William G. Fateley Student Award

    In 2010, the family and former group members of William G. Fateley, in conjunction with The Coblentz Society and The Society for Applied Spectroscopy, announced the formation of a Student Award to honor the career and life of William G. Fateley. The award consists of a $1000 prize to the selected student(s) and a plaque. Winners are recognized at the annual SciX conference presented by FACSS. 


    Although Bill Fateley passed away in 2009, he is still remembered as a larger-than-life figure in the spectroscopy community. Bill was a 1965 winner of the Coblentz Award and was highly regarded for his scientific contributions, but also loved by many people for his humor, his generosity, and for never taking himself too seriously (and some may have thought he was a bit of an ornery cuss, and Bill was ok with that too). At Bill's memorial service at Kansas State University, many speakers spoke of Bill's quick wit and his unmistakable laugh. Nearly everyone had examples of how he had provided personal support. Whether it was a material gift (a beautiful handmade clock) or a simple positive word when one was needed, Bill was always helping and encouraging people throughout his life. Perhaps Bill's biggest impact was his contributions to the social fraternity of international Spectroscopy in the pre-LinkedIn, pre-Facebook world. His long years of service to Pittcon, serving as Conference President in 1971, and to the Society for Applied Spectroscopy, serving as Editor of Applied Spectroscopy for 20 years, were a benefit to us all.

    Another lasting component of Bill's legacy was his encouragement for students to attend professional conferences and meet their peers. He made it a goal to introduce young scientists to the "people" in the field and to get them personally involved. Fostering this interaction was important to Bill; perhaps as much as it was for the Science. His efforts included sending his students to many international conferences. If need be, he even went as far as to bring the social interaction center (disguised as a mobile spectroscopy lab) directly to the conference. Bill's commitment to encouraging students to attend conferences, meet and interact with their colleagues and contribute to the field of Spectroscopy, has produced a whole new generation of spectroscopists. His efforts also have greatly enriched the groups and societies that Bill championed so strongly. This is the legacy that we hope to continue with the establishment of this award.

    The William G. Fateley Student Award is administered by the Coblentz Society.   Awardees are selected from the recipients of the Coblentz Student Award by mutual agreement of the Student Affairs Committee and the Fateley donor group.  William G. Fateley Student Awardees most closely embody the spirit of Bill’s desire to promote the science and society of spectroscopy.  All members are invited to nominate a student worthy of recognition for a Coblentz Student Award by virtue of their interests in vibrational spectroscopy during the open window for nominations.  This nomination makes the student a candidate for the William G. Fateley Student Award at the same time.

Regards,
Prof. Michael L. Myrick
President, Coblentz Society 2011-2013


Contributions to the Fateley award endowment are currently being solicited. Please contribute by contacting the Coblentz Society treasurer.


Nominations

   To be considered for the William G. Fateley Award, nominators should follow the instructions for Coblentz Student Awards.



2016 William G. Fateley Student Award

Mustafa Unal, Case Western Reserve University, Professor Ozan Akkus

Mustafa Unal received his B.Sc. degree in Mechanical Engineering from Selcuk University in Turkey. His success in B.Sc. was recognized with M.Sc. and PhD fellowships from Turkish Government. He is currently a PhD candidate under the supervision of Prof. Ozan Akkus at Case Western Reserve University. His current research includes Raman spectroscopic analysis of bone and cartilage with diseases and aging. He has recently developed Raman spectroscopy-based a novel nondestructive modality to assess hydration status in bone and cartilage. It was the first time in the literature that OH-stretching band region was characterized for bone and cartilage to identify different water compartments as a novel tool to assess bone and cartilage quality. He further works on several side projects including the novel use of Raman spectroscopic techniques for point of care testing devices such as diagnosis of crystals in urine for early detection of kidney stone formation and diagnosis of crystals-induced arthropathies. Since 2014, he has published 6 peer-reviewed articles, 1 book chapter, and presented 13 poster/oral presentations in scientific conferences. He has been recognized as a promising young investigator in the field of biomedical vibrational spectroscopy and musculoskeletal biomechanics, as evidenced by several national and international prestigious awards, including FACSS Student Award, ORS Osteoarthritis Young Investigator Award, Baxter Young Investigator Award, The Victor M. Goldberg Award, and The George W. Codrington Charitable Foundation Student Research Award. He has been also selected as one of the ten finalists of 2016 CIMIT Student Technology Prize for Primary Healthcare.





2015 William G. Fateley Student Award


Marie Richard-Lacroix, Université de Montréal, Professor Christian Pellerin

     Marie Richard-Lacroix is currently a Ph.D. candidate under the supervision of Prof. Christian Pellerin at the Department of Chemistry of the University of Montreal. She received her bachelor's degree in chemistry in 2011 from the University of Montreal. During her undergraduate studies, she worked in Prof. Pellerin's group on the formation and characterization of supramolecular polymer complexes with small molecules into electrospun nanofibers. For this work, she received the Undergraduate thesis award from the Macromolecular science and engineering division of the Canadian Society for Chemistry. As a graduate student, her main research interest focusses on
the characterization of molecular orientation and structural aspects of electrospun nanofibers by confocal Raman spectroscopy. She was the first to demonstrate that quantitative information can be obtained on individual nanofibers. She established a new, experimentally simplified method with improved accuracy for orientation quantification by Raman spectroscopy. She also works on the characterization of ultrathin films by infrared spectroscopy. Up to now, she has published 9 peer-reviewed papers, including 8 as a first author and a review article. She is also author or coauthor of over 35 contributions presented in national and international conferences. She earned several awards and scholarships, including from NSERC-Canada, FRQNT-Québec and the Society for applied spectroscopy.


