Encourages students to appreciate the multicultural and historical perspectives of mathematics.
  • Studies the following core topics: graphing display calculator, algebra, sets, logic and probability, functions, geometry and trigonometry, statistics, introduction to calculus and financial math.

International Baccalaureate: Group 6 Arts 


IB Art Design HL I - 11411S1 and 11411S2 (Jr. year)
IB Art Design HL I is the first year of a two- year sequence. Students selecting HL courses during the junior year are committed to completing the senior year of the two-year sequence.

IB Art Design HL II - 11415S1 and 11415S2 (Sr. year)
IB Art Design HL is a two-year sequence with IB exam submissions at the end of the second year. This course fulfills the Group 6 requirements for the IB Diploma Programme and is open to IB Course students on an availability basis. Submission of the Course Student Commitment Form to the IB office, room C120, is required at the beginning of the course.

Credit: 2.0
Grade:  11 and 12
Prerequisite:  Prior to HL I, recommended 1 semester Art History and 1 semester 2-Dimensional (2D) Art or 3-Dimensional (3D) Art
Expenses: $40 fee per semester/$80 per year 

Course description: 

  • This course is a two year course sequence at the Higher Level (HL).  IB Visual Art provides students with explorations in a variety of means and materials.  
  • Students will write reflections and research in the history of art and design.  
  • The HL course is for the visual art student, with creative and imaginative abilities, who may pursue the visual arts at the university or college level.
  • Provides students with the opportunities to make personal, socio-cultural and aesthetic experiences meaningful through the production and understanding of art.
  • Exemplifies and encourages an inquiring and integrated approach towards visual arts in their various historical and contemporary forms.
  • Promotes visual and contextual knowledge of art from various cultures.
  • Provides students with the common core elements in both HL and SL including an introduction to art concepts, art criticism and analysis, the acquisition of art studio techniques, media and skills, along with the relation of art to socio-cultural and historical contexts.

 


IB Film Standard Level (SL) and IB Film Higher Level (HL)

IB Film may be taken as a one-year SL Course with assessments submitted at the end of the year, or taken as a two-year sequence for IB Film HL with assessments submitted at the end of the second year. This course fulfills the Group 6 requirements for the IB Diploma Programme and is open to IB Course students on an availability basis. Submission of the Course Student Commitment Form to the IB office, room C120, is required at the beginning of the course.

 IB Film SL - 70749S1 and 70749S2

Credit: 1.0
Grades:  11 or 12

Prerequisite: One of the following courses is highly recommended - Multimedia I, Multimedia II or Photography 

IB Film HL- 70750S1 and 70750S2

This is the second year in a two-year sequence, following IB Film SL.

Credit: 1.0
Grades:  12

Prerequisite: Successful completion of IB Film SL and teacher recommendation.

Course Descriptions          

  • The Diploma Programme film course explores film history, theory and socio-culture background through the study and analysis of film texts and exercises in film-making.
  • The course develops students’ critical abilities, enabling them to appreciate the multiplicity of cultural and historical perspectives in film.
  • To achieve an international understanding within the world of film, students are taught to consider film texts, theories and ideas from the points of view of different individuals, nations and cultures.
  • The Diploma Programme film course aims to develop students’ skills so that they become adept in both interpreting and making film texts. All IB Film assessments are project based.
  • Students in HL are expected to complete extensions of the core units adding depth and breadth the second year of study.

IB Business Management Standard Level (SL) and Higher Level (HL)

 IB Business Management may be taken as a one-year SL Course with exams in May or taken as a two-year sequence for IB Business Management HL with exams at the end of the second year. This course fulfills the Group 6 requirements for the IB Diploma Programme and is open to IB Course students on an availability basis. Submission of the Course Student Commitment Form to the IB office, room C120, is required at the beginning of the course.

 IB Business Management SL - 25720S1 and 25720S2

Credit: 1.0
Grades:  11 or 12

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Marketing I
Expense:  DECA membership fee of $40 - students enrolled in IB Business are required to be members of DECA.

IB Business Management HL - 25721S1 and 25721S2

Credit: 1.0
Grades:  12

Prerequisite: Successful completion of IB Business Management SL and teacher recommendation.
Expense:  DECA membership fee of $40 - students enrolled in IB Business are required to be members of DECA.

Course description:

  •  The Business Management Course is designed to develop students' knowledge and understanding of business management theories, as well as their ability to apply a range of tools and techniques.
  • Students learn to analyze, discuss and evaluate business activities at local, national and international levels.
  • The course covers a range of organizations from all sectors, as well as the sociocultural and economic contexts in which those organizations operate.
  • Students in HL are expected to complete extensions of the core units adding depth and breadth the second year of study.

IB Theory of Knowledge (TOK I) – 85885 Junior  
Credit: 0.5 per semester
Grades:  11-12

Fulfills the requirements for the IB Diploma Programme.

Open to non-IB diploma students. Availability based upon diploma student enrollment.​

​ Submission of the Course Student Commitment Form to the IB office, room C120 is required at time of registration. 
This course is only available Spring semester.


IB Theory of Knowledge (TOK II) -  85884 Senior

Credit: 0.5 per semester
Grades:  12

Fulfills the requirements for the IB Diploma Programme.

Open to full IBDP Seniors only. 

Prerequisite:  TOK II is the second semester of a two semester sequence.  Students must have successfully completed TOK I.

Course description: 

  • This course is unique to the IBDP and is an interdisciplinary requirement intended to stimulate critical reflection on the knowledge and experience gained inside and outside the classroom.  
  • This course challenges students to explore the basis of knowledge, the way we know what we know, to examine questions of bias and to develop the ability to analyze evidence expressed in argument. 
  • This course spans the second semester of Junior year and first semester of Senior year.
Algebra I - 60400S1 and 60400S2

Credit:  1.0
Grade:  9-12
Prerequisite:  Successful completion of Math 8 or teacher recommendation
Expenses:  It is highly recommended students purchase a Graphing calculator (TI-84).

This is an Algebra course covering topics that include the manipulation of algebraic equations, application of linear, quadratic and variation functions, the representation of data, and the utilization of ratios, proportions, measurements, similarity and probability in the context of real world problems.


Geometry - 60475S1 and 60475S2

Credit:  1.0
Grade: 10-12
Prerequisite:  Successful completion of Algebra I 
Expenses:  It is highly recommended students purchase a Graphing calculator (TI-84), compass, protractor and ruler. 

This is a geometry course integrating the topics of coordinate geometry, measure and capacity, similarity and congruency, inductive and deductive reasoning, the applications of linear, quadratic and rational functions and probability and data simulation in the context of real world problems.


Geometry Honors - 60450S1 and 60450S2  

Credit:  1.0
Grade:  9-10
Prerequisite:  Recommended “B” or better in Algebra I and teacher recommendation

Expenses:  It is highly recommended students purchase a Graphing calculator (TI-84), compass, protractor and ruler.

This is an accelerated geometry course for students who want a challenging, fast-paced course.  In addition to the topics in Geometry, Honors Geometry emphasizes the proof of geometric and algebraic properties and emphasizes real world applications to geometric concepts.  A pretest for honors level ability and aptitude may be required.

Students who are planning to take Advanced Placement or International Baccalaureate classes during high school are encouraged to enroll in honors courses.  Honors courses are specifically designed to develop reading, writing, and critical thinking skills that support success in higher level courses and post-secondary success.


Applied Geometry - 60525

Credit:  0.5 
Grade:  11-12
Prerequisite:  Successful completion of Algebra I and teacher recommendation

Expense:  
Graphing calculator (TI-83 or TI-83+) highly recommended, a ruler, a compass, and a protractor

The focus of this course is geometric foundations, measurement and applications.  Students taking this course will use a variety of tools and techniques to communicate the reasoning involved in solving problems.


Topics/Algebra/Geometry/Trig - 60340S2

Credit 0.5
Grades 11-12
Prerequisite:  Successful completion of Applied Geometry and teacher recommendation
Expenses:  Graphing calculator (TI-83 or TI-83+) highly recommended, a ruler, a compass, and a protractor

This course is an extension of algebra and applied geometry, and will include basic concepts of trigonometry.  Students will also develop test-taking strategies.


Algebra II/Trig - 60590S1 and 60590S2


Credit:  1.0
Grades:  11-12
Prerequisite:  “D” or better in Geometry 
Expenses:  It is highly recommended students purchase a Graphing calculator (TI-84).

This algebra course covers the advanced topics of the application of linear, quadratic, exponential, logarithmic and periodic functions, logical reasoning and proof, sequences and series, advanced probability and data analysis and introductory trigonometry in the context of real world problems.


Honors Algebra II/Trig – 60550S1 and 60550S2  


Credit:  1.0
Grades:   9-11
Prerequisites: Recommended grade of “A” in Algebra I and Geometry or grade of “B” or better in Geometry Honors and/or teacher recommendation.
Expenses:  It is highly recommended students purchase a Graphing calculator (TI-84).

This is a rigorous course for highly motivated students.  Applications are handled by creating mathematical models of phenomena in the real world.  It is a comprehensive study of functions, including linear functions, quadratic functions, exponential functions, logarithmic functions, rational and irrational algebraic functions, and higher-degree functions.  It also includes sequences, series, probability and basic to intermediate trigonometric and circular functions.

Students who are planning to take Advanced Placement or International Baccalaureate classes during high school are encouraged to enroll in honors courses.  Honors courses are specifically designed to develop reading, writing, and critical thinking skills that support success in higher level courses and post-secondary success.


Calculus III -  60660



Credit: 0.5
Grades: 9-12
Prerequisite: Calculus BC
 

This semester-long course represents the continuation of the calculus sequence. It is a systematic approach to the understanding of multivariable calculus. Topics include: vectors and vector valued functions, functions ofseveral variables, multiple integrals, and vector analysis.

Differential Equations
 60661


Credit: 0.5
Grades: 9-12
Prerequisite: Calculus BC


This semester-long course represents the continuation of the calculus sequence.  It is a systematic approach to the understanding of multi-variable calculus.  Topics include:  vectors and vector valued functions, functions of several variables, multiple integrals, and vector analysis.

College Algebra - 60570S1 and 60570S2

Credit:  1.0
Grades:  11-12
Prerequisite: Algebra II/Trig; 
Expenses:  It is highly recommended students purchase a Graphing calculator (TI-84).

In this course students study algebraic functions (linear, quadratic, cubic, exponential, logarithmic and absolute values) and their graphs.


ACC College Algebra (MAT 121) – 69030

Credit: 1.0 credit / ACC 4 credit hours.  This course receives both high school and college credit.
Grades:  11-12
Prerequisite: Successful completion of high school Algebra II class and Accuplacer score of 85-120 in Math or ACT Math score of 23 or SAT Math score of 460 required
Expenses:  Purchase of a mymathlab account (approximately $100), graphing calculator (TI-84) and ACC registration fee. The registration fee may be covered by a stipend provided by the state of Colorado through the Colorado Opportunity Fund provided eligible students complete the necessary paperwork. 

This course includes a brief review of intermediate algebra, equations, and inequalities, functions and the graphs, exponential and logarithmic functions, linear and non-linear systems, selection of topics from among graphing of the conic sections, introduction to sequences and series permutations and combinations, the binomial theorem and theory of equations.


ACC College Trigonometry (MAT 122) - 69032

Credit: 0.5 credit / ACC 3 credit hours.  This course receives both high school and college credit.
Grades:  11-12
Prerequisite: Successful completion of ACC-MAT 121 (College Algebra) or ACT Math score of 24 required.
Expenses:  Purchase of a mymathlab account (approximately $100), graphing calculator (TI-84) and ACC registration fee. The registration fee may be covered by a stipend provided by the state of Colorado through the Colorado Opportunity Fund provided eligible students complete the necessary paperwork. 

This course covers topics including trigonometric functions (with graphs and inverse functions), identities and equations, solutions of triangles, complex numbers, and other topics as time permits.  This is a traditional prerequisite course to the calculus sequence.  Student must have successful completion of this course with a “C” or better to receive college credit. 


Trigonometry/Calculus A 60600 and 60674 


Credit: 1.0 Credit year long class
Grades:  10-12
Prerequisite:  Recommend an "A" in Algebra II/Trig or "C" or higher in Honors 
Algebra II/Trig 
Expenses: It is highly recommended that students purchase a Graphing calculator (TI-84).

This course will cover trigonometric and circular functions, as well as right triangle trigonometry, laws of sine and cosine, and their applications.


Probability & Statistics - 60775


Credit: 0.5
Grade:  10-12
Prerequisite: Algebra I and/or teacher recommendation.
Expenses:  It is highly recommended that students purchase a Graphing calculator (TI-84)

Students will study topics in probability and statistics including experimental design and presentation and interpretation of data.  This course will be excellent preparation for a college statistics course.


Discrete Mathematics - 60800

Credit: 0.5
Grades:  11-12
Prerequisite: Algebra I and/or teacher recommendation
Expenses: It is highly recommended that students purchase a Graphing calculator (TI-84).

Discrete mathematics is the study of mathematical concepts that are non-continuous.  The material studied in discrete mathematics, such as integers, patterns, and statements in logic, have distinct, separated values.  Topics of study in this course include: sequences and series, Pascal’s Triangle, the Binomial Theorem, permutations and combinations, probability, game theory, matrices, cryptography, set theory, and election theory.


Advanced Placement Statistics - 60801S1 
and 60801S2


Credit: 1.0
Grade:  11-12
Prerequisite: "B" or better in Alg II/Trig or "A" in College Algebra

Expenses:  Students are required to purchase an AP textbook (approximately $100) and a graphing calculator (TI84).
AP Exam:  Students enrolled in the course are expected to take the National AP Exam in May (approximately $93).

