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Math


6th Grade

7th Grade

8th Grade

Laiken Baillie

Laiken_Baillie@ccpsnet.net


Michael Blankenship

Micheal_Blankenship@ccpsnet.net


Emily Owens

emily_owens@ccpsnet.net

Marie Christopherson

Marie_Christopherson@ccpsnet.net

Jessica Day

Jessica_Day@ccpsnet.net

 


Lakeisha Reid

Lakeisha_Reid@ccpsnet.net

Sherrilyn Midgette 

sherrilyn_midgette@ccpsnet.net

Christina McClure

christina_mcclure@ccpsnet.net

Katherine Sikes

katherine_sikes@ccpsnet.net

Amanda Hale

amanda_Hale@ccpsnet.net  

Theodore Johnson 

theodorev_johnson@ccpsnet.net

Tanner Perkins

Tanner_perkins@ccpsnet.net



Requested Math Course Supplies


6th Grade

7th Grade

8th Grade

  • 2 composition notebooks

  • 2 highlighters

  • 2 gluesticks

  • Pencils

  • Colored pencils/markers

  • One binder (to be used for ALL subjects)

  • Subject dividers

  • 1 folder per a class

  • Scissors

  • Dry erase markers

  • Looseleaf paper


-Looseleaf paper

-Pencils

-Highlighters

-Gluesticks

-Scissors

-Earbuds

- 1 pack of multi-colored pens

-Dry erase markers


-1 binder/notebook for Math

-Looseleaf paper

-Dry erase markers

-Graph paper

-Earbuds

-Highlighters

-1 pack of colored markers/pencils







Math 6 Course Description

The sixth-grade standards are a transition from the emphasis placed on whole number arithmetic in the elementary grades to foundations of algebra. The standards emphasize rational numbers. Students will use ratios to compare data sets; recognize decimals, fractions, and percents as ratios; solve single-step and multistep problems, using rational numbers; and gain a foundation in the understanding of integers. Students will solve linear equations and use algebraic terminology. Students will solve problems involving area, perimeter, and surface area, work with π (pi), and focus on the relationships among the properties of quadrilaterals. In addition, students will focus on applications of probability and statistics.

While learning mathematics, students will be actively engaged, using concrete materials and appropriate technology such as calculators, computers, and spreadsheets. However, facility in the use of technology shall not be regarded as a substitute for a student’s understanding of quantitative concepts and relationships or for proficiency in basic computations. Students will also identify real-life applications of the mathematical principles they are learning and apply these to science and other disciplines they are studying.

Mathematics has its own language, and the acquisition of specialized vocabulary and language patterns is crucial to a student’s understanding and appreciation of the subject. Students should be encouraged to use correctly the concepts, skills, symbols, and vocabulary identified in the following set of standards.

Problem solving has been integrated throughout the six content strands. The development of problem-solving skills should be a major goal of the mathematics program at every grade level. Instruction in the process of problem solving will need to be integrated early and continuously into each student’s mathematics education. Students must be helped to develop a wide range of skills and strategies for solving a variety of problem types.






Math 6 Honors and Honors Institute Course Description

The 6th grade honors and honors institute students will focus on seventh-grade standards.  The seventh-grade standards continue to emphasize the foundations of algebra. Students who successfully complete the seventh-grade standards should be prepared to study Algebra I in grade eight. Topics in grade seven include proportional reasoning, integer computation, solving two-step linear equations, and recognizing different representations for relationships. Students will apply the properties of real numbers in solving equations, solve inequalities, and use data analysis techniques to make inferences, conjectures, and predictions.

While learning mathematics, students will be actively engaged, using concrete materials and appropriate technology such as calculators, computers, and spreadsheets. However, facility in the use of technology shall not be regarded as a substitute for a student’s understanding of quantitative concepts and relationships or for proficiency in basic computations. Students will also identify real-life applications of the mathematical principles they are learning and apply these to science and other disciplines they are studying.

Mathematics has its own language, and the acquisition of specialized vocabulary and language patterns is crucial to a student’s understanding and appreciation of the subject. Students should be encouraged to use correctly the concepts, skills, symbols, and vocabulary identified in the following set of standards.

Problem solving has been integrated throughout the six content strands. The development of problem-solving skills should be a major goal of the mathematics program at every grade level. Instruction in the process of problem solving will need to be integrated early and continuously into each student’s mathematics education. Students must be helped to develop a wide range of skills and strategies for solving a variety of problem types.



Math 7 Course Description

The seventh-grade standards continue to emphasize the foundations of algebra. Students who successfully complete the seventh-grade standards should be prepared to study Algebra I in grade eight. Topics in grade seven include proportional reasoning, integer computation, solving two-step linear equations, and recognizing different representations for relationships. Students will apply the properties of real numbers in solving equations, solve inequalities, and use data analysis techniques to make inferences, conjectures, and predictions.

While learning mathematics, students will be actively engaged, using concrete materials and appropriate technology such as calculators, computers, and spreadsheets. However, facility in the use of technology shall not be regarded as a substitute for a student’s understanding of quantitative concepts and relationships or for proficiency in basic computations. Students will also identify real-life applications of the mathematical principles they are learning and apply these to science and other disciplines they are studying.

Mathematics has its own language, and the acquisition of specialized vocabulary and language patterns is crucial to a student’s understanding and appreciation of the subject. Students should be encouraged to use correctly the concepts, skills, symbols, and vocabulary identified in the following set of standards.

Problem solving has been integrated throughout the six content strands. The development of problem-solving skills should be a major goal of the mathematics program at every grade level. Instruction in the process of problem solving will need to be integrated early and continuously into each student’s mathematics education. Students must be helped to develop a wide range of skills and strategies for solving a variety of problem types.



