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Seawell Nurse's Health Corner

Welcome to the Health Corner of Eileen Stough, Seawell's RN serving the daily health needs of our students 

For Bitmoji Health Room: Nurse Eileen Stough's Health Room

For CHCCS District Health Information and Medication/Health Forms: CHCCS District Health Information (Health Services)

Hi there! My name is Eileen Stough and I've been the school RN at Seawell since March 2007. I was a NICU RN (neonatal intensive care unit) for many years prior to coming here. I moved back to Chapel Hill from Charlotte, NC and enjoy being back in my "hometown"; I'm proud to say that I am a CHHS alum. I received my BSN at UNC-Chapel Hill and my MSN (FNP concentration) at UNC-Charlotte. I am here to help your child with any physical, emotional, or psychological needs within the nursing field. I hope that you contact me if you have health information about your child or any health questions/concerns. 

Please consider donating items for the health room. Here's a wish list: Seawell Health Room Wish List

Here is the district's policy regarding illness (Policy 4230, G): 
G.  MANAGEMENT OF SUDDEN ILLNESS

1. Students with temperature of 100 degrees Fahrenheit (oral), vomiting, or diarrhea will be excluded from school, and may not participate in school activities until symptom-free for 24 hours.

2. Students with undiagnosed rash may be excluded from school.  If excluded from school, readmission is contingent upon a note from a physician, being symptom free, and receiving appropriate treatment.

3. In the event of numerous cases of sudden illness in a school, the school nurse and principal shall notify the Orange County Health Department for epidemiologic surveillance and recommendations.

Vaccine Clinics for Nov 18-19, 2021

posted Nov 17, 2021, 10:03 AM by Eileen Stough


VACCINE NOW AVAILABLE FOR AGES 5 AND UP

posted Nov 4, 2021, 4:23 AM by Eileen Stough

Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 Vaccine Now Available for Children Ages 5 to 11

Children ages 5 to 11 can now receive a safe and effective COVID-19 vaccine. The Food and Drug Administration has authorized a lower dose of the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine for children in this age group, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommend all children 5–11 get the vaccine to protect against serious illness and help keep them healthy.

In Orange County there are multiple places that your 5-to-11-year-old can be vaccinated, including pediatric clinics, K-12 schools, local pharmacies and “pop-up events.” These opportunities are described below:

If you have a medical provider for your child, call your pediatric clinic to find out if they are taking vaccine appointments.

If you prefer evening hours, StarMed is offering vaccination clinics at Orange County Schools:

  • Visit https://unityphr.com/campaigns/starmed/vaccine
  • Select “Pediatric Pfizer”
  • Select “first dose”
  • Select “Orange County”
  • Select your preferred school location
  • Select “view slots” to see the dates and times that are available.

 (**CHCCS NOTE: Please know that locations within the Chapel Hill-Carrboro City Schools district will be scheduled in the near future, but are not listed on the “StarMed” registration page. However, anyone is welcome to register for the Orange County appointments.)

The Health Department will be offering pop-up vaccine clinics specifically for 5-to-11-year-olds by appointment only on Thursday, Nov. 4 and Friday, Nov. 5 from 4-8 p.m. Please call 919-913-8088 or visit takemyshot.nc.gov to schedule.

Hillsborough Pharmacy is offering vaccination appointments on Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays, and Sundays by appointment only. Please call 919-245-1212 or visit www.indycarehealth.com.

Village Pediatrics is offering vaccination appointments Monday through Friday, 7:30 a.m. – 5 p.m., and Saturdays from 8 a.m. – Noon. Please call 919-969-9611 or visit www.villagepediatrics.com

As additional vaccine clinics become available, the North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services will post them here: https://covid19.ncdhhs.gov/vaccines/kids/locations

Please bear in mind that appointments are limited at this time. More appointments will become available in the coming days and weeks.

Again, to read the full announcement from the Orange County Health Department, click here.

North Carolina’s actions are based on recommendations from the CDC. Read the CDC’s full statement here.

For more information about how vaccines for children work and where you can find a vaccination appointment nearby, visit MySpot.nc.gov. The North Carolina Vaccine Help Center at 888-675-4567 can also help you make an appointment. It is open 7 a.m.–7 p.m. on weekdays and 8 a.m.–4 p.m. on weekends.