2014 William G. Fateley Student Award

Chris Huber, University of Minnesota, Professor Aaron Massari


2013 William G. Fateley Student Award

Tomasz P. Wrobel, Jagiellonian University, Professor Malgorzata Baranska

Tomasz P. Wrobel     Tomasz P. Wrobel graduated from “Advanced Spectroscopy in Chemistry” Erasmus Mundus master programme in 2010, yielding a double diploma of USTL Lille 1 (France) and Jagiellonian University (Krakow, Poland). He completed a master thesis about atherosclerotic tissue imaging with FT-IR spectroscopy and is continuing this topic throughout his PhD studies under supervision of Professor Malgorzata Baranska. He is also an assistant in Jagiellonian Centre for Experimental Therapeutics (JCET). He has published 10 peer-reviewed articles (another 4 are in the process of revision) and 2 book chapters (another one is being reviewed). He has received several awards and stipends including an award by the Polish Chemical Society for the best presentation of master thesis results, regional “Doctus” fund for the best doctoral students and an award given by the polish Ministry of Education for the best doctoral students.

2012 William G. Fateley Student Award


Xiaohua (Sarah) Zhou, University of Missouri-Kansas City, Professor James R. Durig

    Xiaohua (Sarah) Zhou is completing her Ph.D. degree in Chemistry at the University of Missouri-Kansas City with Dr. James R. Durig. Her research is focused on understanding the structural properties and dynamics of quasi-linear molecules with a special emphasis on molecules containing the isocyanate moiety. The research is conducted by utilizing infrared, Raman, and microwave spectroscopy along with theoretical investigation. She has published 14 peer-reviewed papers and is expected to have five more prior to her graduation in May 2013. During her graduate studies, she worked as a research assistant in the University of Kansas Medical Center carrying out research on the molecular and thermodynamic mechanism of allosteric regulations by utilizing Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry. Xiaohua has received several awards which include the Gates Millennium Scholars-Asian & Pacific Islander American Scholarship fund, the Outstanding Merit Award from the UMKC Women’s Council and first place for her poster presentation at FACSS 2011.

2011 William G. Fateley Student Award


Rohith Reddy, Univ. of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Professor Rohit Bhargava

    Rohith Reddy is a Bioengineering graduate student in the Chemical Imaging and Structures Laboratory, headed by Professor Rohit Bhargava at the University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign. His research interests include design of novel instrumentation and imaging technologies for infrared spectroscopy. His current research is focused on creating and enhancing mid-Infrared Spectroscopic Imaging techniques for biomedical applications. His work also presents important advances in using FT-IR imaging for tissue type identification and cancer detection in prostate and breast tissue. Previously, he obtained his B.Tech and M.Tech. in Electrical Engineering from Indian Institute of Technology (IIT) Madras. In his doctoral work he has so far published 5 peer reviewed papers, 1 book chapter and filed 1 patent. As a graduate student he has won the FACSS student poster award in 2007 and 2009, the Bioengineering Student Award (2010) and Graduate Student Achievement Award (2009) at the University of Illinois and co-authored the bronze medal winning paper at Genetic and Evolutionary Computation Conference (GECCO) 2007 held at London.

2010 Inaugural William G. Fateley Student Award


Ali Eftekhari-Bafrooei, Temple University, Ph.D. 2010, Professor Eric Borguet

    Ali Eftekhari-Bafrooei received his M.Sc. degree in Physical Chemistry from Sharif University in Tehran, Iran where he studied surface reaction mechanisms. He traveled to the USA to join Professor Borguet’s group at Temple University in 2005 and is currently working as a postdoctoral fellow in the group of Professor Stephen Leone at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. During his PhD he studied the vibrational spectroscopy and dynamics of interfacial water using vibrational sum-frequency generation (SFG). His experiments were the first to reveal how the ultrafast vibrational dynamics of water at a solid interface (H20/Si02) can be slowed down, a consequence of the reduced number of neighbors. Furthermore, he used dilute solutions of HDO in D20 to decouple the 0-H stretch and observed a frequency dependent vibrational relaxation of this mode. The redshift of the 0-H stretch in SFG spectra with increasing charge at the silica surface suggested a correlation with the strength of the hydrogen bond network. This provided a connection between the spectroscopy and dynamics of water at a charged interface, and existing theoretical models for vibrational dynamics of bulk hydrogen bonded systems. In addition, he has contributed to a variety of studies where vibrational SFG has been critical in determining the structure of self assembled monolayers and their effect on processes as diverse as neuronal cell growth and electronic device fabrication.