AP Statistics is a college level class that provides students the opportunity to earn college credit by passing the AP Statistics Exam.  Topics presented include: exploratory analysis of data making use of graphical and numerical techniques to study patterns and departures from patterns, collecting data according to a well-developed plan, applying probability as a tool to anticipate what the distribution of data should look like under a given model, and using statistical inference to guide the selection of appropriate models.

Advanced Placement courses allow students to take the challenge of college-level courses while in the familiar surroundings of their high school.  AP courses develop advanced reading, writing, and thinking skills that benefit students in their post-secondary pursuits.  These courses require work outside the classroom, during summer and breaks.  Students should consider their academic, social, work, and extra-curricular activities before undertaking the commitment of an Advanced Placement course.  Students will not be allowed to drop an AP course after they have signed up and courses are scheduled. This is a one-year course; students may not drop at semester.   


A
dvanced Placement Calculus AB - 60625S1 and 60625S2


  

Credit:  1.0
Grades:  11-12
Prerequisite: “C” or better in Trigonometry
AP Exam:  Students enrolled in the course are expected to take the National AP Exam in May (approximately $93).

AP Calculus AB is a college level class that provides students with an academic experience equivalent to first semester college calculus.  Students may earn college credit by passing the AP Calculus AB exam, which is administered annually.

AP Calculus AB emphasizes the theory of elementary functions, differential and integral calculus of functions of the variable.  Topics include various types of functions, limits, continuity, the derivative and its applications and the integral and its applications. 

Advanced Placement courses allow students to take the challenge of college-level courses while in the familiar surroundings of their high school.  AP courses develop advanced reading, writing, and thinking skills that benefit students in their post-secondary pursuits.  These courses require work outside the classroom, during summer and breaks.  Students should consider their academic, social, work, and extra-curricular activities before undertaking the commitment of an Advanced Placement course.  Students will not be allowed to drop an AP course after they have signed up and courses are scheduled. This is a one-year course; students may not drop at semester.   


A
dvanced Placement Calculus BC - 60650S1 and 60650S2



Credit:  1.0
Grades:  11-12
Prerequisite: “A” in Trig/Calc A or successful completion of AP Calculus AB
Expenses:  It is highly recommended students purchase an AP textbook (approximately. $100) and a graphing calculator (TI84 or TI89).
AP Exam:  Students enrolled in the course are expected to take the National AP Exam in May (approximately $93).

AP Calculus BC is a college level class that provides students with an academic experience equivalent to second semester college calculus.  Students may earn college credit by passing the AP Calculus BC exam, which is administered annually.  AP Calculus BC reviews topics presented in AP Calculus AB.  It continues on with extended applications of derivatives and integrals, derivatives of parametric, polar, and vector functions, polynomial approximations and series, and study of the Taylor series

 Advanced Placement courses allow students to take the challenge of college-level courses while in the familiar surroundings of their high school.  AP courses develop advanced reading, writing, and thinking skills that benefit students in their post-secondary pursuits.  These courses require work outside the classroom, during summer and breaks.  Students should consider their academic, social, work, and extra-curricular activities before undertaking the commitment of an Advanced Placement course.  Students will not be allowed to drop an AP course after they have signed up and courses are scheduled. This is a one-year course; students may not drop at semester.   


International Baccalaureate Group 5: Mathematics






IB Mathematical HL 60677S1 and 60677S2 

This course fulfills the Group 5 requirements for the IB Diploma Programme and is open to IB Course students on an availability basis. Submission of the Course Student Commitment Form to the IB office, room C120, is required at the beginning of the course.

Credit:  1.0
Grades: 12

Prerequisite: Successful completion of AP Calc BC or teacher recommendation
Expenses: TI 84 calculator recommended

Course description:

  • IB Mathematics HL is a study in algebra and coordinate geometry, quadratics, functions, index laws, higher level algebra, binomial expansions, sequences and series, trigonometry, formal proof, calculus, complex numbers, matrices and vectors, and analysis and approximation.





IB Mathematics SL II– 60679S1 and 60679S2

 This course fulfills the Group 5 requirements for the IB Diploma Programme and is open to IB Course students on an availability basis. Submission of the Course Student Commitment Form to the IB office, room C120 is required at the beginning of the course.

Credit 1.0
Grades: 11 or 12

Prerequisites: Successful completion of Trig/Calc A
Expenses: TI 84 calculator recommended

Course description:

  • This course is a one-year course at the Standard Level only. 
  • IB Mathematics SL provides students who will continue to study mathematics in college with a background of mathematical thought and a reasonable level of technical ability.
  • Studies seven core topics: Algebra, Functions and Equations, Circular functions in trigonometry, Matrices, Vectors, Statistics and probability and Calculus. 
  • Develops the ability to apply mathematical concepts and principles to new situations.
  • Enables students to recognize and demonstrate an understanding of the practical applications of mathematics, appropriate use of technological as mathematical tools, and appropriate use of mathematical modeling. 
  • Enables students to formulate a mathematical argument and communicate it clearly. 
  • Encourages students to appreciate the multicultural and historical perspectives of mathematics.  






IB Mathematical Studies SL II- 60682S1 and 60682S2 

This course fulfills the Group 5 requirements for the IB Diploma Programme and is open to IB Course students on an availability basis. Submission of the Course Student Commitment Form to the IB office, room C120 is required at the beginning of the course.

Credit: 1.0
Grades: 11 or 12

Prerequisites: Successful completion of Alg II/Trig 
Expenses: TI 84 calculator recommended

Course description: 

  • This course is a one-year course sequence at the Standard Level only.  IB Math Studies caters to students with varied backgrounds and abilities.
  • Develops the ability to apply mathematical concepts and principles to new situations.
  • Enables students to recognize and demonstrate an understanding of the practical applications of mathematics, appropriate use of technological as mathematical tools, appropriate use of mathematical modeling.
  • Enables students to formulate a mathematical argument and communicate it clearly.
  • Encourages students to appreciate the multicultural and historical perspectives of mathematics.
  • Studies the following core topics: graphing display calculator, algebra, sets, logic and probability, functions, geometry and trigonometry, statistics, introduction to calculus and financial math.
Instrumental Music Courses

The philosophy of the ThunderRidge High School Music Department is to foster personal, intellectual, and affective growth through quality musical performance resulting in activities promoting leadership, high quality, community, and collective effort.  We also want to have fun!

Daily attendance for rehearsals is imperative as you are contributing to a group effort and the group suffers when you are not there.  In addition, consistent daily practice is required to maintain and improve skills needed to positively contribute to the group.


Symphonic Band - 70325S1 and 70325S2

Credit: 1.0 Fine Art Credit
Grades:  9-12
Expenses:  Instrument rental (optional), percussion fee ($100)

This ensemble is designed to develop musical skills through traditional band literature for higher-level instrumentalists.  Emphasis will be on continued technical and musical development on an instrument through a variety of quality band literature. Percussionists are required to pay a $100.00 usage fee for school-owned percussion equipment.  Some wind instruments are available to rent from the school.  Out-of-school performances will be required, and are part of the course grade. 


Guitar - 70487 (Beginning Guitar)

Credit: 0.5 Fine Art Credit
Grades:  9-12
Prerequisite:  None
Expenses: A guitar book costing approximately $7.00
Materials needed:  Your own acoustic (non-electric) guitar

This course is an introduction to beginning guitar with focus on basic guitar skills including reading music, chords, and tablature.  The course will also introduce various guitar styles such as folk, classical, blues, and rock.  Students must provide their own acoustic guitar.  Electric guitar is not taught, and electric guitars will not be used in this class.


Guitar II – 70488

Credit: 0.5 Fine Art Credit
Grades:  10-12
Prerequisite: Approval from Instructor and possible audition required demonstrating ability to read music.
Expenses:  A guitar book costing approx. $7.00

This course expands on our beginning guitar class.  Emphasis is placed on music theory as it relates to the guitar, advanced chords, and will expand on various guitar styles, i.e. classical, rock, blues, etc.  Electric guitar is not taught, and electric guitars will not be used in this class.  Student must provide his or her own acoustic folk or classical guitar. 


Piano I -  70485 

Credit: 0.5 Fine Art Credit
Grades:  9 - 12
Prerequisite:  None
Expenses:  None

This course is designed for the student with little or no piano keyboard experience. Basic musical skills like reading music, proper keyboard fingering, notes, and chords will be taught.  The course will also introduce various musical styles, like classical, jazz, rock, and blues.


Marching Band – Activity


Grades:   9 - 12

Prerequisite:   Students must participate in summer camps prior to the school year.  This activity is open to all students.  To register for the activity, go to the ThunderRidge Band website.

Requirement:  Students participating in this activity must also be enrolled in a ThunderRidge Performing Arts Class. Options include band, orchestra, choir or theatre. 

Expenses: $100 district marching band participation fee. $200 TRHS marching band fee. 

 

Students will continue to learn and enhance music fundamentals and technique learned during previous instructions.  Students will also explore multiple approaches to develop and refine aspects of music performance and general effect as it pertains to the Marching Band show design. Rehearsals will be after school two days a week and include several Saturday camps and Competitions. 


Wind Ensemble – 70300S1 and 70300S2


Credit: 1.0 Fine Art Credit 

Grades:   9 - 12

Prerequisite:   By audition only - must participate in Marching Band

Requirement:  Students enrolled in this course must also be enrolled in first semester band class.  Options include Marching Band and Percussion Tech.

Expenses:  Instrument rental is $50.00 per semester.   Required concert attire purchased by each student.

 

This second semester course is designed for advanced wind students.  Students will continue with the development of quality individual and ensemble performance skills.  The highest quality traditional and contemporary literature for wind band will be explored through intense instruction.  This course may be repeated for credit.


String Orchestra - 70465S1 and 70465S2

Credit:  1.0 Fine Art Credit
Grades:  9-12

Prerequisite: None
Expenses:  Instrument rental (optional).  Formal black dress is required: full length dress for women and black coat, black pants, white shirt and bow tie for men.

This ensemble is designed to develop musical skills through traditional orchestral instruments.  Emphasis will be on continued technical and musical development on an instrument through a variety of literature.  Some string instruments are available to rent from the school.  Out-of-school performances will be required.  Daily practice is required. 


Chamber Orchestra - 70461S1 and 70461S2

Credit:  1.0 Fine Art Credit
Grades:  10-12
Prerequisite:  Audition and/or director approval required.
Expenses:  Instrument rental - $100 per year (optional)
Performance outfit – Members of this ensemble will be required to purchase a performance outfit (full-length black for ladies and tuxedos for men).

This ensemble is the most advanced string ensemble in the TRHS Orchestra program.  Emphasis will be on advanced ensemble techniques and advanced individual musicianship through performance of high quality literature.  Private lessons are highly recommended for members of this ensemble.  Daily attendance is imperative for this ensemble as the entire ensemble relies on your part being there.  Excessive absences may result in removal from the group.  Some string instruments are available to rent from the school.  Out-of-school performances will be required and is part of the course grade. 


Percussion Tech - 70400S1 and 70400S2

Credit: 1.0 Fine Art Credit
Grade: 9-12
Prerequisite: At least two years playing experience and director approval
Expenses: Equipment usage fee of $100.00 per year

This class is designed to teach percussionists a full range of percussion techniques from simple snare drum to mallet keyboard studies.  The class will focus on specific techniques in playing all percussion instruments, perform a variety of percussion ensemble literature, and work on band literature.  Performance opportunities include 3-4 scheduled percussion ensemble concert performances and performances with the ThunderRidge Bands.  All percussionists wishing to continue their skill development should sign up for this class.  Percussionists are required to pay a $100.00 usage fee for school-owned percussion equipment.


Jazz Ensembles


Our Jazz Ensembles are supplemental to the Concert Band, Wind Ensemble, and Symphonic Band.  Any student wishing to be in an ensemble must also take another band class (with these exceptions: piano, guitar, and bass).  Emphasis will be on developing Jazz skills through traditional jazz literature and improvisation.  Outside-of-school performances will be required. 


Jazz Ensemble I - 70375S1 and 70375S2

Credit:  1.0 Fine Art Credit
Grades:  9-12
Prerequisite:  Audition and/or director approval required.
Expenses:  Instrument rental (optional) and Jazz combo book(s)

This is the most advanced jazz ensemble at TRHS.  This ensemble contains a traditional jazz instrumentation (5 saxes, 5 trombones, 5 trumpets, piano, guitar, bass, and drums).  Emphasis is on performance of high quality and difficult literature.  Members of this ensemble must also register for one of the following bands: Percussion Tech, Wind Ensemble, or Symphonic Band.  Exceptions are made for piano, guitar, and bass players or at the director’s discretion.  You must be able to read music for your instrument to participate in this group.


Vocal Music Courses


Music Theory - 70660

Credit: 0.5 Fine Art Credit
Grades:  11-12
Prerequisite:  Music teacher’s signature
Expenses:  It is highly recommended that student purchase a music theory workbook.

This course focuses on theoretical aspects of music including:  ear training, scales, rhythm, and harmonic notation.  This class is suited for those students with some musical background and serves as a good introduction to college level music theory.  If a student is considering a major or minor in music, in college, this is an excellent course.


Concert Choir - 70500S1 and 70500S2

Credit:  1.0 Fine Art Credit
Grades:  9-12

Prerequisite:  No auditions required

This choir is open to all who wish to perform concerts, but who are not interested in the expense and commitment of the select choirs.  Music of all styles will be performed.  Rehearsals and performance schedules require some extracurricular commitment.


Men’s Select Choir - 70565S1 and 70565S2

Credit:  1.0 Fine Art Credit
Grades:  9-12
Prerequisite:  The willingness to sing and have fun.

This men's choir, which accepts all male singers of any age with an enthusiasm for singing, will perform at school and for community groups.  Music of all styles will be performed.  Rehearsals and performance schedules require some extracurricular commitment.


Select Treble Choir - 70550S1 and 70550S2

Credit:  1.0 Fine Art Credit
Grades:  9-12
Prerequisite:  Audition required.
Expenses:  A special outfit is purchased by each student.  Student is responsible for the cost of field trips.