WEEKLY COVID SURVEILLANCE TESTING

posted Sep 30, 2021, 10:22 AM by Eileen Stough

Please know that each school has their own link specific for their school. So, if you signed up your child and got a link from someone at another school, you may have signed him/her up at a different school. For example, we have over 120+ students signed up for testing at Seawell who do not go here.

Surveillance testing is a rapid test. If positive then the student will be called back to do a PCR test and (s)he and any siblings will need to be sent home immediately until the PCR result is back. Signing up will also allow a PCR test to be done if your child becomes symptomatic while at school

If you would like to sign up your child, use the following link: Seawell ONLY Testing Sign UpThis is the link to sign up your child for weekly surveillance testing.at Seawell ONLY.

PARENT NOTICE ABOUT HEALTH & ILLNESS PROCEDURES FOR RETURN TO IN PERSON INSTRUCTION

posted Aug 25, 2021, 8:05 AM by Eileen Stough

Notices to parents re Health and Illness procedures for return to in person instruction



 As we return to school it is more important than ever to be vigilant about monitoring children for any signs or symptoms of illness. Due to the non -specific nature of COVID19 symptoms, children with any signs of illness should not be sent to school. 


In order to protect the health and safety of your children, all students with symptoms of illness will be kept  in a separate, supervised space until they can be picked up by a parent or guardian . We ask that, if  you are called to pick  up your child, you do so as soon as possible.  

 

Due to the non -specific nature of COVID19 symptoms . Children with symptoms of illness will be quarantined for 14 days from the onset of symptoms that include Fever or chills, Cough, Shortness of breath or difficulty breathing, Fatigue, Muscle or body aches, Headache, New loss of taste or smell,Sore throat, Congestion or runny nose, Nausea or vomiting, Diarrhea, and must be approved before returning to in person learning. We will strictly enforce all 14 day quarantines for identified contacts of positive cases and a 10 day isolation for those with confirmed cases of COVID 19 as directed by the Orange County Health Department. 

COVID-19 QUARANTINE SUMMARY GUIDELINES FOR STAFF AND STUDENTS (as of Aug 19, 2021)

posted Aug 23, 2021, 5:48 AM by Eileen Stough   [ updated Aug 23, 2021, 5:50 AM ]

Please know that the guidelines for CHCCS receives updates from the Orange County Health Dept so this is a fluid document. Updated information will be posted if changes occur.


Please notify me if your student has any of the following symptoms and please make sure that you keep them home.



NEW COVID-19 Quarantine Summary Guidelines for Staff and Students 

Revised August 19, 2021


NEW List of COVID-19

Toolkit pg 13

***This document has been provided for your convenience only.  All quarantine judgements will be made at the discretion of the Orange County Health Department in collaboration with the CHCCS school health nurses. Any deviation in quarantine instructions from a school health nurse or the OCHD will default to their judgement not this unofficial document. It is updated frequently and without notice so please bookmark it and check back as needed***



  1. Temperature of 100.4 degrees Fahrenheit or higher 

  2. Sore Throat 

  3. Cough (for students with chronic cough due to allergies or asthma, a change in their cough from baseline) 

  4. Difficulty breathing (for students with asthma, a change from their baseline breathing) 

  5. New loss of taste or smell

  6. Diarrhea or vomiting 

  7. New onset of severe headache, especially with a fever

  8. Fatigue

  9. Muscle or body aches

  10. Congestion or runny nose

  11. Nausea

The presence of any of these symptoms generally suggests a student, teacher, or staff member has an infectious illness and should not attend school, regardless of whether the illness is COVID-19. For students, staff, and teachers with chronic conditions, symptom presence should represent a change from their typical health status to warrant exclusion from school. Occurrence of any of these symptoms while a student, teacher, or staff member is at school suggests the person may be referred for diagnostic COVID-19 testing.

 

 








Possible COVID-19 Scenarios:


IF

THEN

COVID-19 Positive (PCR test) no symptoms


-per Toolkit w/OCHD approval

  • Quarantine for 10 Days from PCR COVID-19 positive test 


COVID-19 Positive (antigen test, no symptoms, no known close contact)


-per Toolkit w/OCHD approval

  • If the person takes a repeat PCR/molecular test performed in a laboratory within 24 – 48 hours of their positive antigen test, and that PCR/molecular test is negative: the positive antigen test can be considered a false positive and the person can immediately return to school;  OR

  • If the person does not take a repeat PCR/molecular test, or takes one within 24 – 48 hours and it is also positive, the person can return to school 10 days after the first positive test, as long as they did not develop symptoms.

