Aspergers Syndrome

Aspergers Syndrome

    The most distinguishing symptom of AS is a child’s obsessive interest in a single object or topic to the exclusion of any other.  Some children with AS have become experts on vacuum cleaners, makes and models of cars, even objects as odd as deep fat fryers.  Children with AS want to know everything about their topic of interest and their conversations with others will be about little else.
    Children with AS will gather enormous amounts of factual information about their favorite subject and will talk incessantly about it, but the conversation may seem like a random collection of facts or statistics, with no point or conclusion.  
    Their expertise, high level of vocabulary, and formal speech patterns make them seem like little professors.  They may have a formal style of speaking that is advanced for his or her age. For example, the child may use the word "beckon" instead of "call" or the word "return" instead of "come back."
    Their speech may be marked by a lack of rhythm, an odd inflection, or a monotone pitch.  Children with AS often lack the ability to modulate the volume of their voice to match their surroundings.  For example, they will have to be reminded to talk softly every time they enter a library or a movie theatre.  They may be unable to recognize subtle differences in speech tone, pitch, and accent that alter the meaning of others’ speech.  Thus, your child may not understand a joke or may take a sarcastic comment literally.  Likewise, his or her speech may be flat and difficult to understand because it lacks tone, pitch, and accent.
    Unlike the severe withdrawal from the rest of the world that is characteristic of autism, children with AS are isolated because of their poor social skills and narrow interests.  In fact, they may approach other people, but make normal conversation impossible by inappropriate or eccentric behavior, or by wanting only to talk about their singular interest.  They may not pick up on social cues and may lack inborn social skills, such as being able to read others' body language, start or maintain a conversation, and take turns talking.  They may avoid eye contact or stare at others.
    Children with AS usually have a history of developmental delays in motor skills such as pedaling a bike, catching a ball, or climbing outdoor play equipment.   They are often awkward and poorly coordinated with a walk that can appear either stilted or bouncy.  Handwriting is often poor.  They may have heightened sensitivity and become overstimulated by loud noises, lights, or strong tastes or textures.  These symptoms may co-exist with sensory integration dysfunction. 
    Many children with AS are highly active in early childhood, and then develop anxiety or depression in young adulthood.  Other conditions that often co-exist with AS are ADHD, tic disorders (such as Tourette syndrome), depression, anxiety disorders, and OCD.   
    Dealing with negative behaviors in children with Aspergers is difficult, mainly because they may fail to respond to traditional discipline methods, are often unable to process the consequences of their behavior and actions, and have difficulty understanding social expectations.  Many negative behaviors exhibited by children with AS are a direct result of the condition.  Parents, teachers, and professionals must consider this when developing behavior treatments.

When teaching students with AS, please remember that:

  • Those with Aspergers may exhibit a lack of common sense.
  • Odd behaviors are not reflective of defiance and are not meant to irritate or annoy.
  • Aspergers children may be unable to resist giving in to their obsessions and compulsions, and this is not a sign of disobedience.
  • Due to trouble handling changes in routine, a simple variation in schedules may be enough to cause a meltdown.
  • Because Aspergers children have difficulty interpreting social cues and tend to be egocentric, they cannot fully appreciate what impact their behaviors have on others.
  • They can be manipulative just like any other child or adult.
  • They may seem to lack empathy toward others.
References:
http://www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/asperger/detail_asperger.htm#115353080

http://www.webmd.com/brain/autism/tc/aspergers-syndrome-symptoms
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