Select Treble Choir is composed of intermediate choir students selected through extensive auditions based upon technical and aesthetic qualities.  This varsity choir performs classical, jazz, and show music at various concerts.  Rehearsals and performance schedules require extracurricular commitment.


Select Mixed Choir - 70630S1 and 70630S2

Credit: 1.0 Fine Art Credit
Grades:  10-12
Prerequisite:  Audition required.
Expenses:  A special outfit is purchased by each student.  
Student is responsible for the cost of field trips.

Select Mixed Choir is composed of advanced choir students selected through extensive auditions based upon technical and aesthetic qualities.  This varsity choir performs classical, jazz, and show music at various concerts, festivals, contests, and community group events throughout the state.  Rehearsals and performance schedules require extracurricular commitment.


Select Women’s Choir - 70635S1 and 70635S2

Credit:  1.0 Fine Art Credit
Grades:  10-12
Prerequisite:  Audition required.
Expenses:  A special outfit is purchased by each student. 
Student is responsible for the cost of field trips.

Select Women’s Choir is composed of advanced choir students selected through extensive auditions based upon technical and aesthetic qualities.  This varsity choir performs classical, jazz and show music at various concerts, festivals, contests, and community group events throughout the state.  Rehearsals and performance schedules require extracurricular commitment.


Music Appreciation - 70650

Credit: 0.5 Fine Art Credit

Grades:  9-12

This class is open to any student wishing to explore the art of music. Through listening and discussion we will compare and analyze the many styles of modern music (rock, jazz, R&B, country, pop, hip-hop, folk, rap) as well as music throughout history.

Digital Audio Production - 70685

Credit: 0.5 Fine Art Credit
Grades: 9 - 12

Prerequisite: None
Expense:  Course fee of $20 
(all fees subject to change per BOE approval)

Students will develop essential skills needed to: operate audio equipment; plan, setup and execute production sessions; collaborate in the creation of production material and music; complete projects on both an individual and team-oriented basis. Production will include the use of professional audio equipment,  "Logic" audio production software (recording, editing, mixing, mastering), audio production strategies, and basic music theory.

Physical Education - 75550 (one semester) 

Physical Education - 75550 XX (additional semester)  

Credit:  0.5
Grades:  9-12
Prerequisite:  None

This course is designed to improve student physical fitness through a variety of team and individual sport activities.  Emphasis will be placed on improving student physical fitness levels, skill and strategy building. Physical assessments and written assessments will also be included. This course may be taken more than once for credit. Passing this course will enable students to meet the required Physical Education Standards.


Advanced Team Sports I – 75480 (one semester) 

Advanced Team Sports I - 75480 XX (additional semester)

Credit: 0.5
Grades: 11-12
Prerequisite: Teacher signature and an “A” or “B” in Physical Education or Strength and Conditioning

This course is designed for higher competitive interactions in a variety of team and individual sport activities.  Emphasis will be placed on improving student physical fitness, advanced skills, advanced team strategies and a higher level of competition.  Physical assessments and written assessments will also be included.  This course may be taken more than once for credit.  Passing this course will enable students to meet the required Physical Education Standards.


Adaptive Physical Education - 75475

Credit:  0.5
Grades:  9-12
Prerequisite:  Teacher signature required

This course is designed for any student having any kind of mental or physical disability, which is temporary or permanent, or those students who have motor control problems, which prohibits them from participating successfully in the activities of other Physical Education classes.  Individual and group activities and exercises will be selected based according to the limitations or needs of each student.  Any student interested in working with students with special needs can have the opportunity to become peer helpers in this class with teacher approval.  This course may be taken more than once for credit.  Passing this course will enable students to meet the required Physical Education Standards.


Healthy Decisions for Teens - 55300

Credit:  0.5
Grades:  9-12
Prerequisite:  None

Note:  This course may be used for 0 .5 PE requirement, 0 .5 Practical Arts requirement or 0 .5 Elective requirement.

This health course explores everyday living aspects of consumerism; individual, family and community health; relationship issues; personal safety; nutrition and diet; prevention and control of disease; substance use and abuse; and human growth, development and sexuality. The basis of each of these topics centers around developing decision-making skills while building resiliency.  Students will learn how to make safe and healthy choices as a teen, which will produce a more healthy life as an adult.  Passing this course will enable students to meet the required Health Standards.  This class may only be taken once.


Shape Up – 75322 – One Semester 

Shape Up - 75323 – Additional Semester 

Credit:  0.5
Grades:  9-1
Prerequisite:  None

Expense:  Course fee of $20 per semester (all fees subject to change per BOE approval)

This course is designed to improve student physical fitness.  Students will learn to understand and apply basic fitness concepts.  Cardiovascular fitness, flexibility, circuit training and cross-training principals will be emphasized.  Activities such as jogging, yoga, step aerobics and Tae-bo will be included.  Physical assessments and written assessments will also be included.  This course may be taken more than once for credit.  Passing this course will enable students to meet the required Physical Education Standards.


Strength and Conditioning I – 75350 - Fall Semester

Strength and Conditioning I - 
75351 - Spring Semester 

Credit:  0.5
Grades:  9-12
Prerequisite:   None

Expense:  Course fee of $20 per semester  (all fees subject to change per BOE approval)

Strength and Conditioning I is designed for those students who want to develop overall body strength and muscular endurance.  The program is designed to strengthen the major muscles of the human body, through lifts such as, bench press, squats, incline bench, and hang cleans (and variations thereof).  The students will also be involved in a variety of plyometrics, speed ladders, medicine ball training, and other activities to help increase speed and endurance.  This program works well for any student who wants to build and maintain their strength.  This is a class for first time lifters and those students involved in lower level athletics.  *Physical assessments and written assessments will also be included. Passing this course will enable students to meet the required Physical Education Standards. This course may be taken more than once for credit.


Strength and Conditioning II - 75355 - Fall Semester 

Strength and Conditioning II -  
75356 - Spring Semester 

Credit:  0.5
Grades:  10-12
Prerequisite:  A student must have taken Strength and Conditioning I, passing the class with  an “A” or “B”.

Expense:  Course fee of $20 per semester (all fees subject to change per BOE approval)

This class provides an opportunity for advanced athletes (that play a sport) at ThunderRidge to improve their level of power.  Power Training combines both strength and speed in an attempt to develop explosiveness, agility, coordination, and enhance reaction time.  Students will learn the importance of weight training and how it will apply to their specific sport.  This class is designed for the serious lifter who is willing to meet the demanding challenges that will be required of them in and out of class.  *Physical assessments and written assessments will also be included.  Passing this course will enable students to meet the required Physical Education Standards.  This course may be taken more than once for credit.  Student athletes should be taking this class every semester.


Athletic Training I - 75330

Credit:  0.5
Grades:  9-12
Prerequisite:  None
Expense:  Course Fee of $30 for supplies per semester  
(all fees subject to change per BOE approval)

CPR and First Aid certificates through the American Red Cross (Optional)

This class will provide ThunderRidge students certification in community first aid and safety through the American Red Cross and will introduce anatomy and terminology as it relates to the Sports Medicine profession. This class will build a foundation of knowledge needed for those students who are wishing to take the Sports Medicine II class.  Students wishing to take this class twice must obtain instructor approval.  Passing this course will enable students to meet the required Physical Education Standards.


 Athletic Training II - 75340

Credit: 0.5
Grades: 10-12
Prerequisite: Completion of Athletic Training I course with a grade of “B” or higher 
Expense:  Course fee of $30 for supplies per semester. Class fee will cover the purchase of supplies used for lab activities, i.e. tape, pre-wrap, bandages, etc. 
(all fees subject to change per BOE approval)

TRHS students who enroll in this class should have a strong interest in Sports Medicine or other related medical fields.  This class will build upon the knowledge base established in Sports Medicine I.  Students will learn in more detail the mechanism of injuries, anatomical structures damaged during an injury as well as prevention and treatment of athletic injuries.  This class will combine both lecture and practical application of skills taught.  A strong background and/or knowledge in anatomy and physiology are suggested.  Passing this course will enable students to meet the required Physical Education Standards.


Adventure Experience I - 75575 

Credit:  0.5
Grades:  9-12

Prerequisite:  None
Expense:  Course fee of $20 per semester 
(all fees subject to change per BOE approval)

Students will learn cooperative living skills, teamwork, problem solving and leadership skills through the use of individual and group challenges, games, and the use of the Low Elements of an indoor climbing wall.  This course may be taken more than once for credit but only one time per year.  Passing this course will enable students to meet the required Physical Education Standards.


Adventure Experience II -  75585

Credit:  0.5
Grades:  9-12

Prerequisite:  Completion of Adventure Experience I course with a grade of “C” or higher 
Expense:  Course fee of $20 per semester 
(all fees subject to change per BOE approval)

Students will learn cooperative living skills, teamwork, problem solving and leadership skills through the use of individual and group challenges, games, and the use of the High Elements of an indoor climbing wall.  This course may be taken more than once for credit but only one time per year.  Passing this course will enable students to meet the required Physical Education Standards.

Earth/Environmental Science - 80325S1 and 80325S2

Credit: 1.0
Grades:  9-12
Prerequisite: none
Expenses: None

Earth/Environmental Science is a High School level course in which students will master essential learning related to earth, atmosphere and oceans.   Important science ideas, such as cycles, systems, and energy flow will be applied to the study of topics including geology, weather, astronomy and natural resources.  The relationship between these earth systems and living systems will be explored so that students will be able to make informed decisions regarding the use and care of the natural resources the earth provides.


Biology - 80350S1 and 80350S2

Credit:  1.0
Grade:  10 – 12
Prerequisite:  none
Expenses: 
 $4 dissection fee and a $6 goggle recovery fee;  It is highly recommended students purchase colored pencils, metric ruler and a TI-83, TI-83 Plus or TI-84 calculator.

Biology is the study of living organisms.  This course will cover these main topics:  (1) Scientific methodology, (2) cell molecular structure, biology and function, (3) diversity and taxonomy, (4) energy transformations, (5) homeostasis, (6) genetics and (7) evolution, (8) ecology, and (9) environmental and ethical issues relating to Biology.  The course will be laboratory-based and requires extensive work in writing and data analysis.


Biology Honors - 80356S1 and 80356S2

Credit:  1.0
Grade:  9-10
Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in Algebra I (recommended for strong Math and Science students)
Expenses:  $4 dissection fee and a $6 goggle recovery fee; It is highly recommended students purchase colored pencils, metric ruler and a TI-83, TI-83 Plus or TI-84 calculator.

Biology is the study of living organisms.  This course will to cover these main topics:  (1) Scientific methodology, (2) cell molecular structure, biology and function, (3) diversity and taxonomy, (4) energy transformations, (5) homeostasis, (6) genetics and (7) evolution, (8) ecology, and (9) environmental and ethical issues relating to Biology.  The course will be laboratory-based and require extensive work in writing and data analysis.

Students who are planning to take Advanced Placement or International Baccalaureate classes during high school are encouraged to enroll in honors courses.  Honors courses are specifically designed to develop reading, writing, and critical thinking skills that support success in higher level courses and post-secondary success.


Applied Biology - 80360S1 and 80360S2

Credit:  1.0
Grades:  10-12
Prerequisite:  Teacher recommendation 
Expenses: 
$4 dissection fee and a $6 goggle recovery fee 

Biology is the study of living organisms.  This course will cover those main topics described in Biology 80350 but in less depth.  Emphasis will be placed on the scientific method throughout the course.  The course will be laboratory-based. The materials and activities of this course are less abstract and more concrete. They are adapted for students who have not been successful in traditional science classes.

*CCHE credit may be applied dependent upon where this course is taken in sequence with other science classes.   See your counselor for more information.


Advanced Placement Biology - 80365S1 and 80365S2


Credit:  1.0
Grades:  11-12
Prerequisites:  “C” or better in Biology and Chemistry or concurrently taking Chemistry
Expenses:  In addition to the $6 google fee, there is a $4 dissection fee.  
It is highly recommended that students purchase an AP textbook ($100.00.)
AP Exam:  Students enrolled in the course are expected to take the National AP Exam in May (Approximately $93).

This course is the equivalent of a full-year, laboratory-based introductory Biology course for majors at the university level.  The curriculum is designed to prepare students for the National Advanced Placement exam held in May, which students may take to receive college credit.  Students electing to enroll in AP Biology should be highly motivated, desire a significant academic challenge, and be seriously interested in studying biological science at an advanced level. 

Major topics covered will include:  (1) Scientific Methodology, (2) Biological Molecules, (3) Chemistry of Life, (4) Cellular Organization, (5) Bioenergetics, (6) Heredity, (7) Molecular Biology, (8) Evolutionary Biology, (9) Diversity and Taxonomy, (10) Structure and Function of Plants, (11) Structure and Function of Animals, and (12) Ecology.  Approximately 40% of the course will be laboratory-based, and students will be expected to keep laboratory journals and produce college-level laboratory reports throughout the year.

Advanced Placement courses allow students to take the challenge of college-level courses while in the familiar surroundings of their high school.  AP courses develop advanced reading, writing, and thinking skills that benefit students in their post-secondary pursuits.  These courses require work outside the classroom, during summer and breaks.  Students should consider their academic, social, work, and extra-curricular activities before undertaking the commitment of an Advanced Placement course.  Students will not be allowed to drop an AP course after they have signed up and courses are scheduled. This is a one-year course; students may not drop at semester. 


Chemistry - 80375S1 and 80375S2

Credit:  1.0
Grade:  10-12
Prerequisites:  "C" or better in Biology and concurrent enrollment in Geometry
Expenses: There will be a $6 goggle recovery fee charged for this class. 
It is highly recommended students purchase a lab book, periodic table, ruler and a TI-83, TI-83 Plus or TI-84 calculator.