  • Once the quarantine period is complete the person is not required to have documentation of a negative test in order to return to school.


COVID-19 Positive with symptoms (antigen or PCR test)


-per Toolkit w/OCHD approval

  • 10 Days since the first day of symptoms

AND

  • 24 hours since fever (w/o fever reducing medication)

AND

  • Other symptoms of COVID-19 are improving

  • Once the quarantine period is complete the person is not required to have documentation of a negative test in order to return to school.


Symptoms - No health care provider visit, or COVID-19 testing


-per Toolkit w/OCHD approval

  • The individual completes 10 days of isolation. Isolation should begin starting from the first day of symptoms; 

                                    OR

  • May return to school when the student/staff member receives a negative (-) PCR COVID-19 diagnostic test

AND

  • It has been at least 24 hours since the person had a fever (without using fever reducing medicine) 

AND 

  • Other symptoms of COVID-19 are improving


Symptoms, Alternate Diagnosis


-per Toolkit w/OCHD approval

  • May return to school the when student/staff member receives a negative (-) COVID-19 diagnostic test IF the negative test was a negative PCR/molecular test  

AND/OR

  • May return to school when the student/staff member receives their alternate diagnosis from their primary care provider in writing stating the student/staff member does not have COVID-19 and providing a return date.

AND

  • It has been at least 24 hours since the person had a fever (without using fever reducing medicine) 

AND

  • Has felt well for at least 24 hours


Close Contact w/o symptoms unvaccinated

  • May return in 10 days as long as they experience no symptoms during that time period

  • The 10 days of quarantine begin after the last known close contact with the COVID-19 positive individual.

  • Close Contacts who are not fully vaccinated should be tested immediately after being identified, and, if negative, tested again in 5–7 days after last exposure or immediately if symptoms develop during quarantine.”


Close Contact - Quarantine Exceptions


-per CDC w/OCHD approval

Do not need to quarantine IF:

  • Individuals who are fully vaccinated and do not have symptoms do NOT need to quarantine after a close contact. They should get tested 3-5 days after exposure, monitor for symptoms closely, wear a mask around others consistently and correctly, and practice strict 6’ social distancing. Do not attend large group gatherings.

  •  Students (not adults) that are identified as close contacts to a COVID-19 positive student, where both students are correctly and consistently wearing a cloth face covering, and are not experiencing symptoms do not have to be quarantined. It is recommended that they get tested 3 to 5 days after exposure. This exception does not apply to exposures during extracurricular or athletic activities and does not apply to teachers, staff, or other adults in the indoor classroom setting

  • Close Contacts who are not fully vaccinated should be tested immediately after being identified, and, if negative, tested again in 5–7 days after last exposure or immediately if symptoms develop during quarantine.” This does not mean that they would stop quarantining with a negative result.

Household Members (ex. siblings attending school in the district) of COVID-19 Positive

  • 10 Days from last contact (OCHD)

  • 10 days begin after the last known close contact with the COVID-19 positive case

  • This could mean 20+ days of quarantine


Household Members (ex. Siblings attending school in the district) with COVID-19 like symptoms

  • Don’t not have to be sent home until the symptomatic student tested positive for COVID-19

  • If the symptomatic student does not get tested the household members (siblings) must quarantine for the full 10 days from the start of symptoms

International Travel Guidance - Fully Vaccinated

  • It is encouraged for the person to get a PCR COVID-19 test 3 to 5 days after returning home

  • Do not have to self isolate as long as they remain symptom free, unless they care for a medically fragile student which would require 14 days before returning to work 

International Travel Guidance - Not Vaccinated

  • Get tested with a viral test 3-5 days after travel AND stay home and self-quarantine for a full 7 days after travel.

    • Even if you test negative, stay home and self-quarantine for the full 7 days.

    • If your test is positive, isolate yourself to protect others from getting infected.

  • If you don’t get tested, stay home and self-quarantine for 10 days after travel.

  • Avoid being around people who are at increased risk for severe illness for 14 days, whether you get tested or not.

  • Avoid large group gatherings for 14 days, whether you get tested or not.

  • Self-monitor for COVID-19 symptoms; isolate and get tested if you develop symptoms.