Math 7 Honors and Honors Institute Course Description

The eighth-grade standards are intended to serve two purposes. First, the standards contain content that reviews or extends concepts and skills learned in previous grades. Second, they contain new content that prepares students for more abstract concepts in algebra and geometry. The eighth-grade standards provide students additional instruction and time to acquire the concepts and skills necessary for success in Algebra I. Students will gain proficiency in computation with rational numbers and will use proportions to solve a variety of problems. New concepts include solving multistep equations and inequalities, graphing linear equations, visualizing three-dimensional shapes represented in two-dimensional drawings, and applying transformations to geometric shapes in the coordinate plane. Students will verify and apply the Pythagorean Theorem and represent relations and functions, using tables, graphs, and rules. The eighth-grade standards provide a more solid foundation in Algebra I for those students not ready for Algebra I in grade eight.

While learning mathematics, students will be actively engaged, using concrete materials and appropriate technologies. However, facility in the use of technology shall not be regarded as a substitute for a student’s understanding of quantitative concepts and relationships or for proficiency in basic computations. Students will also identify real-life applications of the mathematical principles they are learning that can be applied to science and other disciplines they are studying.

Mathematics has its own language, and the acquisition of specialized vocabulary and language patterns is crucial to a student’s understanding and appreciation of the subject. Students should be encouraged to use correctly the concepts, skills, symbols, and vocabulary identified in the following set of standards.

Problem solving has been integrated throughout the six content strands. The development of problem-solving skills should be a major goal of the mathematics program at every grade level. Instruction in the process of problem solving will need to be integrated early and continuously into each student’s mathematics education. Students must be helped to develop a wide range of skills and strategies for solving a variety of problem types.


This course culminates with the Grade 8 SOL Mathematics Test.



Math 8/Algebra Prep Course Description

The eighth-grade standards are intended to serve two purposes. First, the standards contain content that reviews or extends concepts and skills learned in previous grades. Second, they contain new content that prepares students for more abstract concepts in algebra and geometry. The eighth-grade standards provide students additional instruction and time to acquire the concepts and skills necessary for success in Algebra I. Students will gain proficiency in computation with rational numbers and will use proportions to solve a variety of problems. New concepts include solving multistep equations and inequalities, graphing linear equations, visualizing three-dimensional shapes represented in two-dimensional drawings, and applying transformations to geometric shapes in the coordinate plane. Students will verify and apply the Pythagorean Theorem and represent relations and functions, using tables, graphs, and rules. The eighth-grade standards provide a more solid foundation in Algebra I for those students not ready for Algebra I in grade eight.

While learning mathematics, students will be actively engaged, using concrete materials and appropriate technologies. However, facility in the use of technology shall not be regarded as a substitute for a student’s understanding of quantitative concepts and relationships or for proficiency in basic computations. Students will also identify real-life applications of the mathematical principles they are learning that can be applied to science and other disciplines they are studying.

Mathematics has its own language, and the acquisition of specialized vocabulary and language patterns is crucial to a student’s understanding and appreciation of the subject. Students should be encouraged to use correctly the concepts, skills, symbols, and vocabulary identified in the following set of standards.

Problem solving has been integrated throughout the six content strands. The development of problem-solving skills should be a major goal of the mathematics program at every grade level. Instruction in the process of problem solving will need to be integrated early and continuously into each student’s mathematics education. Students must be helped to develop a wide range of skills and strategies for solving a variety of problem types.


Algebra 1 Course Description

The standards below outline the content for a one-year course in Algebra I. All students are expected to achieve the Algebra I standards. When planning for instruction, consideration will be given to the sequential development of concepts and skills by using concrete materials to assist students in making the transition from the arithmetic to the symbolic. Students should be helped to make connections and build relationships between algebra and arithmetic, geometry, and probability and statistics. Connections also should be made to other subject areas through practical applications. This approach to teaching algebra should help students attach meaning to the abstract concepts of algebra.

These standards require students to use algebra as a tool for representing and solving a variety of practical problems. Tables and graphs will be used to interpret algebraic expressions, equations, and inequalities and to analyze behaviors of functions.

Graphing calculators, computers, and other appropriate technology tools will be used to assist in teaching and learning. Graphing utilities enhance the understanding of functions; they provide a powerful tool for solving and verifying solutions to equations and inequalities.

Throughout the course, students should be encouraged to engage in discourse about mathematics with teachers and other students, use the language and symbols of mathematics in representations and communication, discuss problems and problem solving, and develop confidence in themselves as mathematics students.


This is an SOL course (given in May) and counts for High School Credit (reports for high school GPA).


Geometry Course Description

This course includes, among other things, properties of geometric figures, trigonometric relationships, and reasoning to justify conclusions.  Methods of justification will include paragraph proofs, two-column proofs, indirect proofs, coordinate proofs, algebraic methods, and verbal arguments. A gradual development of formal proof will be encouraged. Inductive and intuitive approaches to proof as well as deductive axiomatic methods should be used.  This set of standards includes emphasis on two- and three-dimensional reasoning skills, coordinate and transformational geometry, and the use of geometric models to solve problems. A variety of applications and some general problem-solving techniques, including algebraic skills, should be used to implement these standards. Calculators, computers, graphing utilities (graphing calculators or computer graphing simulators), dynamic geometry software, and other appropriate technology tools will be used to assist in teaching and learning. Any technology that will enhance student learning should be used.  

This is an SOL course (given in May) and counts for High School Credit (reports for high school GPA).