Resources specific to: How did you come to be here?

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Creating Cultural Self Awareness


I. How Did You Come To Be Here? An ancestral/historical and geographical/migrational bio (adapted from Sara Thomsen, commonplacemusic@hotmail.com by DivCom)
  •   How did you come to be here [at UMD] or in the Duluth/Superior area?          
  •   How did you come to be here in this country?
            If you were born here, how did your parents, grandparents or ancestors come to be here
            If they came here from another country, from where, when, how, and why did they come?
            If they chose to come, what did their journey to get here look like (if you don’t know stories from your own family, what can you discover through the stories                     of others that were in similar experiences?)
            If they were forced to come here, what did their journey to get here look like (if you don’t know stories from your own family, what can you discover through                     the stories of others that were in similar experiences?)
            If some or all of your ancestors were indigenous to this country, where did they live and in what ways were they impacted by immigration and colonization? If                 they lived in different areas at different times, when, how, and why did they move?
            In what ways did your forebears lives impact and shape the lives of their descendants?
  • In what ways do your stories and histories impact your present life and future journey?
  • Don't stop here...what are the stories of the people around you? Continue the conversation...

II. To take the course introductions to another level and apply to the Pastures of Plenty theme: How did you come to be here?   (Paula Pedersen, Department of Psychology ppederse@d.umn.edu):                                                                                                                                                                           
Test your knowledge of  U.S. immigration history. http://news.change.org/stories/test-your-knowledge-of-immigration-history
  • Share your own ethnic history and, if you have one, immigration/migration story of your family of origin.  When, from where, did your family first immigrate to the US (IF they did).  Find out the story/stories from family members. What do you know about your ethnic breakdown?

    Using the handout "A nation of immigrants" (attached as resource)  and/or the "race" timeline http://www.pbs.org/race/003_RaceTimeline/003_00-home.htm and other web resources, identify what was happening in history at the time of your own family's immigration/migration story.  Why did people immigrate to/migrate within, the U.S. during this time in history? If your heritage includes indigenous peoples, include the story of their own migration due to the impact of immigration.  Similarly, an African American ancestry might have more of a migration story due to forced relocation through slavery. African American Genealogy research http://video.pbs.org/video/1481834844/

    If you are an international student, find the historical immigration to the U.S. of people from your home country to the U.S.  What brought them to the U.S.? If you are adopted, you can use either your birth family heritage (if you know it) or your adoptive family heritage.


III. Additional resources to facilitate this process of cultural self awareness:

Enhancing Self-Awareness: A Practical Strategy to Train Culturally Responsive Social Work Students
http://journals.iupui.edu/index.php/advancesinsocialwork/article/viewFile/482/1787
Appendix A includes the outline of the ethnic roots assignment
Text: McLemore, S., Romo, H., & Baker, S. (2001). Racial and ethnic relations in
America (6th ed.). Boston: Allyn & Bacon.

Culture, tradition and appropriation In Witnessing Whiteness
http://www.witnessingwhiteness.com/
Resources on cultural self awareness for white people in chapter 1, workshop 1.2

Teaching for Diversity and Social Justice, Second Edition, Routledge, 2007
Edited by Maurianne Adams, Lee Anne Bell and Pat Griffin
http://www.routledge.com/books/details/9780415952002/
* The files below are from Ch. 7; Racism, Immigration, and Globalization Curriculum Design
** See the last pdf for additional video and print resources on the topic

The New Americans
The New Americans civic engagement and educational outreach campaign uses the groundbreaking PBS series to engage people in constructive conversations at community forums, online and in classrooms—key places where people turn to talk about immigration and what it means to be an "American."
http://www.pbs.org/independentlens/newamericans/index.html

Interviews with Today's Immigrants (Library of Congress)
http://www.loc.gov/teachers/classroommaterials/presentationsandactivities/presentations/immigration/interv/toc.php


Myths about Immigration
Examples and Ideas across the Curriculum

ART:



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Paula Pedersen,
Aug 17, 2011, 9:04 AM
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Paula Pedersen,
Aug 17, 2011, 9:04 AM
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Paula Pedersen,
Aug 17, 2011, 9:05 AM
Ċ
Paula Pedersen,
Aug 17, 2011, 9:05 AM
Ċ
Paula Pedersen,
Aug 17, 2011, 9:06 AM
Ċ
Paula Pedersen,
Aug 17, 2011, 9:06 AM
Ċ
Paula Pedersen,
Aug 17, 2011, 9:06 AM
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Paula Pedersen,
Aug 17, 2011, 9:09 AM
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Paula Pedersen,
Aug 17, 2011, 9:09 AM
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Paula Pedersen,
Aug 16, 2011, 6:53 PM
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Paula Pedersen,
Aug 16, 2011, 6:54 PM
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