  •  Employees who work with medically fragile students would require 14 days before returning to work 

 



***This document has been provided for your convenience only.  All quarantine judgements will be made at the discretion of the Orange County Health Department in collaboration with the CHCCS school health nurses. Any deviation in quarantine instructions from a school health nurse or the OCHD will default to their judgement not this unofficial document. It is updated frequently and without notice so please bookmark it and check back as needed***


TeenVaxFacts.com Launches to Inform North Carolina Teens on COVID-19 Vaccines

posted Aug 16, 2021, 6:59 AM by Eileen Stough

Information is also provided in Spanish below. (Información en español a continuación.)

North Carolina’s Department of Health and Human Services has launched TeenVaxFacts.com – a website dedicated to providing teens with the information, tools and resources they need to educate themselves, their friends and family members about the benefits of COVID-19 vaccines.
With access to materials such as a COVID-19 vaccine discussion guide, vaccine locations and informative videos, this site will serve as a place for teens to get the facts about COVID-19.

Please share TeenVaxFacts.com widely among your networks.

The website launches at a time when getting vaccinated is critical, especially for younger people. The highly contagious Delta variant is spreading through North Carolina. Places with low vaccination rates are seeing increased COVID-19 cases, hospitalizations and deaths. The majority of new COVID-19 cases are in people who are not fully vaccinated. COVID-19 vaccines protect against severe illness, hospitalization and death from the Delta variant.

Young people are getting the virus, just like everyone else—and school is just around the corner. Getting teens vaccinated is the best way to protect them, prevent the spread of COVID-19 and protect family members. 

COVID-19 vaccines have been thoroughly tested and found to be safe and effective for anyone 12 and older. TeenVaxFacts.com sends a clear, fact-based message to teens and parents: Don’t wait to vaccinate.

For more information about COVID-19 vaccines in North Carolina, visit YourSpotYourShot.nc.gov or call the state’s COVID-19 Vaccine Help Center at 888-675-4567. 

El Departamento de Salud y Servicios Humanos de Carolina del Norte ha lanzado VacunasParaJovenes.com, un sitio web dedicado para brindar información, herramientas y recursos que los adolescentes necesitan para educarse a sí mismos, a sus amigos y familiares sobre los beneficios de las vacunas contra el COVID-19.
 
Con acceso a materiales como una guía de discusión sobre las vacunas contra el COVID-19, información sobre los centros de vacunación y videos informativos, este sitio servirá como un lugar para que los adolescentes obtengan información sobre el COVID-19.
 
Por favor comparte VacunasParaJovenes.com ampliamente entre tus redes.
 
El sitio web se lanza en un momento en el que vacunarse es fundamental, especialmente para las personas más jóvenes. La variante Delta, que es altamente contagiosa, se está extendiendo por Carolina del Norte. Los lugares con bajas tasas de vacunación están experimentando un aumento de casos, hospitalizaciones y muertes a causa del COVID-19. La mayoría de los casos nuevos de COVID-19 ocurren en personas que no están vacunadas completamente. Las vacunas contra el COVID-19 protegen contra la enfermedad grave, la hospitalización y la muerte causada por la variante Delta.
 
Las personas jóvenes contraen el virus, al igual que todos los demás, y el regreso a clases está a la vuelta de la esquina. Vacunar a los adolescentes es la mejor manera de protegerlos, prevenir la propagación del COVID-19 y proteger a toda la familia.
 
Las vacunas contra el COVID-19 se han probado exhaustivamente y se ha demostrado que son seguras y efectivas para cualquier persona de 12 años o más. VacunasParaJovenes.com envía un mensaje claro y basado en hechos a los adolescentes y a sus padres: No esperen para vacunarse.
 
Para obtener más información sobre las vacunas contra el COVID-19 en Carolina del Norte, visita Vacunate.nc.gov o llama gratuitamente al Centro de Ayuda para la Vacunación contra el COVID-19 del estado al 888-675-4567.

COVID NOTICE TO PARENTS WHEN TO KEEP STUDENTS HOME (updated 4-16-21)

posted Apr 21, 2021, 9:43 AM by Eileen Stough

Notices to parents: Health and Illness procedures

for return to in-person instruction


As we return to school, it is more important than ever to be vigilant about monitoring children for any signs or symptoms of illness. Due to the non-specific nature of COVID-19 symptoms, children with any signs of illness should not be sent to school. In order to protect the health and safety of all children and staff, any student who develops symptoms of illness at school will be kept in a separate, supervised space until they can be picked up by a parent or guardian. We ask that, if you are called to pick up your child, you do so as soon as possible. No Ibuprofen (Advil) or

Acetaminophen (Tylenol) will be given at school as this can mask symptoms of illness. 