Chemistry covers the broad concepts upon which modern chemistry rests, including measurement, balancing chemical equations, states of matter, atomic theory, chemical bonding, arrangement of the periodic table, kinetics, equilibrium, acid and base reactions, electrochemistry, writing chemical names and formulas.  Laboratory work is an essential part of the course requiring extensive data analysis using their TI-83 calculators attached to scientific probes.


Chemistry Honors - 80385S1 and 80385S2

Credit: 1.0
Grade: 10 – 12
Prerequisites:  "B" or better in Biology and concurrent enrollment in Geometry
Expenses: 
There will be a $6 goggle recovery fee charged for this class.  
It is highly recommended students purchase a lab book, periodic table, ruler and a TI-83, TI-83 Plus or TI-84 calculator.

Chemistry covers the broad concepts upon which modern chemistry rests, including the mathematics of science, atomic structure, naming and writing formulas, chemical reactions, stoichiometry, gasses, periodicity, bonding, kinetics and equilibrium, solutions and concentrations, acids and bases, with possible enrichment in: redox, thermochemistry, nuclear chemistry, and organic chemistry/biochemistry. Laboratory work is an essential part of the course requiring extensive data analysis.  This course covers the above topics in more detail.

Students who are planning to take Advanced Placement or International Baccalaureate classes during high school are encouraged to enroll in honors courses.  Honors courses are specifically designed to develop reading, writing, and critical thinking skills that support success in higher level courses and post-secondary success.


Chemistry for the Community (ChemCom) - 80455S1 and 80455S2 

Credit:  1.0
Grade:  11-12
Prerequisite:  Must pass 1 semester of Biology or teacher recommendation if special situation occurs i.e. transfer students.
Expenses: There will be a $6 goggle recovery fee charged for this class.

Course integrates major concepts of chemistry with laboratory experiences and projects in relation to current environmental and public health issues such as acid rain, greenhouse gases, ozone depletion, water and soil pollution, individual and community health problems, nuclear energy, pollution, nutrition and other relevant issues.  This course focuses more on the application of chemistry in order to understand environmental issues than on the traditional study of chemical theory and structure offered in Chemistry 80375.  Students will learn about the many scientific, community health and medical careers, which today require a background in environmental chemistry.

*CCHE credit may be applied dependent upon where this course is taken in sequence with other science classes.   See your counselor for more information.


Advanced Placement Chemistry - 80400S1 and 80400S2


Credit: 1.0
Grades: 11-12
Prerequisite: “C” grade or better in both semesters of Chemistry and Algebra II, a passing grade in Biology
Expenses:  
There will be a $6 goggle recovery fee charged for this class.  It is highly recommended students purchase an AP textbook (approximately $100) and a periodic table ($0.50).
AP Exam:  Students enrolled in the course are expected to take the National AP Exam in May (Approximately $93).

This course is the equivalent of a full-year, laboratory-based introductory Chemistry course for majors at the university level.  The curriculum is designed to prepare students for the National Advanced Placement exam held in May, which students may take to receive college credit.  Students electing to enroll in AP Chemistry should be highly motivated, desire a significant academic challenge, and be seriously interested in studying physical and biological sciences at an advanced level. All traditional, general chemistry topics such as stoichiometry, gases bonding, kinetics, equilibrium acids and bases, thermochemistry, electrochemistry, organic chemistry and nuclear chemistry will be explored in greater depth and breadth than Chemistry.

Advanced Placement courses allow students to take the challenge of college-level courses while in the familiar surroundings of their high school.  AP courses develop advanced reading, writing, and thinking skills that benefit students in their post-secondary pursuits.  These courses require work outside the classroom, during summer and breaks.  Students should consider their academic, social, work, and extra-curricular activities before undertaking the commitment of an Advanced Placement course.  Students will not be allowed to drop an AP course after they have signed up and courses are scheduled. This is a one-year course; students may not drop at semester.   


Advanced Placement Environmental Science - 80370S1 and 80370S2


Credit:  1.0
Course Length:  Year
Grades: 10-12
Prerequisites: Successful completion of one year of life science, and a minimum of Algebra I.  Completion of Chemistry is also highly recommended.

Expenses:  It is highly recommended that students purchase an AP textbook (approx. $100.00).
AP Exam:  Students enrolled in the course are expected to take the National AP Exam in May (Approximately $93).

This course will provide students with the scientific principles, concepts, and methodologies required to understand the interrelationships of the natural world, to identify and analyze environmental problems both natural and human-made, to evaluate the relative risks associated with these problems, and to examine alternative solutions for resolving and/or preventing them.

Advanced Placement courses allow students to take the challenge of college-level courses while in the familiar surroundings of their high school.  AP courses develop advanced reading, writing, and thinking skills that benefit students in their post-secondary pursuits.  These courses require work outside the classroom, during summer and breaks.  Students should consider their academic, social, work, and extra-curricular activities before undertaking the commitment of an Advanced Placement course.  Students will not be allowed to drop an AP course after they have signed up and courses are scheduled. This is a one-year course; students may not drop at semester. 


  General Physics: 80430S1 and 80430S2  
    

Credit: 1.0

Course Length: Year

              Grades: 10 - 12

Prerequisites: Concurrent enrollment in Algebra II/Trig or higher. Successful completion of Algebra and Geometry recommended.

Expenses: None

Physics is the search for the fundamental laws of nature; it is the basic science from which all the others are derived. Physics is the most rapidly developing field of knowledge that there is. A logical, problem solving approach to the development of the major physics principles will be used to develop your abilities to interrelate the major concepts of physics.


Advanced Placement Physics I: Algebra based - 80656S1 and 80656S2



Credit: 1.0
Course Length:  Year
Grades: 11-12

Prerequisites:  Concurrent enrollment in Algebra II/Trig or higher
Expenses:  It is highly recommended that students purchase an AP textbook (approx.$100.00). 
AP Exam:  Students enrolled in the course are expected to take the National AP Exam in May (Approximately $93).


AP Physics 1 is an algebra-based, introductory college-level physics course. Students cultivate their understanding of physics through inquiry based
investigations as they explore these topics: kinematics; dynamics; circular motion and gravitation; energy; momentum; simple harmonic motion; torque
and rotational motion; electric charge and electric force; DC circuits; and mechanical waves and sound. 



Advanced Placement Physics C - 80655S1 and 80655S2


Credit: 1.0
Course Length:  Year
Grade: 10 – 12

Prerequisites: Advised concurrent enrollment in Calculus but not required.

Expenses:  It is highly recommended that students purchase an AP textbook (approx.$100.00). 
AP Exam:  Students enrolled in the course are expected to take the National AP Exam in May (Approximately $93).

This course covers the motion of particles, forces, work, energy, collisions, rotation, rolling, torque, angular momentum, gravitation, and oscillations.  These topics will be studied at the college freshman, science major, level.  Calculus will be used as the mathematical language and problem solving tool.  Upon completing the course work students will have the opportunity to take the AP Physics C Mechanics Exam.  The exam is equivalent to a first semester college exam for engineering or science majors.

Advanced Placement courses allow students to take the challenge of college-level courses while in the familiar surroundings of their high school.  AP courses develop advanced reading, writing, and thinking skills that benefit students in their post-secondary pursuits.  These courses require work outside the classroom, during Summer and breaks.  Students should consider their academic, social, work, and extra-curricular activities before undertaking the commitment of an Advanced Placement course.  Students will not be allowed to drop an AP course after they have signed up and courses are scheduled. This is a one-year course; students may not drop at semester.   


Geology – 80575  


Credit: 0 .5
Grade: 11 – 12, 10th with Teacher recommendation
Prerequisites:  Algebra I math skills are critical to students success in this course.

Expense:  Expense:  $5 fee (all fees subject to change pending BOE approval)

Geology is the study of the earth, its formation, and processes that shape it.  It is a survey course that includes major topics such as rocks, minerals, plate tectonics, natural resources and Colorado Geology.  Douglas County School District science standards 1 and 4.1 are addressed throughout the course.  Syllabus may vary with emphasis from school to school.  One field trip is required.


Astronomy - 80600

Credit:  0.5
Grades:  10-12
Prerequisites:  Passed full credit of one (1) other science credit or teacher recommendation.
Expense:  $5 fee (all fees subject to change pending BOE approval)

Astronomy is the study of the universe.  Major topics include:  The characteristics of our solar system, the lives of stars and the history of astronomy.  Students will learn the names of constellations and stars of the night sky and how astronomy is directly related to contemporary culture.  Controversies such as alien life, extinction events and funding of the space program will be explored.   Attendance at one evening star gazing is required. 

*CCHE credit may be applied dependent upon where this course is taken in sequence with other science classes.   See your counselor for more information


Genetics - 80550

Credit:  0.5
Grades:  11-12
Prerequisites: Recommended “C” or better in Biology or teacher recommendation.
Expense:  
$5 lab fee (all fees subject to change pending BOE approval); It is highly recommended students purchase a lab book, goggles and a TI-83, TI-83 Plus or TI-84 calculator.

Genetics is a broad field whose applications include such diverse fields as agriculture, law enforcement and medicine.  This survey course will focus on genetics in a modern context, examining how our knowledge of DNA and genes has guided our understanding of the living world.  Students will do extensive work in the laboratory and on library and computer-based projects.  Topics to be covered will include: (1) chemical and physical basis of heredity, (2) Mendelian and non-Mendelian patterns of inheritance, (3) human genetics, (4) biotechnology, and (5) legal and ethical issues in modern genetics.

*CCHE credit may be applied dependent upon where this course is taken in sequence with other science classes.   See your counselor for more information.


Anatomy and Physiology I - 80525

Credit:  0.5
Grades:  11-12
Prerequisites:  Recommended “C” or better in Biology
Expense: $20.00 lab fee 
(all fees subject to change pending BOE approval)

Anatomy and Physiology I is an advanced course for students who are interested in exploring human body functions and structures in great depth.  Students will be expected to conduct numerous laboratory investigations. Human health and disease will be emphasized and explored through inquiry.  This course is designed for the biology/health care related student; however, the non-biology major will benefit as well.  Dissection will be a requirement of this class.


Anatomy and Physiology II - 80526

Credit:  0.5
Grades:  11-12
Expense:  $20.00 lab fee (all fees subject to change pending BOE approval)

Anatomy and Physiology II is a continuation of Anatomy and Physiology I.  It is designed for the biology/health care related student.  This course will cover the body systems not explored in depth in A&P I.  Students will be expected to conduct numerous laboratory investigations. 


Zoology - 80500


Credit:  0.5
Grades:  10-12

Prerequisite:  Successful completion of Biology and/or teacher recommendation
Expenses:  Dissection fee $10

Zoology is a course designed to present the student with representatives of all the major animal groups, their comparative anatomy, evolutionary origins and record, ecology, and behavior. It is primarily lab-oriented with dissections. 

Course Objectives:

  1. Derive the phylogeny of animal taxa using informative characteristics
  2. Compare and contrast sexual and asexual reproductive strategies
  3. Distinguish embryologic developmental stages of vertebrates
  4. Compare form and function relationships within animal groups and across key taxa of invertebrate and vertebrate animals 
  5. Explain the similarities and differences among major body plans 
  6. Assess how animals interact with their environment including key adaptations found within taxa of invertebrate and vertebrate animals
  7. Relate animal adaptations including behaviors to the ecological roles of animals

International Baccalaureate Group 4: Experimental Sciences







IB Biology HL I – 80358S1 and 80358S2
IB Biology HL I is the first year of a two- year sequence. Students selecting HL courses during the junior year are committed to completing the senior year of the two-year sequence.

IB Biology  HL II – 80354S1 and 80354S2
IB Biology HL is a two-year sequence with IB exams at the end of the second year. 
This course fulfills the Group 4 requirements for the IB Diploma Programme and is open to IB Course students on an availability basis. Submission of the Course Student Commitment Form to the IB office, room C120, is required at the beginning of the course.

Credit: 2.0
Grade:  11 and 12

Prerequisites: Successful completion of Biology and/or Chemistry and/or Physics; The Honors pathway is recommended.

Course description: 

  • This course is a two-year course at the HL level only.
  • IB Biology emphasizes an investigative approach to science. Students will be expected to design and carry out experimental procedures, as well as apply theoretical principles and analyze results. 
  • Students also develop an awareness of moral and ethical issues, and examining local and global issues fosters a sense of social responsibility.
  • Studies the biology topics of cells, chemistry of life, genetics, ecology, evolution, plant science and human health and physiology.
  • Develops in students the ability to complete investigative science through the requirement of sixty hours of lab work.





IB Chemistry SL – 80382S1 and 80382S2

This course fulfills the Group 4 or Group 6 requirements for the IB Diploma Programme and is open to IB Course students on an availability basis. Submission of the Course Student Commitment Form to the IB office, room C120, is required at the beginning of the course.

Credit: 1.0
Grades:  11 or 12

Prerequisites: Successful completion of Honors Chemistry or Chemistry

Course description: 

  • This course is a one-year course at the Standard Level only. It may be offered on alternating years based upon enrolment numbers.
  • IB Chemistry emphasizes an investigative approach to science. Students will be expected to design and carry out experimental procedures, as well as apply theoretical principles and analyze results. 
  • Students explore the moral and ethical issues involved in local and global issues surrounding natural resources in order to foster a sense of social responsibility.
  • Introduces students to the theories and practical techniques involved in the composition, characterization, and transformation of substance.





IB Physics SL – 80453S1 and 80453S2

This course fulfills the Group 4 or Group 6 requirements for the IB Diploma Programme and is open to IB Course students on an availability basis. Submission of the Course Student Commitment Form to the IB office, room C120, is required at the beginning of the course.

