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Tech Tip Tuesday: Enable and configure versioning for a SharePoint list or library

posted Jun 20, 2016, 10:24 AM by Whitney Greenwell   [ updated Jun 20, 2016, 10:28 AM ]

Enable and configure versioning for a SharePoint list or library


About Versioning 
When versioning is enabled in site lists, you can track and manage information as it evolves. You can look at earlier versions and recover them, if necessary. That is very handy, for example, when people realize that earlier versions of an item might be more accurate than later ones. Some organizations retain multiple versions of items in their lists for legal reasons or audit purposes.

When you enable and configure versioning, you can retain versions each time an item it is edited. You need to decide how many versions you allow, and whether you want all site users to see all draft versions, or only be visible only to the originator and specific people in your organization. By default, versioning is turned off. To turn it on and implement your versioning decisions, you must either have Full Control or Design permissions. 


Enable and Configure Versioning
1. In a list or library, in the list or library tab, select Settings 



2. Select Versioning Settings 




Versioning Options
  • Content Approval: Use this section to decide whether or not to require content approval for items submitted to the list. 
  • Item (or Document) Version History: Use this section to select the various versioning options that are available to you. The following table lists each option and the impact of choosing it. NOTE: The Versioning Settings dialog box options differs slightly depending on whether you are working with lists or libraries. The table below reflects options available for both lists and library versioning settings. 
  • Draft Item Security section: Use this section to determine who should see drafts of items that are not yet approved. IMPORTANT: The set of options in this section are only available when the Content Approval section is set to Yes. You can allow any user who has Read permissions to the list to view the drafts, or you can restrict the view to only those users who can edit items or to only the author of the item and the people who can approve items. 
  • Require Check Out (for library versioning only): Select this option if you want to protect documents in this library from being modified by multiple users at the same time. Users will have to check out documents before editing them, and then check them back in when done.

Tech Tip Tuesday: Schedule a Skype for Business Meeting with Outlook

posted Jun 13, 2016, 11:50 AM by Whitney Greenwell   [ updated Jun 13, 2016, 11:53 AM ]



Schedule a Skype for Business Meeting with Outlook
Follow these instructions for setting up a meeting through Skype for Business by using the Outlook desktop server or the webmail app.




Set up an online meeting using Outlook server

1. Open Outlook, and go to your calendar.

2. On the Home tab ribbon, click New Skype Meeting.

3. Set up the meeting as you typically would, fill out the invitee section, subject, and the start and end time. If you’ll have in-person attendees, you can use Add Room to schedule a location. For a time that will work for everyone use the Scheduling Assistant.

4. In the meeting area, you can type an agenda or other information about the meeting. Be careful not to change any of the online meeting information.

5. Click Send.


Set up an online meeting using Outlook Web App

1. Login to the Outlook Web App
 
2. Click Calendar to open the Calendar app.

3. Click the plus sign or New just below the app launcher, and fill in the meeting information as usual.

4. In the middle of the meeting window, above the message area, click Online meeting.

5. Set up the meeting as you typically would, fill out the invitee section, subject, and the start and end time. If you’ll have in-person attendees, you can use Add Room to schedule a location. For a time that will work for everyone use the Scheduling Assistant.

6. In the meeting area, you can type an agenda or other information about the meeting. Be careful not to change any of the online meeting information.

7. At the top of the meeting window, click Send.


Tech Tip Tuesday: Outlook Permission Levels

posted Jun 7, 2016, 7:57 AM by Whitney Greenwell   [ updated Jun 7, 2016, 7:59 AM ]


Outlook Permission Levels

Outlook has many different permission levels for sharing parts of your account, such as your tasks or calendar. These levels are the same throughout all parts of Outlook.




Full

Full permission means the user can Read, Edit, and Delete a file or folder. The following three Permission Levels allow the granted person to delete files in the folder you give them access to. Use with caution.

  • Owner - This grants FULL permission to the selected folder. Typically a bad idea.

  • Publishing Editor - This also grants FULL permission to the selected folder, but it does not change who "owns" the folder. Be careful when using this option (useful if other people need to organize your folder)

  • Editor - This grants FULL permission, except for the ability to create new folders. Good for basic calendar sharing.


Edit/Delete

The following two Permission Levels allow the granted person to edit/delete only files they have created.

  • Publishing Author - Similar to Publishing Editor, except the granted user cannot delete files (or appointments) you have created.