Children with symptoms of illness and their siblings will be quarantined at home for 10 days from the onset of symptoms and must have approval from the School Nurse before returning to in-person learning. Students are encouraged to fully engage in online learning while quarantining at home.


A written note from a medical provider clearing the student to return to school OR a negative PCR test (must be a PCR not rapid) will be accepted and allow the student and siblings to return to school before the 10 day quarantine period.


Symptoms of illness include:

  • Fever (100 ℉ or 38 ℃)
  • Cough *
  • Shortness of breath or difficulty breathing
  • New loss of taste or smell
  • Headache - Severe
  • Sore throat
  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhea


Orange County Health Department’s 10-day quarantine for those with: 

  • Confirmed cases of COVID 19

And a 14-day quarantine for those who are:

  • Close contacts of positive COVID 19 cases


Please contact your Seawell School Nurse, Eileen Stough, at 919-967-4343 or estough@chccs.k12.nc.us with any questions or concerns regarding this policy.



Updated April 16, 2021

COVID-19 QUARANTINE SUMMARY FOR STAFF AND STUDENTS (REVISED 4-8-21)

posted Apr 12, 2021, 8:06 AM by Eileen Stough

Revised April 8, 2021


NEW List of COVID-19

Toolkit pg 13



  1. Temperature of 100.4 degrees Fahrenheit or higher 

  2. Sore Throat 

  3. Cough (for students with chronic cough due to allergies or asthma, a change in their cough from baseline) 

  4. Difficulty breathing (for students with asthma, a change from their baseline breathing) 

  5. New loss of taste or smell

  6. Diarrhea

  7. Vomiting 

  8. New onset of severe headache, especially with a fever

 

 

The presence of any of these symptoms generally suggests a student, teacher, or staff member has an infectious illness and should not attend school, regardless of whether the illness is COVID-19. For students, staff, and teachers with chronic conditions, symptom presence should represent a change from their typical health status to warrant exclusion from school. Occurrence of any of these symptoms while a student, teacher, or staff member is at school suggests the person may be referred for diagnostic COVID-19 testing.

 



Possible COVID-19 Scenarios:


IF

THEN

COVID-19 Positive (PCR test) no symptoms


-per Toolkit w/OCHD approval

  • 10 Days from PCR COVID-19 positive test 


COVID-19 Positive (antigen test, no symptoms, no known close contact)


-per Toolkit w/OCHD approval

  • 10 Days from PCR COVID-19 positive test 


COVID-19 Positive with symptoms (antigen or PCR test)


-per Toolkit w/OCHD approval

  • 10 Days since the first day of symptoms

AND

  • 24 hours since fever (w/o fever reducing medication)

AND

  • Other symptoms of COVID-19 are improving

Symptoms - No health care provider visit


-per Toolkit w/OCHD approval

  • The person completes 10 days of isolation. Isolation should begin starting from the first day of symptoms; 

AND

  • It has been at least 24 hours since the person had a fever (without using fever reducing medicine) 

AND 

  • Other symptoms of COVID-19 are improving

  • A Negative test does not shorten the 10 days of isolation


Symptoms, Alternate Diagnosis


-per Toolkit w/OCHD approval

  • Can return to school when the student/staff member receives their alternate diagnosis from their primary care provider in writing.

AND

  • It has been at least 24 hours since the person had a fever (without using fever reducing medicine) 

AND

  • Has felt well for at least 24 hours

  • A negative test does not shorten the 10 days of isolation

Close Contact


-per Toolkit w/OCHD approval

  • 14 Days from last contact (OCHD)

  • 14 days begin after the last known close contact with the COVID-19 positive case



Close Contact - Fully Vaccinated, no symptoms


-per CDC w/OCHD approval

Do not need to quarantine IF they:

  • Are fully vaccinated (i.e., at least 2 weeks after getting their second dose in a 2-dose series or one-dose of a single-dose series)

  • Have had no symptoms from when they were exposed to someone with COVID-19

  • Live outside of a group setting. Individuals in group settings such as group homes, jails, etc., still need to quarantine following an exposure.

