Announcements

President Obama Greets Students From Powell

posted Mar 13, 2011, 8:23 AM by mia Thornton ‎(DCPS)‎

President Barack Obama, greets students from Powell Elementary in Washington, DC., following a ceremony to honor the 2009-2010 NHL Stanley Cup Champion Chicago Blackhawks in the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, Friday, March, 11, 2011. The students where on hand to participate in a first lady event with members of the Chicago Blackhawks and Washington Capitals hockey teams. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)
 
 

Student Health Form - LHC Powell Campus

posted Feb 2, 2011, 10:55 AM by mia Thornton ‎(DCPS)‎   [ updated Feb 2, 2011, 11:20 AM ]

  SCHOOL HEALTH PROFILE FORM
  View/Download Form

US Department of Educationt Open Exhibit of Artworks

posted Feb 2, 2011, 10:51 AM by mia Thornton ‎(DCPS)‎   [ updated Feb 9, 2011, 11:10 AM ]

U.S. Department of Education to to Open Exhibit of Art

Works from D.C. Public Schools Students

Contact:  
Elaine Quesinberry , (202) 401-1576, press@ed.gov


Event Date 1: January 26, 2011 11:00 am - 12:00 pm


U.S. Department of Education Assistant Deputy Secretary Jim Shelton will open an exhibit of D.C. Public Schools student art works on Jan. 26 at 11 a.m. with remarks and a ribbon cutting ceremony in the Department’s Barnard Auditorium. The exhibit will display artworks created by K–6th-grade students from 10 D.C. public schools.

The program will open with a musical welcome from Smothers Elementary School Cougar Choir and Guitar Ensemble. Speakers will include D. C. Public Schools Chief of Family and Public Engagement Peggy O’Brien and Hugh Browne Education Campus art teacher Patricia Laney. Students from Powell Elementary School and Bruce-Monroe Elementary School at Park View will showcase dance and choral Spanish poetry. Duke Ellington School of the Arts will share its students’ pre-professional talents in a work by William Grant Still and in a musical selection from Dreamgirls.

“The arts are a core academic subject and part of a complete education for all students,” said U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan. “Arts education is essential to stimulating the creativity and innovation that will prove critical to young Americans competing in a global economy.”

The Department’s Student Art Exhibit Program, now in its seventh year, features visual art created by students in U.S. and international schools, and provides students and teachers an opportunity to display creative work from the classroom and promote art as a tool for education and learning for all.

To attend the opening, visit the exhibit and receive more information about the Department’s Student Art Exhibit Program, contact Jackye Zimmermann at 202-401-0762 or at Jacquelyn.Zimmermann@ed.gov.


Event 1
Who : Jim Shelton, assistant deputy secretary, Office of Innovation and Improvement, U.S. Department of Education
Peggy O’Brien, chief of Family and Public Engagement D.C. Public Schools
Patricia Laney, art teacher, Hugh Browne Education Campus
What : Ribbon cutting ceremony for D.C. Public Schools art exhibit opening
When : 11 a.m. EST Jan. 26, 2011
Where : U.S. Department of Education
Barnard Auditorium
400 Maryland Ave., S.W.
Washington, D.C.

DCPS Wellness Policy

posted Dec 6, 2010, 9:47 AM by mia Thornton ‎(DCPS)‎   [ updated Dec 6, 2010, 10:00 AM ]


Local Wellness Policy
District of Columbia Board of Education
for
District of Columbia Public Schools
May 2006