  • Author - Similar to Editor, except the granted user cannot delete files (or appointments) that you have created.


Minimal Access

The following four Permission Levels grant minimal access to your folder.

  • Nonediting Author - The user can create items (not folders), but cannot edit anything. They can delete items that they have created.

  • Reviewer - The user can see folders, but not sub-folders.

  • Contributor - The user can create items.

  • None - The user has no permissions (That is why the Default user is setup with the Permission Level: None).



Download PDF version:
https://docs.google.com/a/cougars.ccis.edu/viewer?a=v&pid=sites&srcid=Y291Z2Fycy5jY2lzLmVkdXxjYy10ZWNobm9sb2d5LXNvbHV0aW9ucy10cmFpbmluZ3xneDo0OTlmNzg1NTYyMmVlNTNl

Tech Tip Tuesday: How to Take a Screen Capture

posted May 31, 2016, 6:56 AM by Whitney Greenwell

HOW TO TAKE A SCREEN CAPTURE 
Sometimes it's easier to show someone what you're seeing on your computer screen instead of explaining it. Both Mac and PC provide solutions for this with the ability to screenshot or screen capture. 



Screen Capture with PC

1. Press the PrtScn key on the keyboard. This copies an image of the screen to the clipboard.
2. Open Paint by clicking the Start button > All Programs > Accessories > Paint
3. In the Paint menu click Paste or Ctrl + V on the keyboard.
4. Save the image.


Screen Capture with Mac


1. Press Command + Shift + 3
2. Find the screen capture as a .png file saved on your desktop.



PDF version of this tech tip:
https://docs.google.com/a/cougars.ccis.edu/viewer?a=v&pid=sites&srcid=Y291Z2Fycy5jY2lzLmVkdXxjYy10ZWNobm9sb2d5LXNvbHV0aW9ucy10cmFpbmluZ3xneDo3Y2JhYzg2MjU0OTkwNzBi


Tech Tip Tuesday: Connect a SharePoint Calendar to Outlook

posted May 23, 2016, 2:22 PM by Whitney Greenwell

CONNECT A SHAREPOINT CALENDAR TO OUTLOOK
Open a SharePoint calendar in Outlook for the ability to create events and make edits in both SharePoint and Outlook. Outlook provides the ability to work with a SharePoint calendar offline. 


How to Connect Your SharePoint Calendar to Outlook

1. Make sure Outlook is open

2. Open Internet Explorer

3. Navigate to the SharePoint calendar you want to open in Outlook

4. Select the Calendar ribbon in the top right menu 


5. Click Connect to Outlook

6. In the pop up window, select Allow

7. If Outlook doesn’t come up automatically, go to the Outlook window and select Yes in the pop up window 


8. The calendar will show on the left sidebar with the SharePoint site name, listed under My Calendars


View this tech tip in PDF or video version:
Download PDF   
YouTube Video

Tech Tip Tuesday: Password Protect Documents with Microsoft Office

posted May 17, 2016, 8:29 AM by Whitney Greenwell

Password Protect Documents with Microsoft Office
Microsoft Office lets you encrypt your Office documents, allowing no one to even view the file unless they have the password. Modern versions of Office use secure encryption that you can rely on–assuming you set a strong password. 



How Secure Is Microsoft Office’s Password Protection?
There are two big things you need to watch out for. First, only passwords that fully encrypt the document are secure. Office also allows you to set a password to “Restrict Editing” of a file–in theory, allowing people to view a file but not edit it without a password. This type of password can be easily cracked and removed, allowing people to edit the file. Also, Office’s encryption only works well if you’re saving to modern document formats like .docx. If you save to older document formats like .doc–which are compatible with Office 2003 and earlier–Office will use the older, not-secure version of the encryption.


How to Password Protect an Office Document
1. Open the document to password protect 

2. Click File in the top left corner on the menu 

3. Make sure you’re on the Info page


4. Click Protect Document
The button is only named “Protect Document” in Microsoft Word, but it’s named something similar in other apps. Look for “Protect Workbook” in Microsoft Excel and “Protect Presentation” in Microsoft PowerPoint. In Microsoft Access, you’ll just see a an “Encrypt with Password” button on the Info tab. The steps will otherwise work the same.