Credit: 1.0
Grades:  11 or 12

Prerequisites: Successful completion of Physics, or teacher recommendation; Concurrent enrollment in Alg II/Trig or higher

Course description:

  • This course is a one-year course at the Standard Level only. It may be offered on alternating years based upon enrolment numbers.
  • IB Physics emphasizes an investigative approach to science. Students will be expected to design and carry out experimental procedures, as well as apply theoretical principles and analyze results. 
  • Students also develop an awareness of moral and ethical issues, and examining local and global issues fosters a sense of social responsibility.
  • Introduces students to the laws of physics, the experimental skills required in physics, and the social and historical aspects of physics as an evolving body of human knowledge about nature.
  • Develops in students the ability to complete investigative science through the requirement of forty hours of lab work.





IB Environmental Systems/Societies SL - 80383S1 and 80383S2 

This course fulfills the Group 4 requirements for the IB Diploma Programme and is open to IB Course students on an availability basis. Submission of the Course Student Commitment Form to the IB office, room C120, is required at the beginning of the course.

Credit: 1.0
Grades:  11 or 12

Prerequisite:  Successful completion of Biology and/or Chemistry; The Honors pathway is recommended, but not required.

Course description:

  • IB Environmental Systems and Societies is an interdisciplinary course that provides a coherent perspective of the interrelationships between environmental systems and societies, allowing students to evaluate the scientific, ethical, and socio-political aspects of issues.  
  • Topics include ecosystems, biodiversity, population dynamics, pollution, Earth systems and resources, land and water use, energy resources, and global change. 
  • This course incorporates a hands-on approach to learning science.  Students will be expected to design and carry out experimental procedures as well as apply theoretical principles, and analyze experimental results.

Douglas County School District has a minimum graduation requirement of 3.0 credits in Social Studies to be eligible for graduation.  For students intending to go on to college, it is highly recommended that they take at least 4.0 credits of Social Studies classes.  The following “Curriculum Map” is intended to layout the classes required and/or recommended for a variety of academic paths toward graduation and/or post graduation preparation.  Please carefully read and understand the “Curriculum Map” so each student is taking the classes he/she needs to prepare for his/her future.

ThunderRidge High School requires each student take the following Social Studies classes in order to be eligible for graduation:

1.0 in US History 

1.5 of Social Studies History and/or Electives 

0.5 in Government (or AP United States History)

 3.0 Total Minimum

Reminder: Colleges will expect students to take 4 years of rigorous Social Studies classes.  Please ensure students are prepared for college by taking the classes they need.

In addition to the Social Studies classes required for graduation and/or recommended for college preparation, all ThunderRidge students are encouraged to take optional Social Studies Electives offered by the department.  More detailed class descriptions are found under the Social Studies section of this Academic Planning Guide.  The following elective options are available:

Psychology
Positive Psychology
Sociology
World Religions
Geography
World History
Modern World History
Contemporary World Issues
AP Psychology
AP U.S. Government
AP Macroeconomics
Philosophy

NOTE:  Students and parents are encouraged to check with potential colleges for specific admissions requirements in social studies.


U.S. History, 1865 - Present - 85650S1 and 85650S2

Credit:  1.0
Grades:  9-12

This course is designed for students who did not pass the U.S. History/Literature Humanities block or who need American History credit for graduation.  This course meets the District’s requirement and standards for U.S. History.  NOTE:  Freshmen are to take a Humanities Block course (see “Social Studies Curriculum Map” above or the "English" course description pages for details).


Honors US History: 1865-Present (Honors American History) - 85552S1 and 85552S2

Credit:  1.0
Grade:  9
Prerequisite:  Teacher recommendation

This course is an interdisciplinary Humanities block; however, the Honors course challenges students to go beyond the traditional curricular study to pursue a more in-depth investigation of the content. The course is demanding and will require a greater commitment of time and effort.  Students should also expect to read texts of greater volume and difficulty.  This course will focus on preparing students for future Advanced Placement classes.  
NOTE:  Freshmen are to take a Humanities Block course (see “Social Studies Curriculum Map” above or the "English" course description pages for details).

Students who are planning to take Advanced Placement or International Baccalaureate classes during high school are encouraged to enroll in honors courses.  Honors courses are specifically designed to develop reading, writing, and critical thinking skills that support success in higher level courses and post-secondary success.


World History/Geography – 85302 and 85834  
     
     
Credit:  1.0
Grade:  10

This semester long class examines ancient and medieval world cultures with an emphasis on the religions of man, mythology, and philosophy.  Students will compare historical events with contemporary issues enabling them to understand the relevance of history to our lives today.  This class meets District’s requirements and standards for a semester of World History.


Honors World History/Honors Geography – 85450S1 and 85837

Credit:  1.0
Grade:  10

Students will compare historical events with contemporary issues enabling them to understand the relevance of history to our lives today.  The Honors class challenges students to go beyond the traditional curricular study to pursue a more in-depth study of the content.  The course is demanding and will require a greater commitment of time and effort.  Students should also expect to read texts of greater volume and difficulty.  This course will focus on preparing students for future Advanced Placement Classes.


Modern World History - 85380S1 and 85380S2

Credit:  1.0
Grades:  11-12

Modern World History will begin with the rise of the modern nations state and concludes in the modern era.  It emphasizes clear and effective writing while exploring the literature of contemporary authors.  Students have the opportunity to read and analyze a variety of texts including nonfiction, short story, novel, drama, and poetry.  Additionally, students will participate in analytic reading, and examination of effective models for writing while also studying grammar and vocabulary.


U.S. Economics - 85800

Credit:  0.5
Grades:  11-12

This semester long course examines basic micro and macro economic concepts and the types of economic systems.  With emphasis on the modern American economy, students will examine and analyze investments, productivity, fiscal and monetary policies.  This class meets the district’s requirements and standards for Economics.


U.S. Government - 85700

Credit:  0.5
Grades: 11-12

This semester long course examines the basic concepts of government systems with particular emphasis on the American Constitution.  Students will examine the founding principles of the United States through the lens of current events.  The class meets the district’s requirements and standards for Government.


Geography - 85834

Credit:  0.5
Grades:  11-12

This semester long class examines both physical and cultural geography.  Besides learning basic geographic knowledge and themes, students will wrestle with issues in the areas of development, population, food supply, energy, the environment, cities, and the future.  This class meets District’s requirements and standards for Geography.


Psychology - 85750

Credit:  0.5 
Grades: 11-12

This course focuses on the essential questions concerning human behavior.  In Psychology, students will address these issues through an examination of current research on the functions of the brain and through analyzing various environmental influences in order to assess their relative impacts upon behavior.  This single semester class meets the District’s requirements for Social Studies elective credit.  Because Psychology is for elective credit, students must check with their counselor to be sure all District Social Studies requirements have been completed.  


Intro to Positive Psychology - 85757

Credit: 0.5 Elective Credit
Grades: 11-12
Prerequisite: Semester of General Psychology or semester of AP Psychology


Introduction to Positive Psychology is a semester course for juniors and seniors.  Introductory Psychology or a semester of AP Psychology will be a prerequisite.  The class will tackle content with psychological research-based facts, studies, and exercises that deal with what it takes to gain positive well-being in the short-term and long-term.  Topic will include, but are not limited to: identifying one’s character strengths, identifying one’s personality traits, optimism, gratitude, how to experience positive emotions, how to have positive relationships, how to be engaged, and answering the call of your “dark side.” 




Sociology - 85770


Credit:  0.5 
Grades:  11-12

This semester long class will examine the scientific study of human social relationships and group life.  Social interaction, or the responses of individuals to each other, is the basic sociological concept, because such interaction is the elementary component of all relationships and groups that make up society.  Students will discuss the roles of family, gender, class, race, etc.  Sociology is an elective credit.  Students must check with their counselor to ensure all District Social Studies requirements have been completed.


World Religions – 85870

Credit: 0.5
G
rades:  10-12

This course will prepare the student to understand and participate in the ever-increasing interactions among all nations and cultures of the world. The student will leave the class with basic knowledge of the five major religions of the world along with a stronger philosophical understanding of themselves and of other peoples and cultures. This knowledge is imperative in preparation for college and the international world that our students are inheriting. 


Contemporary World Issues - 85745


Credit: 0.5 Social Studies Elective Credit
Grades: 11-12
Prerequisite: None


Topics that will be covered, but not limited to, are: U.S.-Middle East foreign policy, human rights struggles around the world, energy usage and resources, the United States debt, the effects of technology on well-being, the study of happiness, and Colorado political and economic issues.  Students will be required to stay current on world, national, and local issues of importance.  This upper level course will focus on the analysis and interpretation of contemporary domestic and world issues. Students will examine current events through themes such as Power, Conflict, Justice, and Technology. Debate, research, discussion, critical thinking, and media analysis are all skills that will be applied during the course of the semester. 

Philosophy – 50908 - Spring semester only 

Credit: 0.5 Elective Credit
Grades:  11-12

This course will introduce students to some of the “classics” of western philosophy. We will read and discuss some of the most influential thinkers in the history of western philosophy. The readings will span more than two thousand years of western thought in which students will see how important philosophical ideas have changed over time.  
Perhaps the most important thing to be gained from this class is not an acquaintance with various facts and theories from the history of philosophy, but the development of reasoning skills.  The study of philosophy develops one's ability to think carefully and critically. The objective of this course is to enable students to be reflective about the beliefs that they or their society have developed.


Advanced Placement World History – 85340S1 and 85340S2


Credit: 1.0
Grade:  10
Prerequisite:  Successful completion of US History
Expenses:  It is highly recommended that students purchase an AP textbook.
AP Exam:  Students enrolled in the course are expected to take the National AP Exam in May (Approximately $93).

The purpose of the AP World History course is to develop greater understanding of the evolution of global processes and contacts in interaction with different types of human societies.; This understanding is advanced through a combination of selective factual knowledge and appropriate analytical skills.; The course highlights the nature of changes in international frameworks and their causes and consequences, as well as comparisons among major societies.; The course emphasizes relevant factual knowledge deployed in conjunction with leading interpretive issues and types of historical evidence.; The course builds on an understanding of culture, institutional, and technological precedents that, along with geography, set the human stage.; Periodization, explicitly discussed, forms an organizing principle for dealing with change and continuity throughout the course.


Advanced Placement courses allow students to take the challenge of college-level courses while in the familiar surroundings of their high school.  AP courses develop advanced reading, writing, and thinking skills that benefit students in their post-secondary pursuits.  These courses require work outside the classroom, during summer and breaks.  Students should consider their academic, social, work, and extra-curricular activities before undertaking the commitment of an Advanced Placement course.  Students will not be allowed to drop an AP course after they have signed up and courses are scheduled. This is a one-year course; students may not drop at semester.


Advanced Placement European History - 85500S1 and 85500S2


Credit:  1.0
Grades:  11-12

Prerequisite:  Successful completion of U.S. History, World History or AP World History
Expenses:  It is highly recommended that students purchase an AP textbook.
AP Exam:  Students enrolled in the course are expected to take the National AP Exam in May (Approximately $93).

This year-long course for juniors spans the period from the Late Medieval (1450) to present-day developments in the European history.  Intellectual-cultural, political-diplomatic, and social-economic facets of European traditions are addressed.  Further, the intent of the course is to expose the students to an understanding of some of the principle themes in modern history, and to use the techniques of historical analysis in creating well-organized essays.  The Advanced Placement Program is designed to provide students with a college level academic experience.  Students successfully mastering the course material may earn college credit on the AP European History exam, which is administered annually.  Because this AP course is a college level elective, students will be asked to purchase their materials in accordance with Douglas County Board of Education policy.

Advanced Placement courses allow students to take the challenge of college-level courses while in the familiar surroundings of their high school.  AP courses develop advanced reading, writing, and thinking skills that benefit students in their post-secondary pursuits.  These courses require work outside the classroom, during summer and breaks.  Students should consider their academic, social, work, and extra-curricular activities before undertaking the commitment of an Advanced Placement course.  Students will not be allowed to drop an AP course after they have signed up and courses are scheduled. This is a one-year course; students may not drop at semester. 


Advanced Placement U.S. History - 85625S1 and 85625S2



Credit:  1.0
Grade: 12
Prerequisite:  Successful completion of World History or AP World History
Expenses:  It is highly recommended that students purchase an AP textbook.
AP Exam:  Students enrolled in the course are expected to take the National AP Exam in May (Approximately $93).

This year long course for seniors is designed to provide students with the analytic skills and knowledge necessary to deal critically with the problems and issues in US History.  The course exposes students to a college level academic experience in the major cultural, social, political, economic, and historical issues found in US History from 1492 to present.  Students successfully mastering the course material may earn college credit on the AP US History exam, which is administered annually.  Because this AP course is a college level elective, students will be asked to purchase their materials in accordance with Douglas County Board of Education policy.

Advanced Placement courses allow students to take the challenge of college-level courses while in the familiar surroundings of their high school.  AP courses develop advanced reading, writing, and thinking skills that benefit students in their post-secondary pursuits.  These courses require work outside the classroom, during summer and breaks.  Students should consider their academic, social, work, and extra-curricular activities before undertaking the commitment of an Advanced Placement course.  Students will not be allowed to drop an AP course after they have signed up and courses are scheduled. This is a one-year course; students may not drop at semester. 


 Advanced Placement Macroeconomics – 85631

Credit: ( 0.5)
Grades:  11-12
Prerequisite: (none)
Expenses: 
It is highly recommended that students purchase an AP textbook
AP Exam:  Students enrolled in the course are expected to take the National AP Exam in May (Approximately $93).

AP Macroeconomics is an exciting and important course that teaches students to understand economics on a large scale, including the economies of nations.  You learn basic economic concepts as well as how to understand and interpret GDP, unemployment, and inflation to measure the economic performance of a nation.  You will also learn about the financial sector which includes the Federal Reserve, monetary and fiscal policy, and money.  This course is open to all and is highly recommended for students interested in business, finance, and the social sciences.


Advanced Placement Psychology - 85760S1 and 85760S2


Credit:  1.0
Grades: 11-12
Prerequisite:  Grade of “C” or above in Biology or Anatomy
Expenses:  It is highly recommended that students purchase an AP textbook
AP Exam:  Students enrolled in the course are expected to take the National AP Exam in May (Approximately $93).