Background
The U.S. Congress established a requirement in the Child Nutrition and Women, Infants
and Children (WIC) Reauthorization Act of 2004, that all school districts with a federally
funded school meal program draft a local school wellness policy by the start of the 2006-
2007
school year.
The law requires that these policies must, at a minimum, (1) include goals for nutrition
education, physical activity, and other school-based activities that promote student wellness, (2)
establish nutrition guidelines for all foods available on each school campus during the school day
with the objectives of promoting student health and reducing childhood obesity, (3) provide
assurance that those guidelines for reimbursable school meals shall not be less restrictive than
regulations and guidance applicable to school meals issued by the Secretary of Agriculture, (4)
establish a plan for measuring the implementation of the local wellness policy, including
designation of one or more persons with operational responsibility for ensuring that the schools
meet the wellness policy; and (5) involve parents, students, and representatives of the school
food authority, school board, school administrators, and the public, in the development of the
school wellness policy.
The District of Columbia Board of Education will use the above requirements as a baseline and
expand the policy to cover additional student wellness areas. The wellness policy will cover the
following:
1. Include goals for nutrition education, physical activity, and other school-based activities that
promote student wellness.
2. Establish nutrition guidelines for all foods available on campus during the school day with the
objectives of promoting student health and reducing childhood obesity.
3. Include safeguards to ensure access for all children to healthy foods and to fight hunger and
nutrient deficiencies.
4. Provide assurance that those guidelines for reimbursable school meals shall not be less
restrictive than regulations and guidance issued by the Secretary of Agriculture.
5. Promote student wellness by implementing Coordinated School Health Program components.
6. Establish a plan for measuring the impact and implementation of the local wellness policy,
including designation of one or more persons with operational responsibility for ensuring that
the schools meet the wellness policy.
7. Involve parents, students, and representatives of the school food authority, school board,
school administrators, and the public, in development of the local Wellness Policy.
Vision/Statement of Responsibility
The District of Columbia Board of Education recognizes that nutrition education, food
served in schools, and physical activity each affect student wellness. The Board also recognizes
the important connection between a healthy diet and a student’s ability to learn effectively and
achieve high standards in school.
The Board of Education recognizes that it is the District’s role, as part of the larger
community, to model and actively practice, through policies and procedures, the promotion of
family health, physical activity, and good nutrition.
The Board of Education further recognizes that the sharing and enjoyment of food and
participation in physical activities are fundamental experiences for all District residents and are
primary ways to nurture and celebrate our cultural diversity. These fundamental human
experiences are vital bridges for building friendships, forming inter-generational bonds, and
strengthening communities.
The Board of Education recognizes the research and studies that show the direct link
between nutritional intake and academic performance, as well as between physical activity and
academic achievement.
Preamble
Whereas, a healthy diet increases a student’s ability to learn effectively and achieve high
standards in school;
Whereas, each day, students and their parents trust that the foods offered at school are nutritious
and safe, and that the Board of Education is responsible for ensuring the safety of foods provided
at school;
Whereas, nationally, obesity rates have tripled in children and tripled in adolescents over the last
two decades, and physical inactivity and excessive calorie intake are the predominant causes of
obesity;
Whereas, heart disease, cancer, stroke, and diabetes are responsible for two-thirds of deaths in
the United States, and major risk factors for those diseases, including unhealthy eating habits,
physical inactivity, and obesity, often are established in childhood;
Whereas, in the District of Columbia 14 percent of high school students are overweight and 17
percent are at risk for becoming overweight;
Whereas, in the District of Columbia 79 percent of high school students eat fewer than five
servings of fruits and vegetables per day;
Whereas, in the District of Columbia 56 percent of high school students do not participate in
sufficient vigorous physical activity and 81 percent of high school students do not attend daily
physical education classes;
Whereas, community participation is essential to the development and implementation of
successful school wellness policies;