5. Select Encrypt with Password
If you only want to restrict editing of the document, you can choose “Restrict Editing” here, but as we said, that is not very secure and can easily be bypassed. You’re better off encrypting the entire document, if you can.

6. Enter the password you want to encrypt the document with
You’ll lose access to the document if you ever forget your password, so keep it safe! Microsoft advises you write down the name of the document and its password and keep it in a safe place.

7. Click OK

8. The next time you open the document the password window will pop up to unlock the document.



Tech Tip Tuesday: Add Your Google Calendar in Outlook

posted May 9, 2016, 11:28 AM by Whitney Greenwell   [ updated May 9, 2016, 11:29 AM ]



Tech Tip Tuesday: Add Your Google Calendar in Outlook

Did you know you can view a Google calendar in your Outlook and it will update as you update your Google calendar? If you’re wanting to have an up-to-date Outlook calendar with your Google events this is a quick process to be able to do so! Unfortunately, this is the only way to view both Outlook and Google calendars within the same platform while both keeping up to date, but this way is helpful for those who utilize both. 


Click on the pictures to enlarge.

1. Navigate to your Google calendar at https://calendar.google.com and sign in.

2. For the calendar you’re wanting to use, click on the down arrow next to the calendar title in the left hand list. 


3. Click on Calendar settings

4. On the settings page, click the green ICAL button in the Calendar Address section. 


5. The calendar address window will pop up with the address. Right click on the link, and select Copy link address… 


6. Open your Outlook calendar and click Open Calendar from the top menu.

7. Select From Internet…


8. In the pop-up window, paste the copied link address and click OK


9. In the next pop-up window for subscription make sure to click OK again. This will subscribe you to updates of your Google calendar.


10. All done! Your calendar will show up in the left navigation menu under Other Calendars. You can do this for as many of your Google calendars as you would like.



To view and download the PDF version of this tip, click here.

Tech Tip Tuesday: Know Your File Extensions

posted May 3, 2016, 8:50 AM by Whitney Greenwell

Know Your File Extensions 


Information systems make use of different media types to improve user experience. There are many different media types and programs to create them. There are some file formats that will only open in the program you created them in (i.e. Photoshop), or there are formats that will open across programs, devices, and operating systems (i.e. PDF documents). But what are all of these extensions? What do they stand for? Below the tables are broken down into the different file types and the extensions within each type, and what the extension stands for. 

To download the Tech Tip for this week, click here.

Tech Training May 2016

posted May 2, 2016, 7:19 AM by Whitney Greenwell   [ updated May 2, 2016, 9:44 AM ]

The past month I have received a lot of questions about SharePoint and Outlook tasks, so these trainings are geared toward the most popular issues within Technology Services lately!

RSVP: training.ccis.edu




Wednesday May 11– SharePoint Users & Groups
10:00a – 11:00a BUH 107
2:00p – 3:00p Online


Thursday May 19 – Outlook Tasks
10:00a – 11:00a BUH 104
2:00p – 3:00p Online


Tuesday May 24 – SharePoint Calendar
10:00a – 11:00a BUH 104
2:00p – 3:00p Online

Spring Cleaning: Make Sure You’re Secure!

posted Apr 26, 2016, 8:28 AM by Whitney Greenwell

 

Spring Cleaning: Make Sure You’re Secure! 

For the last part of our spring cleaning series, make sure you’re data is secure! After cleaning everything up, go through and update passwords, clean up your security to keep a safer online presence!



Check to Ensure Protection
Check your devices and make sure they are all password, passcode, or fingerprint protected. The same for your accounts, making sure they are protected as well. Once you are sure everything is protected you can move on to the next steps for better protecting each account.


Two-Factor Authentication
Turn on two-factor authentication on accounts that offer this service. Critical accounts such as cloud services, banking, and social media are usually the accounts to offer two-factor authentication. Make sure you are always two steps ahead!


Make Better Passwords
By creating better passwords you can lower your risk for data loss. Create difficult, original passwords by combining upper and lower case letters, with numbers and symbols.


Make Unique Passwords
If you use the same password for each account and once is hacked, essentially all of your accounts can be hacked! Make sure each account you create a password for is unique and unlike your other accounts.


Stay Up to Date
Stay up to date with the latest security information by following our Cougar Security blog. You can regularly visit the page or subscribe for email updates at www.ccis.edu/cougarsecurity


To view or download the PDF version of this tech tip, click here

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