Household Members (siblings) COVID-19 Positive

  • 14 Days from last contact (OCHD)

  • 14 days begin after the last known close contact with the COVID-19 positive case


Household Members (siblings) Symptoms

  • 14 Days from last contact (OCHD)

  • 14 days begin after the last known close contact with the COVID-19 positive case

  • May return IF the symptomatic student tests negative for COVID-19

  • May return IF the symptomatic student gets an alternative diagnosis from their primary care provider in writing

SEASONAL ALLERGIES

posted Apr 7, 2021, 10:03 AM by Eileen Stough

It's that wonderful time of year: Seasonal Allergies!

Seasonal allergies: Nip them in the bud

Relieve seasonal allergies with these tried-and-true techniques.

By Mayo Clinic Staff

Spring means flower buds and blooming trees — and if you're one of the millions of people who have seasonal allergies, it also means sneezing, congestion, a runny nose and other bothersome symptoms. Seasonal allergies — also called hay fever and allergic rhinitis — can make you miserable. But before you settle for plastic flowers and artificial turf, try these simple strategies to keep seasonal allergies under control.

Reduce your exposure to allergy triggers

To reduce your exposure to the things that trigger your allergy signs and symptoms (allergens):

  • Stay indoors on dry, windy days. The best time to go outside is after a good rain, which helps clear pollen from the air.
  • Delegate lawn mowing, weed pulling and other gardening chores that stir up allergens.
  • Remove clothes you've worn outside and shower to rinse pollen from your skin and hair.
  • Don't hang laundry outside — pollen can stick to sheets and towels.
  • Wear a pollen mask if you do outside chores.

Take extra steps when pollen counts are high

Seasonal allergy signs and symptoms can flare up when there's a lot of pollen in the air. These steps can help you reduce your exposure:

  • Check your local TV or radio station, your local newspaper, or the Internet for pollen forecasts and current pollen levels.
  • If high pollen counts are forecasted, start taking allergy medications before your symptoms start.
  • Close doors and windows at night or any other time when pollen counts are high.
  • Avoid outdoor activity in the early morning when pollen counts are highest.

Keep indoor air clean

There's no miracle product that can eliminate all allergens from the air in your home, but these suggestions may help:

  • Use the air conditioning in your house and car.
  • If you have forced air heating or air conditioning in your house, use high-efficiency filters and follow regular maintenance schedules.
  • Keep indoor air dry with a dehumidifier.
  • Use a portable high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter in your bedroom.
  • Clean floors often with a vacuum cleaner that has a HEPA filter.

Try an over-the-counter remedy

Several types of nonprescription medications can help ease allergy symptoms. They include:

  • Oral antihistamines. Antihistamines can help relieve sneezing, itching, a runny nose and watery eyes. Examples of oral antihistamines include loratadine (Claritin, Alavert), cetirizine (Zyrtec Allergy) and fexofenadine (Allegra Allergy).
  • Decongestants. Oral decongestants such as pseudoephedrine (Sudafed, Afrinol, others) can provide temporary relief from nasal stuffiness. Decongestants also come in nasal sprays, such as oxymetazoline (Afrin) and phenylephrine (Neo-Synephrine). Only use nasal decongestants for a few days in a row. Longer-term use of decongestant nasal sprays can actually worsen symptoms (rebound congestion).
  • Nasal spray. Cromolyn sodium nasal spray can ease allergy symptoms and doesn't have serious side effects, though it's most effective when you begin using it before your symptoms start.
  • Combination medications. Some allergy medications combine an antihistamine with a decongestant. Examples include loratadine-pseudoephedrine (Claritin-D) and fexofenadine-pseudoephedrine (Allegra-D).

Rinse your sinuses

Rinsing your nasal passages with saline solution (nasal irrigation) is a quick, inexpensive and effective way to relieve nasal congestion. Rinsing directly flushes out mucus and allergens from your nose.

Look for a squeeze bottle or a neti pot — a small container with a spout designed for nasal rinsing — at your pharmacy or health food store. Use water that's distilled, sterile, previously boiled and cooled, or filtered using a filter with an absolute pore size of 1 micron or smaller to make up the saline irrigation solution. Also be sure to rinse the irrigation device after each use with similarly distilled, sterile, previously boiled and cooled, or filtered water and leave open to air-dry.

Interested in alternative treatments? Consider these

A number of natural remedies have been used to treat hay fever symptoms. Treatments that may help include extracts of the shrub butterbur and spirulina (a type of dried algae). However, the benefits and safety aren't clear.

Some people claim acupuncture can help with seasonal allergy symptoms. There's some evidence that acupuncture works, and there's little evidence of harm.