Thus, the Board of Education is committed to providing school environments that promote and
protect children’s health, well-being and ability to learn by supporting healthy eating and
physical activity. Therefore, it is the policy of the Board of Education that:
1. All students in grades Pre K-12 will have opportunities, support, and encouragement to
be physically active on a regular basis.
2. Foods and beverages sold or served at school will meet the nutrition recommendations of
the U.S. Dietary Guidelines for Americans.
3. The Board of Education will ensure that no student in District of Columbia Schools goes
hungry during the school day.
4. The Board of Education will engage students, parents, teachers, food service
professionals, health professionals, and other interested community members in
developing, implementing, monitoring, and reviewing district-wide nutrition and physical
activity policies.
5. Qualified child nutrition professionals will provide students with access to a variety of
affordable, nutritious, and appealing foods that meet the health and nutrition needs of
students; will accommodate the religious, ethnic, and cultural diversity of the student
body in meal planning; and will provide clean, safe, and pleasant settings and adequate
time for students to eat.
6. To the maximum extent practicable, all schools in our district will participate in available
federal school meal programs (including the School Breakfast Program, National School
7. Lunch Program [including after-school snacks], Summer Food Service Program, Fruit
8. and Vegetable Snack Program, and Child and Adult Care Food Program [including
9. suppers, if applicable]).
10. Schools will provide nutrition education and physical education to foster lifelong habits
of healthy eating and physical activity, and will establish linkages between health
education and school meal programs, and with related community services.
Section 1: Ensuring Quality Nutrition Education, Health Education and Physical
Education.
The District of Columbia Board of Education aims to provide age-appropriate and
culturally sensitive instruction in nutrition, health and physical education that help
students develop the knowledge, attitudes, and skills to enjoy healthy eating habits and a
physically active lifestyle.
Health and Nutrition Education
All schools (and providers of nutrition education in schools, such as Team Nutrition
hosted by Houston and Associates, Children’s National Medical Center, and the
Department of Health Food Stamp Nutrition Education Program) will provide nutrition
education that:
• is offered at each grade level, K-8, as part of a sequential, comprehensive,
standards-based program designed to provide students with the knowledge
and skills necessary to promote and protect their health;
• is required as part of health education for the Carnegie Unit (one half of a
semester) for senior high school students.
• Integrated into other content areas such as math, science, language arts,
social sciences, and elective subjects. Resources will be disseminated to
teachers and other staff;
• includes enjoyable, developmentally-appropriate, culturally-relevant,
participatory activities, such as contests, promotions, taste testing, farm
visits, and school gardens;
• promotes fruits, vegetables, whole grain products, low-fat and fat-free
dairy products, healthy food preparation methods, and health-enhancing
nutrition practices;
• emphasizes caloric balance between food intake and energy expenditure
(physical activity/exercise);
• links with school meal programs, other school foods, and nutrition-related
community services;
• teaches media literacy with an emphasis on food marketing; and
• includes training for teachers, parents and community partners.
Physical Activity
The District of Columbia Board of Education acknowledges the positive benefits of physical
activity for student health and academic achievement. Recognizing that physical education is a
crucial and integral part of a child’s education, the district will provide opportunities to ensure
that students engage in healthful levels of vigorous physical activity to promote and develop the
student’s physical, mental, emotional, and social well-being. Besides promoting high levels of
personal achievement and a positive self-image, physical education activities should teach
students how to cooperate in the achievement of common goals.
The components of the district’s physical education program shall include a variety of
kinesthetic activities, including team, individual, and cooperative sports and physical activities,
as well as aesthetic movement forms, such as dance, yoga or the martial arts.
Students shall be given opportunities for physical activity through a range of before-and/or after
school programs including, but not limited to, intramurals, interscholastic athletics, and physical
activity clubs. The Board of Education will ensure that:
• Recess time will be required daily, at least 20 minutes;
• Teachers and other school and community personnel will not use physical activity
(e.g., running laps, pushups) or withhold opportunities for physical activity (e.g.,