This year long course for juniors or seniors is designed to introduce the systematic and scientific study of the behavior and mental processes of human beings and other animals.  Included is a consideration of the psychological facts, principles, and phenomena associated with each of the major sub-fields within psychology.  Students also learn about the ethics and methods psychologists use in their science and practice.

Advanced Placement courses allow students to take the challenge of college-level courses while in the familiar surroundings of their high school.  AP courses develop advanced reading, writing, and thinking skills that benefit students in their post-secondary pursuits.  These courses require work outside the classroom, during summer and breaks.  Students should consider their academic, social, work, and extra-curricular activities before undertaking the commitment of an Advanced Placement course.  Students will not be allowed to drop an AP course after they have signed up and courses are scheduled. This is a one-year course; students may not drop at semester.   


Advanced Placement United States Government and Politics - 85720


Credit:  0.5
Grade: 12
Prerequisite:  Successful completion of World History or AP World History
Expenses:  It is highly recommended that students purchase an AP textbook.
AP Exam:  Students enrolled in the course are expected to take the National AP Exam in May (Approximately $93).

This semester long course will give students an analytical perspective on government and politics in the United States.  This course includes both the study of general concepts used to interpret U.S. politics and the analysis of specific examples.  It also requires familiarity with the various institutions, groups, beliefs, and ideas that constitute U.S politics.  The Advanced Placement Program is designed to provide students with a college level academic experience.  Students successfully mastering the course material may earn college on the AP National Exam.  Because this AP course is a college level elective, students will be asked to purchase their materials in accordance with Douglas County Board of Education policy.

Advanced Placement courses allow students to take the challenge of college-level courses while in the familiar surroundings of their high school.  AP courses develop advanced reading, writing, and thinking skills that benefit students in their post-secondary pursuits.  These courses require work outside the classroom, during summer and breaks.  Students should consider their academic, social, work, and extra-curricular activities before undertaking the commitment of an Advanced Placement course.  Students will not be allowed to drop an AP course after they have signed up and courses are scheduled. 


International Baccalaureate: Group 3: Individuals and Societies


IB European History HL I and IB 2Oth Century Europe HL II

IB History HL is a two year sequence with  IB exams at the end of the second year.  This course fulfills the Group 3 requirements for the IB Diploma Programme and is open to IB Course students on an availability basis. Submission of the Course Student Commitment Form to the IB office, room C120, is required at the beginning of the course.

Credit: 2.0
Grade:  11 and 12

IB European History HL I – 85516S1 and 85516S2
IB European History HL I is the first year of a two- year sequence. Students selecting HL courses during the junior year are committed to completing the senior year of the two-year sequence.

Credit:  Grade:  11
Prerequisites:  Recommended Honors History 9 and Honors History 10 or AP World History.

Course description:

  •  IB History is a required course for IB Diploma students. 
  • This course explores political, economic, social, and intellectual currents in the development of Europe from 1500-9160. 
  • Particular emphasis is given to the history of Europe since the Enlightenment Age.

IB 20th Century Europe HL II – 85805S1 and 85805S2
This course is the second year of a two-year course sequence at the Higher Level.  It is also open to IB Course students as a one-year History SL course.

Grade:  11 or 12 for SL examination
Grade: 12 for HL

Prerequisite successful completion of IB European History HL I for testing HL.

Course description:

  • It is a required course for the International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme. 
  • This course will examine the nature of 20th century conflicts.  Focus will be on the Cold War and the creation of contemporary Europe. 
  • The course develops in studenst an international awareness and understanding by promoting empathy with, and understanding of people living in diverse places and at different times.





IB Theory of Knowledge (TOK I) – 85885 Junior  
Credit: 0.5 per semester
Grades:  11-12

Fulfills the requirements for the IB Diploma Programme.

Open to non-IB diploma students. Availability based upon diploma student enrollment.​

​ Submission of the Course Student Commitment Form to the IB office, room C120 is required at time of registration. 
This course is only available Spring semester.


IB Theory of Knowledge (TOK II) -  85884 Senior

Credit: 0.5 per semester
Grades:  12

Fulfills the requirements for the IB Diploma Programme.

Open to full IBDP Seniors only. 

Prerequisite:  TOK II is the second semester of a two semester sequence.  Students must have successfully completed TOK I.

Course description: 

  • This course is unique to the IBDP and is an interdisciplinary requirement intended to stimulate critical reflection on the knowledge and experience gained inside and outside the classroom.  
  • This course challenges students to explore the basis of knowledge, the way we know what we know, to examine questions of bias and to develop the ability to analyze evidence expressed in argument. 
  • This course spans the second semester of Junior year and first semester of Senior year.

Pre-Algebra Strategies - 20020S1 and 20020S2

Credit:  1.0 Math Credit year long class
Grades:  9-12
Prerequisite: Teacher approval is required.

This course is designed for students with an IEP to prepare them for Algebra in the general curriculum.  Students will review fractions, decimals, integers, order of operations, percentages, exponents, ration and proportions, geometry and graphing in the coordinate plane.  Students will begin working with variables to simplify algebraic expressions, inequalities/equalities and solve equations.  Math standards have been modified and students will be evaluated by IEP goals and objectives.


Basic Communications - 20015S1 and 20015S2

Year: 1.0 Elective Credit
Grades: 9-12
Prerequisite:  Teacher approval is required. 

This course is designed to increase students receptive, expressive and pragmatic language skills.  Students will focus on both oral and written language skills. 


Essential Learning Strategies -  20050S1 and 20050S2  

Year: 1.0 Elective Credit
Grades: 9-10
Prerequisite:  Teacher approval is required.

This course is for students with an Individualized Education Plan who require extra assistance in improving academic performance, decision making, problem solving, communication and organization. Topics of instruction may include note taking, organization tools, time management, test taking strategies, self-advocacy and understanding of IEP, as well as reading, writing and communication strategies. This course can be repeated for credit.


Career Strategies - 20170S1 and 20170S2

Year: 1.0 Elective Credit
Grades: 11-12
Prerequisite: Teacher approval is required.

This course is for students with an Individualized Education Plan requiring assistance in post-secondary planning. Topics of study will include, but are not limited to, exploring career/vocational opportunities, complete career interest inventories/surveys/profiles, use of Naviance for post-secondary planning, complete transition portfolios, create resumes, develop interview skills, and develop an understanding of job retention skills needed for employment. Students will have the opportunity to participate in field trips to vocational schools and job sites to expose them to viable career paths. Guest speakers representing various careers/occupations will present information to students. This course can be repeated for credit.


Internship Strategies - 20175S1 and 20175S2  

Year: 1.0 Elective Credit
Grades: 9-12
Prerequisite: Teacher approval is required.

This course is specifically designed for students with an Individualized Education Plan (IEP) who are interested in obtaining unpaid work experience in various career areas. Students will work on or off campus at a job site learning vocational/career skills and on-the-job social skills. This is an elective class and may be taken more than once for credit.


Life Skills Math - 20005S1 and 20005S2  

Credit:  1.0 Math Credit year long class
Grades: 11-12
Prerequisite: Teacher approval is required.

This course is designed for juniors and seniors with an Individualized Education Plan. Emphasis is placed on practical, consumer-oriented math skills in order to prepare students with the independent living skills necessary such as personal finance, housing, transportation cost, and monthly budgeting. 


Life Skills Science - 20006S1 and 20006S2

Credit:  1.0 Science Credit year long class
Grades:  9-12
Prerequisite: Teacher approval is required.

This course is for students with Significant Needs with an Individualized Education Plan. Emphasis will be based on student’s individual needs, vocational skills, hygiene, nutrition and health.


Life Skills English - 20008S1 and 20008S2

Credit:  1.0 English Credit year long class
Grades:  9-12
Prerequisite: Teacher approval is required.

This course is for students with Significant Needs on an Individualized Education Plan. Based upon student's individual needs, an emphasis will be placed on functional reading and writing skills. English standards have been modified and will be evaluated by IEP goals and objectives.


Life Skills Social Studies - 20032S1 and 20032S2

Credit:  1.0 Social Studies Credit year long class
Grades:  9-12
Prerequisite: Teacher approval is required.

This course is for students with Significant Needs on an Individualized Education Plan. Emphasis will be based on student’s individual needs, current events and life in the community.


ESL - English as a Second Language


ESL/English - 40600S1 and 40600S2

Credit:  1.0 English Credit year long class
Grades:  9-12
Prerequisite:  Teacher approval is required.

ESL English for English Credit focuses on enhancing content and language to support students in developing their proficiency in English.


ESL/Elective - 40604S1 and 40604S2

Credit:  1.0 Elective Credit year long class
Grades:  9-12
Prerequisite:  Teacher approval is required.

This course offers extended opportunities for all English learners to practice literacy skills - listening, speaking, reading, and writing. In addition to developing literacy skills, students will have resource time to get additional support from teachers in their content classes and the ESL teacher.

Introduction to Engineering – 80345

Credit: 0.5 Practical Art Credit
Grades: 9-12
Prerequisite: Algebra I
Expenses:  Course fee of $50 (all fees subject to change pending BOE approval); TI-83 or higher graphing calculator recommended

Introduction to Engineering is a semester long class.  This class is designed to open the door to the principles of engineering as described by the American Society of Engineering Education (ASEE). Students will be working in groups that will perform several engineering projects that will help the student understand and experience what engineers do.  Topics of study will include:

  •  Engineering design
  • Application of science and technology in engineering
  • The scope of engineering
  • Communication involved with engineering
  • How engineering addresses the needs of society

Projects include building structures, designing devices from Lego kits, and designing and programing industrial robots. Students completing this course can move on to more advanced engineering courses in the future.  Though the course number indicates semester one (S1), the class may be scheduled either first or second semester.



Engineering I - 80332


Credit: 0.5 Practical Art Credit

Grades: 9-12

Prerequisite: Introduction to Engineering
Expense:  Course fee of $50 
(all fees subject to change pending BOE approval)


Engineering 1 is a semester long class.  This class is designed to thoroughly explore the principles of engineering as described by the American Society of Engineering Education (ASEE). The students will not only design projects but use modeling Fischertechniks  to predict if their designs will work. Students will explore modeling Fischertechniks involving center of mass, force of tension and compression and electronics.  Performing these engineering projects extends students' understanding and experiences with what engineers do.  Students will thoroughly explore topics of: 

  • Engineering design
  • Application of science and technology in engineering
  • The scope of engineering
  • Communication involved with engineering
  • How engineering addresses the needs of society 

Projects include designing structures, model airplanes, electronic devices and remote controlled vehicles.


Engineering II - 80334

Credit: 0.5 Practical Art Credit
Grades: 10-12
Prerequisite: Introduction to Engineering and Engineering I
Expense:  Course fee of $50 
(all fees subject to change pending BOE approval)

Engineering II is a semester long class.  This class is designed to apply the principles of engineering as described by the American Society of Engineering Education (ASEE) to real world situations.  The course will model a real engineering company.  Students will select a field of engineering to focus on and work as a department within that community.  The different departments must work together to accomplish real world tasks.  Students will have to manage time, budget and supplies to successfully accomplish their tasks.

Students will thoroughly explore topics of:

  • Engineering design
  • Application of science and technology in engineering
  • The scope of engineering
  • Communication involved with engineering
  • How engineering addresses the needs of society

Projects will incorporate kits and resources from Introduction to Engineering and Engineering I.  Students will also exploit 3D printing and laser cutting devices to make unique, one of a kind parts to modify and connect different kits for a common goal.


Engineering III - 80336

Credit:  0.5 Practical Art Credit
Grades:  10-12
Prerequisite:  The students must complete the three previous semesters of the engineering program (Introduction to Engineering, Engineering 1 and Engineering 2)
Expense:  Course fee of $50 
(all fees subject to change pending BOE approval)

Engineering 3 is the culminating class of a four semester curriculum.

  • Semester 1: Introduction to Engineering
  • Semester 2: Engineering 1
  • Semester 3: Engineering 2
  • Semester 4: Engineering 3

This class will allow the students an opportunity to experience a culminating test of their engineering skills. The class will provide them with a great picture of what engineering is about.  The class will model an engineering firm that researches a need, develops and designs a proposal, executes that proposal and builds a product. The class will be broken into different departments that works on different aspects of the product. Throughout the class each department must maintain thorough communication with each other to complete the product.  Though the course number indicates semester one (S1), the class may be scheduled either first or second semester.


Multimedia I - Survey Course - 30575

Credit:  0.5 Practical Art Credit
Grades:  9-12
Prerequisite:  None
Expense:  
Course fee of  $35 fee per semester (all fees subject to change pending BOE approval)

Students will survey six media areas to compare, analyze, and will combine various multimedia software to determine their relationship. This course for computer literate students focuses on using a variety of software to develop multimedia productions. Students will create professional multimedia presentations that incorporate text, graphics, video, and sound. Students will be able to effectively maneuver through cyberspace, research, collect information, and be able to output that information in a professional, media-rich manner.  Students will have the opportunity to apply these skills while using advanced hardware and professional software. Students will also use design techniques to help create web pages and add to their videos


Multimedia II – Gaming/Programming (visual effects/design) – 31005

Credit: 0.5 Practical Art Credit
Grades: 9-12
Prerequisites: Multimedia I or Graphic Design I
Expense:  Course fee of $35 
(all fees subject to change pending BOE approval)

Create eye-catching video game scenes as you learn to apply design principles in simulated 3-D spaces.  Students will develop visual communication skills and ideation using traditional pencil and paper media, then transfer game visuals to the computer using Photoshop, Illustrator, and Cinema 4D software.  Storyboarding, character design, virtual environments, vehicle design, and basic animation will be addressed in a curriculum that emphasizes the importance of visual impact in the growing gaming industry.  


