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Social Studies

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 Mr. Mann
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Ms. Marcellin
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Mrs. Samuel

It is often said that those who do not know their past are doomed to repeat it. The Carver Academy social studies department seeks to inspire students to examine their past for the wisdom to lead us into the future.

Through courses such as World History, U.S. History, Government, and Sociology, students will explore how the roots of civilization and human nature have shaped the present day. Students will practice the skills of an historian through research into primary sources and digital databases. They will be challenged to build their skills in communication and encouraged to critically question current events

Courses

World History I
This program will build on the basic historical, geographic, political, and economic concepts presented in the K-8 program. The diversity of culture and the evolution of human history will be explored chronologically from the beginning of time until the Renaissance in Europe. Geographical concepts will be included within the context of world historical events.

Honors students will examine the development of the world's major political, economic, and legal systems; artistic and literary movements; technological changes; trade patterns; religions; and the influential people of history. Special emphasis will be given to the five themes of geography as they relate to regional conflicts, humanity's relationships with the environment, and the foundation of democratic principles, such as citizenship. Hands-on activities and the use of available technology will be an integral part of this course. Students will critique analytical essays and continue to learn the research writing process. This course stresses complex critical thinking and problem solving.

World History II
Students in this course will build on the basic historical, geographic, political, and economic concepts presented to them in the first year of the program. The diversity of culture and the evolution of human history will be explored chronologically and geographically from the Renaissance to the present. Geographical concepts will be incorporated within the context of world historical events. 

Honors students will examine the development of the world's major political, economic, and legal systems; artistic and literary movements; technological changes; trade patterns; religions; and the influential people of history. Special emphasis will be given to the five themes of geography as they relate to regional conflicts, humanity's relationships with the environment, and the foundation of democratic principles, such as citizenship. Hands-on activities and the use of available technology will be an integral part of this course. Students will critique analytical essays and continue to learn the research writing process. This course stresses complex critical thinking and problem solving.

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Virginia and United States History
This course will chronicle the history of the United States from the first European exploration of the Americas to the present. Individuals and groups which contributed to the unique evolution of the United States will be studied. Both domestic and foreign policies will be examined at various points in time as the United States developed into a democratic world power. While focusing on political and economic history, this course will include a study of the American culture. 

In Honors-level classes, document based questions will encourage students to refine their critical thinking skills and write better analytical, reflective, and evaluative essays. Students will also synthesize information about national and international political and economic movements as well as historical personages. As part of this program, debates will center on important issues faced by the U.S. and will require students to apply, synthesize, and evaluate the impact of the U.S. on world affairs. In addition to tests and quizzes, students will write analytical essays. Students will continue to learn the research writing process by using additional elements of research in a paper. Other student projects should include several of the following: book reviews, oral presentations/projects, debates, simulations, biographical sketches, and political cartoons. The purpose of these products is to enable students to develop the ability to demonstrate more complex critical thinking and problem solving skills.  Honors students who successfully complete this course will receive 6 transfer level college credits from John Tyler Community College.

Virginia and United States Government
The curriculum examines the structure and functions of our federal form of government. The decision-making processes at the local, state, national, and international levels are emphasized. The foundations of American government, the politics of American democracy, and constitutional rights and responsibilities are explored in depth. United States political and economic systems are compared to those of other nations, with emphasis on the relationships between economic and political freedoms. Economic content includes the United States market system, supply and demand, and the role of the government in the economy. Democratic values and citizen participation are stressed throughout the course. 

In addition to regular evaluation, Honors students will write one or more position papers and/or a research paper. Other student projects should include several of the following items: book reviews, mock trials, U.N. simulations, political cartoons, debates, court briefs, and written/oral summaries of legislative issues. The purpose of these projects is to enable students to develop the skills necessary to demonstrate more complex critical thinking and problem solving. Honors students who successfully complete this course will receive 6 transfer level college credits from John Tyler Community College.

Sociology
The goal of the sociology curriculum is to provide the background and framework for students to better understand their roles in society and the effects of various groups' actions and interactions on society. As students study American society, they incorporate many of the concepts learned in other disciplines of social studies such as responsibilities; rights; cause and effect; choices and their impact; the importance of communication, organizations, relationships, and the major American cultural institutions. This new application of traditional social studies skills and concepts provides a valuable awareness and insight into the general importance of and need for a broad understanding of the social studies.

Honors students are also presented with significant research and theory in areas such as socialization, group dynamics, gender roles, minority group relations, stratification, deviance, culture, and community studies. Includes population, social change, and social institutions: family, education, religion, political system, and economic systems. Honors students who successfully complete this course will receive 6 transfer level college credits from John Tyler Community College.

AP Human Geography
The AP Human Geography course introduces students to the field of academic geography. Emphasis will be placed on geographic concepts of location, space, place, scale, pattern, regionalization and globalization. Students will develop an understanding of human interaction, demographic change, environmental affects, and economic impacts on the world.