recess, physical education) as punishment;
• Health and physical education is required for K-8 students, 45 minutes, 2 days per
week; and the District will work toward the national standard of 3 days per week.
• Physical Education is required for high school students for a semester and a half
as required as part of the Carnegie Unit for graduation;
• Physical education teachers shall develop and implement a curriculum that
connects and demonstrates the interrelationship between physical activity, good
nutrition, and health;
• The Board of Education shall enhance the quality of physical education curricula
and increase training of physical education teachers through site-based and
district-wide staff development;
• An appropriate alternative activity to physical education shall be provided for
students with a physical disability that may restrict excessive physical exertion;
• Physical education staff shall appropriately limit the amount or type of physical
exercise required of students during air pollution episodes, inclement weather
conditions.
• Integrated into other content areas such as math, science, language arts,
social sciences, and elective subjects. Resources will be disseminated to
teachers and other staff;
Additional programs that the Board of Education may utilize to supplement resources may be:
Physical Energizers, HOPSPORTS, Inc., Action for Healthy Kids – National Football League
(AFHK-NFL) Recharge Program; Passport to Play; Balance First; USTA/WTA Tennis
Association; USFSA Ice Skating/Ft. Dupont; Bicycle Association; and Kaleidoscope.
Section 2: Establishing Nutritional Guidelines for All Foods Served and Sold on Campus
During the School Day.
A component of the educational mission of the D.C. Board of Education is teaching students to
establish and maintain life-long healthy eating habits. This mission shall be accomplished, in
part, through selling and serving healthful food in the schools. The Board of Education will
ensure that:
Free and Reduced-Price Meals
• All qualified students will become eligible for free lunch, through frequent
checking and coordination with the Department of Human Service Income
Maintenance Administration and agencies serving homeless and run-a-way youth;
• Maximum participation in the school meal program will be achieved by
developing a coordinated, comprehensive outreach and promotion plan, and by
putting systems in place that ensure the elimination of the stigma of accepting
“free” lunch (such as an electronic usage system);
• Schools will provide students with at least 20 minutes to eat after sitting down for
breakfast and 30-45 minutes after sitting down for lunch;
Breakfast
• Schools will continue to operate a Universal “Free for All” School Breakfast
Program in the cafeteria;
• The Division of Food and Nutrition Services will encourage Breakfast in the
Classroom programs for principals interested;
• Schools will market the Universal “Free for All” School Breakfast program
through take home flyers, school and district newsletters, home mailings, etc.
Nutritional Quality of School Meals
• The nutritional value of the food served will improve upon USDA standards
through provision of nutritious, fresh, tasty food that reflects community and
cultural diversity;
• All milk sold and served through school meals will be either low-fat (1%) or fat free
milk 1or nutritionally-equivalent non-dairy alternatives (to be defined by USDA);
• The District will move toward more whole grains
In-School and After School Snacks
Snacks served during the school day or in after-school care or enrichment programs will make a
positive contribution to children’s diets and health, with an emphasis on serving fruits and
vegetables as the primary snacks and water as the primary beverage. Schools will assess if and
when to offer snacks based on timing of school meals, children’s nutritional needs, children’s
ages, and other considerations. The district will disseminate a list of healthful snack items to
teachers, after-school program personnel, and parents.
The Board of Education will provide snacks through after-school programs and will apply for
reimbursements through the National School Lunch Program operated by the State Education
Office.
D.C. Free Summer Meals Program
The Board of Education will sponsor the D.C. Free Summer meals Program operated by the
State Education Office for at least six weeks between the last day of the academic school year
and the first day of the following school year, and preferably throughout the entire summer
vacation for D.C. Public Schools and any interested community-based organization.
School Stores
There will be no food sold or served in school stores.
1 As recommended by the Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2005.
Foods and Beverages Sold Individually in Vending Machines, Snacks, and Fundraisers
• Elementary schools shall not have vending machines or school stores accessible
by students;
• Vending machines, a la carte, fundraisers, and school stores shall only offer
approved items, as cited by the DCPS/D.C. Action for Healthy Kids Healthy
Vending Policy outlined below;