Multimedia II - Video Production - 31000

Credit: .05 Practical Art Credit
Grades: 9-12
Prerequisites: Multimedia I or teacher approval
Expense:  Course fee of $35 
(all fees subject to change pending BOE approval)

This semester-long course addresses both the technical and the journalistic aspects of broadcast journalism.  Students will focus on the content, style and technical aspects of broadcast journalism.  Topics also include general script writing, planning, use of camera shots and editing.  Students will learn how to write for broadcast, create video packages,  as well as how to operate cameras and lighting equipment.  Students will also create a variety of projects including a documentary, music video, and short films.

Although this course is suitable for anyone interested in journalism, it is geared towards those who wish to be well prepared for assuming roles on the high school broadcast staff. It is also excellent preparation for IB Film.


Multimedia II – 3D Animation – 31010

Credit:  0.5 Practical Art Credit
Grades:  9-12
Prerequisite:  Multimedia I or teacher approval 
Expense:  Course fee of $35 per semester (all fees subject to change pending BOE approval)

This course focuses on using advanced software applications for developing 2 and 3 dimensional animations.  Upon completion of this course, students will have the fundamental skills to create animated short movies and may take it more than one semester.


Multimedia II - Web Design - 30601

Credit:  0.5 Practical Art Credit
Grades:  9-12
Expense:  Course fee of $35 per semester (all fees subject to change pending BOE approval)

Students will move beyond the introductory level of electronic media for students to learn intermediate skills in web design. This course is a hands-on introduction to web techniques including: HTML, Dreamweaver, Fireworks, and Flash.  Students will also be introduced to web database technology, explore career options with the web design/development field, and create websites for mock clients.  Upon completion of this course, students will be able to create a complete website from start to finish reflecting a basic understanding of design and development practices.


Multimedia III - Advanced Video Game Art and Design (visual effects/design) - 31020

Credit: 0.5 Practical Art Credit
Grades: 10-12
Prerequisite: Multimedia II – Gaming/Programming
Expense:  Course fee of $35 per semester (all fees subject to change pending BOE approval)

Students continue the creation and refinement of storyboarding, character design, environments, and vehicle design. Clay models will be formed and then reproduced in the computer using Cinema 4D software.  Animation of 3D models will be investigated.



Programming and Mobile Apps - 30460

Credit: 0.5 Elective Credit
Grades: 10-12
Prerequisite: 
Multimedia I

This course teaches skills in one of the fastest growing areas of computer programming.  It is an introduction to building applications for mobile devices that use Apple’s iOS operating system and for mobile devices that use the Android operating system.  Student’s will choose a platform and specialize in that area.  Java programming language and Eclipse IDE will be used for developing Android apps and Objective C programming language and X-code for iPhone apps.  This course is for anyone with basic familiarity with computer programming, who wants to learn how to get started with mobile application development.  Though the course number indicates semester one (S1), the class may be scheduled either first or second semester.


IB Film Standard Level (SL) and IB Film Higher Level (HL)

IB Film may be taken as a one-year SL Course with assessments submitted at the end of the year, or taken as a two-year sequence for IB Film HL with assessments submitted at the end of the second year. This course fulfills the Group 6 requirements for the IB Diploma Programme and is open to IB Course students on an availability basis. Submission of the Course Student Commitment Form to the IB office, room C120, is required at the beginning of the course.

 IB Film SL - 70749S1 and 70749S2

Credit: 1.0
Grades:  11 or 12

Prerequisite: One of the following courses is highly recommended - Multimedia I, Multimedia II or Photography 

IB Film HL- 70750S1 and 70750S2
This is the second year in a two-year sequence, following IB Film SL.

Credit: 1.0
Grades:  12

Prerequisite: Successful completion of IB Film SL and teacher recommendation.

Course Descriptions          

  • The Diploma Programme film course explores film history, theory and socio-culture background through the study and analysis of film texts and exercises in film-making.
  • The course develops students’ critical abilities, enabling them to appreciate the multiplicity of cultural and historical perspectives in film.
  • To achieve an international understanding within the world of film, students are taught to consider film texts, theories and ideas from the points of view of different individuals, nations and cultures.
  • The Diploma Programme film course aims to develop students’ skills so that they become adept in both interpreting and making film texts. All IB Film assessments are project based.
  • Students in HL are expected to complete extensions of the core units adding depth and breadth the second year of study.
Theatre I - 70700

Credit: 0.5 Fine Art Credit
Grades:  9-12
Prerequisite:  None
Expense:  Course fee of $30 
(all fees subject to change pending BOE approval)

This course offers the opportunity for a variety of performance experiences, which may include the following: scene work, monologues, stage combat, improvisation, and pantomime. Major emphases of the class are on developing beginning acting skills and self esteem. It is suggested, but not required, the student take Theatre I in the fall and Theatre II in the spring.


Theatre II - 70710

Credit: 0.5 Fine Art Credit
Grades: 9-12
Prerequisite:  Theatre I
Expense:  Course fee of $30  
(all fees subject to change pending BOE approval)

As a continuation of Theatre I, this course extends development of acting skills and self esteem.  Course work may include the following: scene work, monologues, improvisation, play and character analysis, auditioning, musical theatre, and Shakespeare.  Participation in play production is encouraged.  It is suggested, but not required, that the student take Theatre I in the fall and Theatre II in the spring.  


Theatre III - 70720S1 and 70720S2

Credit: 1.0 Fine Art Credit
Grades:  10-12

Prerequisite:  Theatre I, Theatre II, and/or instructor’s approval|
Expense:  Course fee of $30 
(all fees subject to change pending BOE approval)

This course emphasizes the development of a higher level of acting skills.  Course work may include the following: improvisation, play and character analysis, directing, theatre history, musical theatre, stage combat, and advanced acting techniques. Participation in play production is strongly encouraged.  Work outside of class time is expected for rehearsal and performances. 


Theatre IV Director (Stage Directing and Acting) - 70730S1 and 70730S2

Credit: 1.0 Fine Art Credit
Grades: 11-12
Prerequisite: Theatre III and/or instructor’s approval
Expense:  Course fee of $30  
(all fees subject to change pending BOE approval)

This class allows students to pursue the fundamentals of stage direction. Course work may include the following: directing and advanced acting, film directing, script and character analysis, and design concepts. Work outside of class time is expected for rehearsal and performances. 


Theatre Production Ensemble - 70755S1 and 70755S2

Credit: 1.0 Fine Art Credit
Grades:  11-12
Prerequisite:  Audition and/or application
Expense:  Course fee of $30 
(all fees subject to change pending BOE approval)

This audition-only course is for the advanced theatre student. Students will develop advanced production techniques.  Play production is the core of this class.  There will be after school production requirements.


Technical Theatre I - 70780

Credit: 0.5 Fine Art Credit
Grades:  9-12
Prerequisite: Instructor’s Approval
Expense:  Course fee of $30  
(all fees subject to change pending BOE approval)

This course offers for students the opportunity to participate in phases of stagecraft activities. Course work may include the following: scenery construction, stage lighting, make-up, sound, publicity, design, theatre organization management, and maintenance.

This course can be taken for Practical Arts credit if the Fine Arts credit has been fulfilled.

American Sign Language I - 95300S1 and 95300S2

Credit: 1.0
Grades: 9-12
Prerequisite: none
Expenses: It is highly recommended that students purchase a workbook for this course.

American Sign Language (ASL) is a newly approved course that is accepted by the Colorado Council on Higher Education as a foreign language for college admission.  All four-year public colleges and universities in Colorado now accept ASL to meet the foreign language admission requirements.  For colleges and universities outside Colorado, and for privately funded colleges and universities, please check with the individual institution.  

In this course, the student will learn the basics of signing, including the alphabet, finger spelling, basic sign shapes, and basic vocabulary revolving around a variety of topics. Syntactic & morphological knowledge of American Sign Language (ASL), and basic conversational skills will be stressed. Vital aspects of deaf culture and community will be incorporated. Readiness activities will be conducted focusing on visual/receptive skills and basic communication.  The direct experience method, using ASL, will be used to enhance the learning process. Students must successfully complete this course prior to continuing on to ASL level 2. 

Assessments for ASL Level I:

  • Interpreting spoken English to ASL:  The student is able to interpret spoken English using ASL.
  • Interpreting ASL to spoken or written English:  The student is able to interpret ASL presented by the instructor or on video into spoken (or written) English.
  • Communication: The student is able to communicate using learned expressions on selected subjects.  She/he is able to ask and answer simple questions in ASL on the topics that have been studied.  Upon viewing a signed presentation or conversation, the student can answer questions regarding main idea and supporting ideas.
  • Culture: The student will recognize selected cultural concepts as they relate to daily life in the deaf community.  The student will be able to identify and discuss basic issues in the deaf community.

American Sign Language II – 95302S1 and 95302S2

Credit: 1.0
Grades:  10-12
Prerequisite:  Successful completion of ASL I.
                

This year-long course will expose students to vital aspects of deaf culture and community.  It emphasizes further development of receptive skills, expressive skills, application of syntactical and grammatical structures, and sign language colloquialisms used in conversational signing.


American Sign Language III – 95303S1 and 95303S2

Credit: 1.0
Grades:  10-12
Prerequisite:  Successful completion of ASL II.    
            

This course will reinforce the student’s exposure to vital aspects of deaf culture and community. It will extend proficiency of receptive skills, expressive skills, application of syntactical & grammatical structures and sign language colloquialisms used in conversational signing.  Further study of vocabulary, idioms, culture, ASL linguistics, word shapes, and topics will be essential for both left and right- handed students.  Students will study implementation of grammatical information through rule-governed movements of the face and head to find compelling meaning through a variety of facial behaviors.  Use of space as related to the signer is also significant and will be discussed.  ASL poetry and its significance in ASL linguistic studies will be introduced. Deaf culture, norms, and behaviors will be studied. 


American Sign Language IV -95304S1 and 95304S2

Credit:  1.0
Grades:  9-12
Prerequisite:  Successful completion of ASL III

The literacy centers will be used in this course. Further study of ASL and its grammar, syntax, and cultural features will be addressed. Students will write and sign stories of their bilingual/multicultural lives, as well as the bilingual, multicultural lives of other Deaf individuals as they acquire graphic design skills to illustrate various literary works.This course will address the question “how does one read/interpret and ‘write’ visual art and literary texts?” through ASL literature. ASL poetry, that was learned in ASL III, will be reinforced through poetry analysis. The direct experience method will be used to enhance the learning process and help students develop competency and fluency in the language.


Mandarin Chinese I - 95730S1 and 95730S2

Credit: 1.0
Grades: 9-12
Prerequisite:  None
Expenses:  It is highly recommended that students purchase a workbook for this course.

Students in this course will be prepared to speak, listen, read, and write using fundamental skills in Chinese and will learn the culture and other historical aspects of the Chinese civilization. Students will study simple grammatical structure, which includes word use and Chinese character use in sentence structure. Students are expected to practice their vocabulary words in Pinyin and written Chinese characters. Because the language is tonal in nature, this course requires good listening skills for speaking and listening. The National Standardized Chinese Proficiency Test, Hanyu Shuiping Kaoshi -- Beginning Level, developed by Beijing Language and Culture University, will be taken at the end of the year.


Mandarin Chinese II - 95731S1 and 95731S2

Credit: 1.0
Grades: 9-12
Prerequisite: Mandarin Chinese I
Expenses: It is highly recommended that students purchase a workbook for this course.

Students in this course will be prepared to speak, listen, read, and write using the fundamental skills in Chinese and will learn the culture and other aspects of the Chinese civilization. Students will study simple and intermediate grammatical structures, which includes word use and Chinese character use in sentence structure. Students are expected to practice their vocabulary words in Pinyin and written Chinese characters. Because the language is tonal in nature, this course requires good listening skills for speaking and listening. The National Standardize Chinese Proficiency Tests, Hanyu Shuiping Kaoshi – Beginning and Intermediate Levels, developed by Beijing Language and Culture University, will be taken at the end of the year which includes writing, reading, listening, speaking and culture.


Mandarin Chinese III – 95732S1 and 95732S2

Credit: 1.0
Grade:  9-12
Prerequisite: Mandarin Chinese II
Expenses: It is highly recommended that students purchase a workbook for this course.

Students in this course will be prepared to speak, listen, read, and write using the fundamental skills in Chinese and will learn the culture and other aspects of the Chinese civilization. Students will study simple and intermediate grammatical structures, which includes word use and Chinese character use in sentence structure. Students are expected to practice their vocabulary words in Pinyin and written Chinese characters. Because the language is tonal in nature, this course requires good listening skills for speaking and listening. The National Standardize Chinese Proficiency Tests, Hanyu Shuiping Kaoshi – Beginning and Intermediate Levels, developed by Beijing Language and Culture University, will be taken at the end of the year which includes writing, reading, listening, speaking and culture.


Mandarin Chinese IV – 95733S1 AND 95733S2 

Credit: 1.0
Grade:  9-12
Prerequisite: Mandarin Chinese III
Expense: It is highly recommended that students purchase a workbook for this course.

Students in this course will be prepared to speak, listen, read, and write using the fundamental skills in Chinese and will learn the culture and other aspects of the Chinese civilization. Students will study simple and intermediate grammatical structures, which includes word use and Chinese character use in sentence structure. Students are expected to practice their vocabulary words in Pinyin and written Chinese characters. Because the language is tonal in nature, this course requires good listening skills for speaking and listening. The National Standardize Chinese Proficiency Tests, Hanyu Shuiping Kaoshi – Beginning and Intermediate Levels, developed by Beijing Language and Culture University, will be taken at the end of the year: including writing, reading, listening, speaking and culture.


