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#OneSentenceBookReview

posted May 31, 2015, 5:45 PM by nking@bsusd.net


The Library Tweets, Therefore It Is

posted May 31, 2015, 11:59 AM by nking@bsusd.net

The Library is now on Twitter! Follow @LibraryBSHS to find out what's here and what's coming soon and tell us what you'd like to see here.

New Book Spotlight

posted May 12, 2015, 11:21 AM by nking@bsusd.net   [ updated May 12, 2015, 11:23 AM ]

Vango: Between Sky and Earth by Timothée de Fombelle (FIC FOM)

            Yet another example of the current wave of excellent historical fiction, Vango is a captivating mystery novel in the classical sense, set in interwar Europe and weaving between various timelines involving players in the rising powers that would soon ignite the second great conflict but focusing on a paranoiac Sicilian seminarian with a past full of unanswered questions and an international warrant out for his arrest. Fombelle masterfully employs layers of flashbacks, an ensemble cast of almost-historical figures (i.e. the commander of the storied Graf Zeppelin and the unacknowledged daughter of Josef Stalin) and more border-hopping than a summer with Rick Steves to create the kind of cinematic experience that old Hollywood aspired to and new Hollywood has given up on. Don’t miss it. 

Digital Resource

posted May 12, 2015, 11:21 AM by nking@bsusd.net

Last year the New York Times compiled over a hundred years of census data to track migration within the U.S. easy to understand charts show either where people where leaving for or coming from over time state by state. This wealth of information is, in addition to being objectively fascinating, potentially enlightening in discussions of any number of national issues.

http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2014/08/13/upshot/where-people-in-each-state-were-born.html?_r=1&abt=0002&abg=0#Michigan

Digital Resource

posted Apr 20, 2015, 9:54 AM by nking@bsusd.net

     Research is a huge part of the CCSS, and an important part of research that should be instilled in students early and often is source management. Knowing how to cite sources and avoid plagiarism becomes increasingly essential as students prepare for higher education. With this in mind the ALA has assembled a veritable Swiss army knife of copyright tools on one page (http://www.ala.org/advocacy/copyright-tools). Your students may not be likely to seriously violate any intellectual property at this point in their academic careers, but these tools offer an opportunity to teach them that these restrictions, and their consequences, are very real. 

Scholastic Book Fair

posted Apr 13, 2015, 1:06 PM by nking@bsusd.net   [ updated Apr 13, 2015, 1:06 PM ]

            The library will be hosting a Scholastic book fair May 4th through the 8th to raise money to further update our collection and get our kids reading! In addition to the on campus sales that week we will have online sales open April 29th through May 12th. The books will be primarily middle-school level though they will include many of the current popular YA series as well. I have catalogues available in the library now and will begin to distribute them in the coming week. Please let me know if you have any questions and I will keep you updated as the date approaches.

New Book Spotlight

posted Mar 30, 2015, 10:38 AM by nking@bsusd.net

Half a World Away by Cynthia Kadohata (FIC KAD)

            Amongst middle grade authors Kadohata has a reputation for taking on potentially touchy issues with grace to create complex, relatable characters. Here she does not disappoint. Jaden is a deeply troubled kid: angry, obsessive, convinced of his own inadequacy. All of this exacerbated by his family’s journey to Kazakhstan to adopt a child; he is convinced it is to replace him. But when he begins to bond with one of the children being considered, a toddler with special needs who seems unlikely to be chosen by anyone, unexpected, though not unrealistic growth occurs. This messy, very human story is not sugar-coated, and I think that honesty is what makes it work for readers at any level.

Digital Resource

posted Mar 30, 2015, 10:36 AM by nking@bsusd.net

    ReadWriteThink (http://www.readwritethink.org/) has a wide variety of free interactive programs for students, organized by grade level and subject. A particular highlight is their Essay Map (http://www.readwritethink.org/classroom-resources/student-interactives/essay-30063.html) which allows students to easily rearrange and organize aspects of their topic that they have identified, like a dynamic outline. They offer similar programs for poetry and drama formats, as well as exercises in close reading, grammar and vocabulary. These could be used to supplement assignments or as an excellent test prep regimen.

New Book Spotlight

posted Mar 23, 2015, 11:32 AM by nking@bsusd.net

The Turtle of Oman by Naomi Shihab Nye (FIC NYE)

            This brief, poetically written novel is a shining example of economy of expression. The story of a boy and his grandfather preparing for the boy’s move to America with his family, collecting memories of the country he cannot imagine leaving, it takes on the anxiety of life’s unavoidable changes that we’re all familiar with. Variations on this narrative have been told many times but there’s nothing clichéd or cloying here, no sermonizing by the wise elder or fortune cookie platitudes, just a deep sense of empathy and genuinely undramatic acceptance.

Digital Resource

posted Mar 23, 2015, 11:31 AM by nking@bsusd.net

Check out CODE (http://code.org/) for a variety of simple activities, both online and off, introducing the basics of coding. Computer science is quickly becoming a foundational subject for ongoing success and integrating it into any curriculum immediately adds relevance and practical applications.

            

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