• Draft food and beverage vending contracts shall be made available to the public
for inspection and comments before being signed by the Board of Education and
neither the Board of Education nor individual schools may sign exclusive
contracts, or contracts with confidential clauses, with soft drink, fast food, or
snack food companies.
• All beverages and snacks authorized for sale in vending machines and fundraisers
available to students shall meet the nutritional standards listed below.
(1) The following beverages may be sold at schools:
(A) Fruit-based drinks that contain 100 percent fruit juice and that do not contain
additional caloric sweeteners;
(B) Water or seltzer water; and
(C) Low-fat or fat-free milk, including, but not limited to, chocolate milk, soy
milk, rice milk, and other similar dairy or nondairy calcium-fortified milks.
(2) The following beverages shall not be provided or sold:
(A) Soft drinks, sports drinks, punches, and iced teas;
(B) Fruit-based drinks that contain less than 100 percent real fruit juice or that
contain additional caloric sweeteners; and
(C) Drinks containing caffeine, excluding low-fat or fat-free chocolate milk.
(3) All snacks, sweets, or side dishes sold or served on the school site outside of the
federal school meal program shall meet all of the following standards:
(A) Have 35 percent or less of its total calories from fat;
(B) Have 10 percent or less of its total calories from saturated plus trans fat;
(C) Have 35 percent or less of its weight from sugars, excluding sugars occurring
naturally in fruits, vegetables, and dairy ingredients; and
(D) Have no more than 230 mg of sodium per serving for chips, cereals, crackers,
French fries, baked goods, and other snack items; contain no more than 480 mg of
sodium per serving for pastas, meats, and soups; and will contain no more than
600 mg of sodium for pizza, sandwiches, and main dishes.
(E) Limit portion sizes of foods and beverages sold individually to those listed
below:
o One and one-quarter ounces for chips, crackers, popcorn, cereal,
trail mix, nuts, seeds, dried fruit, or jerky;
o One ounce for cookies;
o Two ounces for cereal bars, granola bars, pastries, muffins, doughnuts,
bagels, and other bakery items;
o Four fluid ounces for frozen desserts, including, but not limited to, lowfat
or fat-free ice cream;
o Eight ounces for non-frozen yogurt;
o Twelve fluid ounces for beverages, excluding water; and
Fruits and non-fried vegetables are exempt from portion-size
limits.
(4) Fruits and vegetables shall be offered for sale at any location on the school site
where foods are sold. Such items could include, but are not limited to, fresh fruits
and vegetables; 100% fruit or vegetable juice; cooked, dried, or canned fruits (canned
in fruit juice or light syrup); and cooked, dried, or canned vegetables (that meet the
above fat and sodium guidelines).2
Foods and Beverages Sold in A La Carte Lines
• All beverages and snacks authorized for sale in a la carte lines available to
students shall meet the nutritional standards listed below.
(1) The following beverages may be sold a la carte:
(A) Fruit-based drinks that contain 100 percent fruit juice and that do not contain
additional caloric sweeteners;
(B) Water or seltzer water; and
(C) Low-fat or fat-free milk, including, but not limited to, chocolate milk, soy
milk, rice milk, and other similar dairy or nondairy calcium-fortified milks.
(2) The following beverages shall not be provided or sold:
(A) Soft drinks, sports drinks, punches, and iced teas; and
(B) Fruit-based drinks that contain less than 100 percent real fruit juice or that
contain additional caloric sweeteners; and
(C) Whole or reduced-fat milk, including as milk served with hot beverages.
(3) All snacks, sweets, or side dishes sold or served a la carte shall meet all of the
following standards:
(A) Have 35 percent or less of its total calories from fat;
(B) Have 10 percent or less of its total calories from saturated plus trans fat;
(C) Have 35 percent or less of its weight from sugars, excluding sugars occurring
naturally in fruits, vegetables, and dairy ingredients; and
(D) Shall work toward having no more 600 mg of sodium for a la carte items.
(E) Limit portion sizes of foods and beverages sold through a la carte to those
listed below:
o One and one-quarter ounces for chips, crackers, popcorn, cereal,
trail mix, nuts, seeds, dried fruit, or jerky;
o One ounce for cookies;
o Two ounces for cereal bars, granola bars, pastries, muffins, doughnuts,
bagels, and other bakery items;
o Four fluid ounces for frozen desserts, including, but not limited to, low-fat
or fat-free ice cream;
o Eight ounces for non-frozen yogurt;
2 Schools that have vending machines are encouraged to include refrigerated snack vending machines,
which can accommodate fruits, vegetables, yogurts, and other perishable items.
o Twelve fluid ounces for beverages, excluding water; and
The portion size of a la carte entrees and side dishes, including potatoes, will not be greater than
the size of comparable portions offered as part of school meals. Fruits and non-fried vegetables
are exempt from portion-size limits.