Talk to your doctor before trying alternative treatments.

When home remedies aren't enough, see your doctor

For many people, avoiding allergens and taking over-the-counter medications is enough to ease symptoms. But if your seasonal allergies are still bothersome, don't give up. A number of other treatments are available.

If you have bad seasonal allergies, your doctor may recommend that you have skin tests or blood tests to find out exactly what allergens trigger your symptoms. Testing can help determine what steps you need to take to avoid your specific triggers and identify which treatments are likely to work best for you.

For some people, allergy shots (allergen immunotherapy) can be a good option. Also known as desensitization, this treatment involves regular injections containing tiny amounts of the substances that cause your allergies. Over time, these injections reduce the immune system reaction that causes symptoms. For some allergies, treatment can be given as tablets under the tongue.

UPDATED QUARANTINE SUMMARY GUIDELINES FOR STUDENTS AND STAFF

posted Apr 6, 2021, 7:47 AM by Eileen Stough

NEW List of COVID-19

Toolkit pg 13

  1. Temperature of 100.4 degrees Fahrenheit or higher 

  2. Sore Throat 

  3. Cough (for students with chronic cough due to allergies or asthma, a change in their cough from baseline) 

  4. Difficulty breathing (for students with asthma, a change from their baseline breathing) 

  5. New loss of taste or smell

  6. Diarrhea

  7. vomiting 

  8. New onset of severe headache, especially with a fever

 

 

The presence of any of these symptoms generally suggests a student, teacher, or staff member has an infectious illness and should not attend school, regardless of whether the illness is COVID-19. For students, staff, and teachers with chronic conditions, symptom presence should represent a change from their typical health status to warrant exclusion from school. Occurrence of any of these symptoms while a student, teacher, or staff member is at school suggests the person may be referred for diagnostic COVID-19 testing.

 



Possible COVID-19 Scenarios:


IF

THEN

COVID-19 Positive (PCR test) no symptoms


-per Toolkit w/OCHD approval

  • 10 Days from PCR COVID-19 positive test 


COVID-19 Positive (antigen test, no symptoms, no known close contact)


-per Toolkit w/OCHD approval

  • Will be handled on a case by case basis by the Orange County Health Department

  • School administrator and nurse will consult with Lead Nurse, Tracy Sanders

COVID-19 Positive with symptoms (antigen or PCR test)


-per Toolkit w/OCHD approval

  • 10 Days since the first day of symptoms

AND

  • 24 hours since fever (w/o fever reducing medication)

AND

  • Other symptoms of COVID-19 are improving

Symptoms - No test, No health care provider visit


-per Toolkit w/OCHD approval

  • The person completes 10 days of isolation. Isolation should begin starting from the first day of symptoms; 

AND

  • It has been at least 24 hours since the person had a fever (without using fever reducing medicine) 

AND 

  • Other symptoms of COVID-19 are improving

Symptoms, Alternate Diagnosis


-per Toolkit w/OCHD approval

  • Can return to school when the student/staff member receives their alternate diagnosis from their primary care provider.

AND

  • It has been at least 24 hours since the person had a fever (without using fever reducing medicine) 

AND

  • Has felt well for at least 24 hours

Close Contact


-per Toolkit w/OCHD approval

  • 14 Days from last contact (OCHD)

  • 14 days begin after the last known close contact with the COVID-19 positive case


Close Contact - Fully Vaccinated, no symptoms


-per CDC w/OCHD approval

Still need can report to work if:

  • Are fully vaccinated (i.e., at least 2 weeks after getting their second dose in a 2-dose series or one-dose of a single-dose series)

  • Have had no symptoms from when they were exposed to someone with COVID-19

  • Live outside of a group setting. Individuals in group settings such as group homes, jails, etc., still need to quarantine following an exposure.

Close Contact - Fully Vaccinated, w/symptoms


-per CDC w/OCHD approval

  • 14 Days quarantine

  • 14 days begin after the last known close contact with the COVID-19 positive

Household Members (siblings) COVID-19 Positive

  • 14 Days from last contact (OCHD)

  • 14 days begin after the last known close contact with the COVID-19 positive case


Household Members (siblings) Symptoms

  • 14 Days from last contact (OCHD)

  • 14 days begin after the last known close contact with the COVID-19 positive case

  • May return IF the symptomatic student tests negative for COVID-10

  • May return IF the symptomatic student gets an alternative diagnosis from their primary care provider



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