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Lands & Resources


Our Staff

Councillor Lionel Sparvier
 Portfolio Holder
Councillor Bonnie Lavallee
 Co-Chair
Loretta Delorme
 Manager, Lands and Resources
Vacant   
 Leasing Officer
Holly Delorme     
Administrative Assistant

Current Land Management Processes for leasing

Cowessess First Nation Lands

Cowessess First Nation signed the Treaty Land Entitlement Agreement with the Province of Saskatchewan and the Government of Canada in March of 1996.  In pursuant to the terms of this agreement, Cowessess First Nation began negotiating leases on reserve status land to local producers on a cost per acre basis for crop lands.

In 2006 Cowessess signed into the Reserve Land and Environment Management (RLEMP), the Lands & Resources Department manage Treaty Land Entitlement lands that have attained Reserve Status.

The process is as follows:

  • "Offer to Lease" application is filled out by the pending Lessee and submitted to Lands and Resources.  The offer is for short term and no longer than 3 years.
  • A "permit" is prepared.
  • "Offer to Lease" and the "Permit" application is presented to Chief and Council for approval and signatures.  (3 copies are signed, one for the Lessee, one for First Nations and for INAC).
  • One copy of the signed Permit goes to INAC for registration of permit, one remains in the Lands Department and the Lessee gets one copy.

Cheques received from Lessee's for the spring and fall payments are made out to the Receiver General of Canada and sent to Ottawa and deposited into the Revenue Trust Account (RTA).

Chief and Council through Band Council Resolution (BCR) process, request funds from the RTA to allocate.

Original Reserve Land (the existing reserve):

  • No legal process to lease out.

Pre – Reserve Land (CFN owned but not Reserve Status manged by the TLE Office)

  • Lease out short term (1 - 5 years). 
  • “offer to lease” application submitted to Trust for review and approval. 
  • Lease is drawn up and signed (2 copies) by the Lessee and the Trustees. 
  • One copy of lease remains in office for filing, and lessee receives his copy. 
  • Treaty Land Entitlement manages lands and dollars.


Here what’s happening at Lands & Resources:

Cowessess Land Use Planning

Hello Cowessess Members

Cowessess First Nation Chief & Council and the Lands & Resources Department are in the development stages of Land Use Planning.  A proposal was submitted to First Nation Market Housing Fund for funding to assist in Land Use Planning.  Cowessess was successful in getting the proposal approved and Urban System was contracted out to complete this task with assistance from Cowessess First Nation.

Urban Systems has a 35 year history of providing services to over 40 First Nation communities across Western Canada. Urban System team offers an outstanding track record of success in community planning and engineering assignments for a broad range of First Nation communities.

In closing, engaging our Membership is important to ensure effective land management decision for future generations.  Successful development of the Land Use Plan will be achieved through effective communication and public engagement, and through fostering community ownership of the process and plan.  The final products will together be a strong reflection of the community’s vision and desires for the use of Cowessess lands. The Land Use Plan will serve as a guide to future growth and development on our lands.

 

Below is some information on what Land Use Planning is, and there is also an attachment of a PowerPoint Presentation from Urban Systems on Land Use Planning.  Check it out!

 

What is Land Use Planning?

Wikipedia defines land-use planning as, “is the term used for a branch of public policy encompassing various disciplines which seek to order and regulate land use in an efficient and ethical way, thus preventing land-use conflicts.” 

Natural Resources Management and Environment Department defines land-use planning as “the systematic assessment of land and water potential, alternatives for land use and economic and social conditions in order to select and adopt the best land-use options.  Its purpose is to select and put into practice those land uses that will best meet the needs of the people while safeguarding resources for the future.  The driving force in planning is the need for change, the need for improved management or the need for a different pattern of land use dictated by changing circumstances.”

Land use planning has many definitions depending on which authority is identifying the need to plan, but essentially all capture the same concept that land use must be developed and managed through a process of establishing long term goals and meeting those goals in order to achieve what is best for the community.

Land Use Planning means managing lands and resources.  It helps each community to set goals about how it will grow and develop and work out way of reaching those goals while keeping important social, economic and environmental concerns in mind.  It balances the interests of individual property owners with the wider interests and objectives of the whole community.

Land use planning affects almost every part of life in all communities.  It is a process about how decisions are made on where houses, parks and schools will be built and how infrastructure and other essential services will be provided.

Land use planning requires engagement, commitment and capacity.  A land use plan also needs to be linked to other community initiatives which are established based on longer-term goals set by the community and for the community.

Engaging our Membership is important to ensure effective land management decisions for future generations.  Successful development of the Land Use Plan will be achieved through effective communication and public engagement, and through fostering community ownership of the process and plan. The final products will together be a strong reflection of the community’s vision and desires for the use of Cowessess First Nation reserve lands.  The Land Use Plan will serve as a guide to future growth and development on Cowessess First Nation lands.

 

What is a Land Use Plan?

A land use plan will describe a community’s policies on how lands and resources should be used. It is prepared with local community input to ensure that future planning and development will meet the immediate and long term needs of the community.  It is a document that identifies existing land uses, plans for future land uses and identifies processes to ensure a sustainable future.

It will usually start with an overall vision for the community.  It will be open to all of the membership to participate in the process of establishing a vision, to be part of data collection and development of options, to provide input on policy development to ensure the land use plan meets the needs of the community.

Some main components of the land use planning process may include;

·       Community consultation

·       Inventory and date collection

·       Preparation of a land use plan

·       Preparation of a land use policy document

·       Development of a dispute resolution mechanism

·       Development of an implementation strategy

·       Establishing an on-going review and management process

Resources used to obtain information:

http://www.fao.org/docrep/T0715E/t0715e02.htm#what%20is%20land%20use%20planning

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Land-use_planning 

land use policy process – prepared by Lands Technical Committee, Sask. Region, Sept.9/97

 If you would like more information or would like to share information you can contact me at the office toll free at 1-888-696-3121 or email at denise.pelletier@cowessessfn.com



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Dec 20, 2012, 12:14 PM
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