French I - 95400S1 and 95400S2

Spanish I - 95600S1 and 95600S2                                                                                      

Credit:  1.0
Grades:  9-12
Prerequisite:  None

Level I  courses in Foreign Language will prepare students to speak, read, write and listen in the target language (French or Spanish), and will focus on cultural information that will help them to get along if they are visiting foreign countries or are meeting foreign visitors.  Students will study simple grammatical structures, which include present tense and past tense verb conjugations, gender of nouns, adjective use and sentence structure.  Vocabulary study is an integral part of language learning and students are expected to continually practice their vocabulary words so that they will be able to communicate on a variety of topics.  All skills will be practiced through speaking, writing, listening, and reading in the target language.

Please note: After successful completion of Level I, students will proceed to Level 2.

Assessments for Level I Foreign Language:

  • Speaking: The student is able to speak using learned expressions or phrases on selected subjects.  She/he is able to ask and answer simple questions on the topics that have been studied.
  • Writing: The student is able to write paragraphs of 50 to 75 words on a variety of topics using memorized vocabulary and correct, basic sentence structure.
  • Reading: The student is able to read simple narratives written on familiar topics with recognizable vocabulary and cognates.  He/she can recognize familiar words in newspapers, advertisements, signs and maps.
  • Listening: The student is able to understand and respond appropriately to common memorized words and expressions when he/she hears the foreign language spoken.
  • Culture: The student will recognize selected cultural concepts as they relate to daily life in the countries studied.  The student will be able to locate the countries where the language is primarily spoken.

Accelerated Spanish I - 00160S1 and 00160S2

Credit: 1.0
Grades: 9 - 12
Prerequisite: Teacher approval

The Level I course is an accelerated language course designed for students who wish to reach the upper levels of foreign language in high school and have not had the opportunity to study the language previously. This course is equivalent to completion of Spanish I and Spanish 2.  Students will complete the two-year Level 1A/ Level 1B curriculum, as well as part A of the Level 2 curriculum in a one-year, fast-paced course. Students must be willing and able to commit to the required study time and effort for this intensive course. Students should expect daily homework. First semester of Level I will prepare students to speak read, write, and listen in the chosen language as well as learning cultural information that will help them get along if they are visiting foreign countries or are meeting foreign visitors. Students will study simple grammar structure, which includes present tense verb conjugations, past tense verb conjugations, present subjunctive conjugations, gender of nouns, adjective use and sentence structure. Vocabulary study is an integral part of language learning and students are expected to continually practice their vocabulary words so that they will be able to communicate on a variety of topics. All skills will be practiced through speaking, writing, listening, and reading .In the second semester of Level I, students will continue to learn the grammatical structures that will allow them to communicate on a simple level in the foreign language. The students will continue to use the past tense and subjunctive tense and talk and write about events that have already happened as well as those that they hope will happen. The study of vocabulary continues to be of utmost importance through all the levels of language study. Students will practice all skills through speaking, reading, writing, and listening.

Students who are planning to take Advanced Placement or International Baccalaureate classes during high school may enroll in accelerated courses.  Accelerated courses are specifically designed to develop reading, writing, and critical thinking skills that support success in higher level courses.


French II - 95410S1 and 95410S2

Spanish II - 95610S1 and 95610S2

Credit:  1.0
Grades:  9-12
Prerequisite: Successful completion of Level I with scores of 75% or better on each of the Level 1 Assessments.

After successful completion of Level I, the student is ready for Level II. Some of the finer grammatical points are learned at this level, making language use a little more sophisticated. The students continue learning to express past events and begin learning more complicated grammatical constructions.  Vocabulary learning continues to be an important component of language learning. Practice of all grammatical structures and vocabulary continues through speaking, writing, reading, and listening in the target language (French or Spanish).

Assessments for Level II Foreign Language:

  • Speaking: The student is able to express personal opinion and desires, and describe limited topics using learned grammatical structure and vocabulary.  The student is able to ask and answer questions on a variety of topics.
  • Writing: The student is able to write cogent 75-125 word compositions on selected topics using correct grammar and appropriate syntax and vocabulary.
  • Reading: The student is able to identify main ideas and derive general meaning form a prepared text.
  • Listening: The student is able to understand and reply appropriately to phrases used in high frequency social situations which include personal interests and daily activities.
  • Culture: The student can demonstrate an understanding of one or more elements of a selected culture by comparing or contrasting it/them to the same element in his/her own culture.  The student can identify some basic cultural information needed to function in a selected foreign country.

Accelerated Spanish II – 95720S1 and 95720S2

Credit: 1.0
Grades: 9-12
Prerequisite:  Completion of Accelerated Spanish I with a B or better or teacher approval

This level II course is an accelerated language course designed for students who wish to reach the upper levels of foreign language in high school or college.  After successful completion of Accelerated Level I assessments, the student is ready for Accelerated Level II. This course is equivalent to completion of Spanish 2B and Spanish 3.  Some of the finer grammatical points are learned at this level, making language use a little more sophisticated. The students continue learning to express past events and begin learning more complicated grammatical constructions. Vocabulary learning continues to be an important component of language learning. Practice of all grammatical structures and vocabulary continues through speaking, writing, reading, and listening. The assessment process continues in all skill areas on a regular basis with each quarter emphasizing one skill area at an advanced level (quarter 1=reading, quarter 2=listening, quarter 3=speaking, quarter 4=writing).  Speaking: The student is able to express personal opinion and desires, and describe topics using learned grammatical structure and vocabulary. The student is able to ask and answer questions on a variety of topics.  The student is able to describe pictures or scenes using appropriate and correct grammar and vocabulary.  The student must be able to speak for a five minute time period, with or without prompting.  Writing: The student is able to write cogent 125 word compositions on selected topics using correct grammar and appropriate syntax and vocabulary. Reading: The student is able to identify main ideas and derive general meaning from a prepared or authentic text. Listening: The student is able to construct meaning from various situations and apply knowledge to demonstrate comprehension. Culture: The student can demonstrate an understanding of one or more elements of a selected culture by comparing or contrasting it/them to the same element in his/her own culture. The student can identify some basic cultural information needed to function in a selected foreign country.

Students who are planning to take Advanced Placement or International Baccalaureate classes during high school should enroll in accelerated courses.  Accelerated courses are specifically designed to develop reading, writing, and critical thinking skills that support success in higher level courses.


French III - 95420S1 and 95420S2

Spanish III - 95620S1 and 95620S2

Credit:  1.0
Grades:  10-12
Prerequisite: Successful completion of Level II with scores of 75% or better on each of the Level 2 Assessments.

In Level III classes, the students continue to learn vocabulary and increasingly more complicated grammar and syntactical structures.  They begin fine tuning their language by learning expressions, constructions, and different verb tenses and moods that are more complicated and are more native-like in quality. The students’ and teacher’s use of the target language in the classroom increases greatly at this level of language learning.

Assessments for Level III Foreign Language:

  • Speaking: The student demonstrates the ability to maintain brief face-to-face conversations on selected topics.  The student is able to narrate stories, describe some situations and make his/her opinions known.
  • Writing: The student is able to compose cogent 100-150 word compositions using different tenses and appropriate vocabulary and syntax.
  • Reading: The student is able to read selected literary excerpts, articles and narratives identifying main ideas and supporting details.
  • Listening: The student is able to understand main ideas and supporting details when hearing the foreign language spoken on prepared video and audio tapes made by native speakers.
  • Culture: The student is able to demonstrate behavior which reflects cultural sensitivity in simulated social situations.  The student is also able to demonstrate knowledge of a selected region where the foreign language is spoken.

French IV - 95435S1 and 95435S2
Spanish IV - 95631S1 and 95631S2

Credit: 1.0
Grades: 11-12
Prerequisite: Successful completion of Level III
Expense: It is highly recommended that students purchase a workbook ($20.00) for this course.

Level IV classes are conducted entirely in the target language (French or Spanish). The students work on improving their fluency speaking, reading, writing and listening to the target language. Vocabulary study continues as does practice and review of the grammatical structures already learned. Classroom discussions are conducted on topics of interest to the students. The reading is from works of native authors.

The assessments for Level IV Foreign Language:

  • Speaking: The student demonstrates the ability to describe, paraphrase, ask and answer questions, initiate and sustain conversations on diverse topics.
  • Writing: Students demonstrate the ability to write cogent 150-200 word compositions on a variety of concrete topics using correct tenses, syntax, and vocabulary.
  • Reading: The student is able to read and understand selected native literature and authentic text.
  • Listening: The student is able to understand main ideas and some detail when listening to native speakers at normal conversational rate.
  • Culture: The student is able to respond appropriately to selected cultural behaviors in social situations. The student knows significant historical and geographical information about the countries where the language is spoken.

Advanced Placement Spanish Language V - 95640S1 and 95640S2 

Advanced Placement French Language V - 95440S1 and 95440S2

Credit: 1.0
Grades: 11-12
Prerequisite: Successful completion of Level IV
Expenses: It is highly recommended that students purchase a workbook for this course.
AP Exam: Students enrolled in the course are expected to take the National AP Exam in May.  (Approximately $93).

Level V classes offer the students a weighted credit. Students continue building their fluency in the language through oral, written, listening and reading practice.  These classes are conducted entirely in the target language (Spanish, French or Chinese) with both students and teachers communicating only in the target language. Students in Level V classes prepare to take the Language Advanced Placement tests which are given in May. Advanced Placement courses allow students to take the challenge of college-level courses while in the familiar surroundings of their high school.  AP courses develop advanced reading, writing, and thinking skills that benefit students in their post-secondary pursuits.  These courses require work outside the classroom, during Summer and breaks.  Students should consider their academic, social, work, and extra-curricular activities before undertaking the commitment of an Advanced Placement course.  Students will not be allowed to drop an AP course after they have signed up and courses are scheduled. This is a one-year course; students may not drop at semester. 

Note: AP Literature and AP Language can be taken concurrently with instructor approval.

Assessment at the end of Level V parallel to the AP test:

  • Speaking: The students demonstrate the ability to describe, paraphrase, express felling and opinions, give information and ask and answer questions using diverse grammatical structures and vocabulary.
  • Writing: The student composes compositions of 200-250 words on a variety of concrete and abstract topics using diverse vocabulary and correct syntax.
  • Reading: The student relates and responds to the main idea and some supporting detail of selected works written by native authors for native readers.
  • Listening: The student demonstrates an understanding of native speakers from selected listening sources such as speakers, authentic videos, films, television, and recorded conversations by responding appropriately.
  • Culture: The student demonstrates cultural empathy through appropriate behavior. The student demonstrates knowledge of aspects of the civilization of the target language (French or Spanish) such as history, fine arts, music or geography.

 International Baccalaureate: Group 2: Language B


IB Spanish ab initio SL I     95601S1 and 95601S2 (Jr. year)
This course fulfills the Group 2 requirements for the IB Diploma Programme.

IB Spanish ab initio SL II    95602S1 and 95602S2 (Sr. year)


Credit: 2.0
Grades: 11 and 12

ONLY AVAILABLE TO FULL DIPLOMA JUNIORS FOR SL1 AND SENIORS FOR SL 2.

Prerequisites: Student must be enrolled in the IB Diploma Programme.  No previous Spanish experience.

 Course description:

  • A two-year course sequence at the Standard Level only.
  • A world language course for students with little or no previous experience in the target language.
  • Provides an opportunity for students to further their linguistic skills by taking up a second foreign language, or for students to learn a foreign language for the first time.
  • Concentrates on the acquisition of language necessary for practical communication in a variety of everyday situations.
  • Develops the four primary skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing.
  • Enables students to acquire a basic awareness of the culture(s) related to the language through the study of a core-syllabus and a language-specific syllabus.

IB Spanish V SL – 95662S1 and 95662S2

This course fulfills the Group 2 requirements for the IB Diploma Programme and is open to IB Course students on an availability basis. Submission of the Course Student Commitment Form to the IB office, room C120, is required at the beginning of the course.

Credit: 1.0
Grades: 11 or 12

Prerequisites: Successful completion of Spanish IV or teacher recommendation

 Course Description:

  • The principal aim is to enable students to use Spanish in a range of contexts.
  • Promotes an awareness, and sensitivity to the culture(s) related to the language studied.
  • Prepares students to use the language appropriately in a range of situations and contexts and for a variety of purposes.
  • Focuses on language acquisition and development in the four primary language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing.
  • Language skills are developed through the study and use of a range of written and spoken material, which extends from everyday oral exchanges to literary texts related to the culture(s) concerned.

IB French V SL – 95441S1 and 95441S2

This course fulfills the Group 2 requirements for the IB Diploma Programme and is open to IB Course students on an availability basis. Submission of the Course Student Commitment Form to the IB office, room C120, is required at the beginning of the course.

Credit: 1.0
Grades: 11 or 12

Prerequisites: Successful completion of French IV or teacher recommendation

 Course Description:

  • The principal aim is to enable students to use French in a range of contexts.
  • Promotes an awareness, and sensitivity to the culture(s) related to the language studied.
  • Prepares students to use the language appropriately in a range of situations and contexts and for a variety of purposes.
  • Focuses on language acquisition and development in the four primary language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing.
  • Language skills are developed through the study and use of a range of written and spoken material, which extends from everyday oral exchanges to literary texts related to the culture(s) concerned.

IB Chinese V SL – 95738S1 and 95738S2

This course fulfills the Group 2 requirements for the IB Diploma Programme and is open to IB Course students on an availability basis. Submission of the Course Student Commitment Form to the IB office, room C120, is required at the beginning of the course.

Credit: 1.0
Grades: 11 or 12

Prerequisites: Successful completion of Chinese IV or teacher recommendation

 Course Description:

  • The principal aim is to enable students to use Chinese in a range of contexts.
  • Promotes an awareness, and sensitivity to the culture(s) related to the language studied.
  • Prepares students to use the language appropriately in a range of situations and contexts and for a variety of purposes.
  • Focuses on language acquisition and development in the four primary language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing.
  • Language skills are developed through the study and use of a range of written and spoken material, which extends from everyday oral exchanges to literary texts related to the culture(s) concerned.