About MIXED

MIXED (Migration to Intermediate XML for Electronic Data) is a service that can convert files with tabular data (spreadsheets and databases) to supplier independent XML for long term preservation. This is the so called Standard Data Format for Preservation (SDFP). MIXED does not store the converted files, but returns them to you for download and keep 'for ever'. A SDFP file can also be converted back by MIXED to the original supplier dependent format, or to formats of other suppliers, or - in the future - to not yet existing formats.

Each migration is delivered by a plugin. The MIXED framework is easily extendable with new plugins and we wholeheartedly invite other parties to enhance this service by creating new plugins.

The present migration service is offered by DANS at this website. Please go there to upload and convert your files!!! If the system is not too busy, your files will be converted on the fly and you can download the result right away.

At present MIXED can handle these file formats: 
  • Data Perfect (only input)
  • Access 2000 and 2002
  • dBase III and IV
  • Excel 2003
For documentation concerning the use of this service, see the documentation page. There are limitations in this service. Please consider these carefully, especially when you plan to make use of this service on a larger scale. A very evident limitation is that only data content is converted, no layout or formulas are converted.

Background

MIXED is the result of a project with the same name carried out at DANS (Data Archiving and Networked Services) during 2007-2010. The proceedings of that project are still accessible to insiders at the archived project website.The MIXED project has been funded by the Dutch Ministry for Science, Culture and Education (OCW), in the PRIMA programme and by DANS.


The idea behind MIXED is that sooner of later all the file formats become obsolete. Best is to convert the data to a well documented, supplier independent format as soon as possible. For more background on why this service is important for digital preservation, see the background page.
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