Food Marketing in Schools
School-based marketing will be consistent with nutrition education and health promotion. As
such, schools will limit food and beverage marketing to the promotion of foods and beverages
that meet the nutrition standards for meals or for foods and beverages sold individually (above).33
School-based marketing of brands promoting predominantly low-nutrition foods and beverages4
is prohibited. The promotion of healthy foods, including fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and
low-fat dairy products is encouraged.
Examples of marketing techniques include the following: logos and brand names on/in vending
machines, books or curricula, textbook covers, school supplies, scoreboards, school structures,
and sports equipment; educational incentive programs that provide food as a reward; programs
that provide schools with supplies when families buy low-nutrition food products; in-school
television, such as Channel One; free samples or coupons; and food sales through fundraising
activities.
Marketing activities that promote healthful behaviors (and are therefore allowable)
include: vending machine covers promoting water; pricing structures that promote healthy
options in a la carte lines or vending machines; sales of fruit for fundraisers; and coupons for
discount gym memberships.4
Rewards
Schools, community-based organizations and other partners will not use foods or beverages,
especially those that do not meet the nutrition standards for foods and beverages sold
individually (above), as rewards for academic performance or good behavior, 5
and will not
withhold food or beverages (including food served through school meals) as a punishment.
Celebrations
Schools should limit celebrations that involve food during the school day to no more than one
party per class per month. Each party should include no more than one food or beverage that
does not meet nutrition standards for foods and beverages sold individually (above). The district
will disseminate a list of healthy party ideas to parents and teachers.
3 Advertising of low-nutrition foods and beverages is permitted in supplementary classroom and library
materials, such as newspapers, magazines, the Internet, and similar media, when such materials are
used in a class lesson or activity, or as a research tool.
4 Schools should not permit general brand marketing for food brands under which more than half of the
foods or beverages do not meet the nutrition standards for foods sold individually or the meals are not
consistent with school meal nutrition standards.
5 Unless this practice is allowed by a student’s individual education plan (IEP).
Section 3: Assure that guidelines for school meals are not less restrictive than those set at
the federal level by the Secretary of Agriculture.
The Director of Food and Nutrition Services will review this policy and ensure that the policies
are not less restrictive than those set by the Secretary of Agriculture or state law.
Section 4: Establish a plan for measuring the impact and implementation of the local
wellness policy.
The D.C. Board of Education shall develop a steering committee for the development and
monitoring of the wellness policy; and this committee shall also be responsible for evaluation of
the policy annually.
The State Education Office will also monitor the status of Local Wellness Policies while
conducting reviews and site visits for LEAs.
Section 5: Community Involvement
The D.C. Board of Education may develop a plan for community involvement or use the input
and feedback from the D.C. Action for Healthy Kids Parent and Community Forums conducted
during the winter and early spring of 2006.
##
Complimentary technical assistance for this policy was provided by District of Columbia Action
for Healthy Kids. For additional information, please call Kimberly Perry at 202-986-2200 ext.
3023 or Joy Johanson at 202-332-9110 ext. 351.
Sources:
Model Language used from:
1. The Center for Ecoliteracy in collaboration with Slow Food USA and Chez Panisse
Foundation
2. National Alliance for Nutrition and Activity
3. District of Columbia Action for Healthy Kids
a. 2005 Work plan
b. Healthy Vending Policy
4. Food Research and Action Center

posted Dec 6, 2010, 9:46 AM by mia Thornton ‎(DCPS)‎

posted Dec 6, 2010, 9:14 AM by mia Thornton ‎(DCPS)‎

 
 

Powell Nominated for an Award!

posted Mar 30, 2010, 12:43 PM by Stephanie Black ‎(ES)‎   [ updated Jun 7, 2010, 5:30 PM ]

Powell is currently a finalist for the Rising Star Award with Fight for Children!  Read more about the Fight For Children organization at their website: http://www.fightforchildren.org/

Powell in the News!

posted Mar 21, 2010, 2:21 PM by Stephanie Black ‎(ES)‎

Tuesday Tours!

posted Feb 1, 2010, 3:09 PM by Stephanie Black ‎(ES)‎

Powell wants you to see our excellence firsthand! If you are interested in taking a tour of the Powell campus during school hours, Powell currently one hour offers tours from 8:30 A.M. to 2:30 P.M. every Tuesday.  If you wish to get a tour after school hours, please call (202) 671-6270 to arrange an appointment.

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