Symposium‎ > ‎

Fall 2009 - CSI Effect

-Fall 2009 Symposium-


 

On October 14, 2009, the Thomas M. Cooley Law School hosted its Symposium:

THE "CSI EFFECT" - JUROR EXPECTATIONS FOR FORENSIC SCIENCE: DOES REALITY MEET THE STANDARD?

On TV, DNA analysis takes minutes, latent fingerprints are lifted from a host of unusual locations, and video enhancement is state of the art.  But in reality, scientific technology does not yet permit the development of fingerprints on many surfaces.  The limits of forensic science are largely unknown to the general population, and cases can be backlogged for more than a year.  Does the "CSI Effect" actually exist?  Do jurors have expectations that cannot be met, resulting in acquittals or hung-juries, whereas, the same evidence presented ten years ago would have resulted in a conviction?  This year's distinguished speakers answered these questions from all aspects of the criminal justice system.  We were pleased to host the following speakers at the Thomas M. Cooley Law School:

 

  • GREGOIRE MICHAUD, Michigan State Police, Assistant Division Commander, Forensic Science Division                                     
  • LISA LINDSEY, Assistant Prosecutor, Wayne County Prosecuting Attorney's Office
  • FRANK REYNOLDS, Foster, Swift, Collins, and Smith, P.C.
  • HONORABLE DONALD SHELTON, Chief Judge, Pro Tem 22nd Circuit Trial Court, Washtenaw County
  • RONALD BRETZ, Professor, Thomas M. Cooley Law School, Moderator
Comments