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April 2014

posted Apr 11, 2014, 6:19 AM by Tammy Mamayek

This email is a service offered to you by the American Academy of Ophthalmology.April 2014 
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Norm Abram

Learn about what to expect when you visit your ophthalmologist for acomprehensive eye exam.

Let's Move
Get up and get moving this Spring! This curriculum guide teaches kids how your eyes benefit from exercise too (pdf).
Roberto Garza
Order this DVD about preventing vision loss from diabetes, featuring Chicago Bears player Roberto Garza.
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EYESMART NEWS 
VOL. 8, ISSUE 4



Protect Your Eyes to Stay in the Game
Protect Your EyesCoaches, parents and athletes: be sure to use the right protective eyewear! Of the 100,000 eye injuries resulting from sports each year, an estimated 42,000 people are treated in emergency rooms and 13,500 end up legally blind. In addition, every 13 minutes, an emergency room treats a sports-related eye injury. The good news? An estimated 90 percent of sports-related eye injuries can be prevented by using protective eyewear.

Want to spread the word about sports eye injuries? Check out EyeSmart’s new infographic, Sports Eye Injuries by the Numbers, and share it with your friends.

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Lifestyle Changes May Decrease Risk of Vision Impairment 
New research has found that regular physical activity and an alcoholic beverage every now and then may be associated with a lower risk of visual impairment. Learn more about lifestyle changes that may change your risk for vision impairment.

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Learn Your Risk for Eye Disease During Minority Health Month
April is National Minority Health Month. Just as age, family history and gender can be risk factors for certain eye diseases, your ethnicity can put you at risk as well. Find out which ethnicities are at higher risk for eye diseases like glaucoma and diabetic retinopathy, and learn more about EyeCare America, a national public service program that provides qualifying seniors with eye exams at no out-of-pocket cost.  

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Allergy Alert: Tips to Soothe Your Itchy, Red Eyes
As the snow melts and the trees and flowers bloom, spring means the beginning of allergy season for many people. Get important tips to combat those red, itchy eyes this April! 

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Ask an Eye M.D. 
Have a question for our ophthalmologists? Submit your eye health questions ongeteyesmart.org.

Question of the month: Can a fracture in my eye socket be fixed?

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EYESMART SOCIAL MEDIA 

Are you one of EyeSmart’s 13,000 friends on Facebook or 5,000 followers on Twitter yet? Well, what are you waiting for? Join the discussion today.




COMING UP NEXT MONTH

May is U.V. Safety Month
Share pictures on our Facebook and Twitter pages of you out and about in the sun wearing your favorite shades! And be sure to visit our Facebook page throughout May to enter to win a pair of TOMS sunglasses or other great prizes.

EyeSmart Health Observances:

January– Glaucoma Awareness Month
February – Age-Related Macular Degeneration Awareness Month
March - Workplace Eye Wellness Month
April – Sports Eye Safety & National Minority Health Month 
May – Healthy Vision & U.V. Safety Month
June – Cataract Awareness & Fireworks Eye Safety Month
July
 – Celebrate Senior Independence Month 
August – Children’s Eye Health & Safety Month
September – Healthy Aging Month
October – Eye Injury Prevention & Halloween Safety Month
November – Diabetic Eye Disease Awareness Month
December – Safe Toys & Celebrations Month

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April 3, 2014

posted Apr 3, 2014, 7:20 AM by Tammy Mamayek

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Fewer than 1 in 10 U.S. Women Know That Women Are at Greater Risk of Permanent Vision Loss Than Men– According to New National Survey
 
Milwaukee, WI (March 31, 2014) - A new national survey has revealed that only 9 percent of American women realize that women are at a greater risk of suffering permanent vision loss than men. Eighty-six percent incorrectly believe that men and women are at equal risk, and five percent believe that men are at greater risk.  This survey was conducted online within the United States by Harris Poll on behalf of Prevent Blindness from January 24th – 28th, 2014 among 2,039 U.S. adults ages 18 and older.
 
“These responses indicate an alarming lack of knowledge regarding women’s vision,” said Prevent Blindness volunteer adviser and spokesperson Dr. Mildred M.G. Olivier, a leading expert on women and minority eye health.  “It’s apparent that a vast majority of women are unaware of the gender specific symptoms, conditions and risks associated with vision health.”
 
Prevent Blindness sponsored the survey to gain insight into the public’s perceptions about women's eye and vision health.   The group is releasing the data as part of April’s Women’s Eye Health and Safety Month to promote the importance of educating women about the vision related symptoms, conditions and treatments unique to them. 
 
Data illustrating women’s prevalence of major vision disorders is available in the 2012 study entitled Vision Problems in the US.  This studies shows that in Wisconsin, 68 percent of those experiencing blindness are women, 60 percent of those with cataracts are women and 67 percent of those with Age-Related Macular Degeneration are women.
 
To address these issues, Prevent Blindness has created a new program, See Jane See: Women’s Healthy Eyes Now, to provide free education and resources on everything from eye disease to cosmetic safety to vision changes during pregnancy. 
 
“It is imperative that we inform women about protecting their vision today in order to save sight for tomorrow,” said Barbara Armstrong, Executive Director of Prevent Blindness Wisconsin.  “Through the See Jane See program, we are able to provide a place where women can find current news and invaluable information that is dedicated specifically to women and their needs.”
 
For more information about the survey, including informative reports and fact sheets that address a wide range of eye health and safety topics, please visit SeeJaneSee.org, or contact Prevent Blindness Wisconsin at (414) 765-0505 or info@preventblindnesswisconsin.org.
 
Survey Methodology
This survey was conducted online within the United States by Harris Interactive on behalf of Prevent Blindness from January 24-28, 2014 among 2,039 adults ages 18 and older. This online survey is not based on a probability sample and therefore no estimate of theoretical sampling error can be calculated.
 
About Prevent Blindness Wisconsin 
Prevent Blindness Wisconsin is a non-profit volunteer organization, founded in 1958, and an affiliate of Prevent Blindness. Our mission is to prevent blindness and preserve sight in Wisconsin. We serve the state by promoting healthy vision and eye safety through free vision screenings, information and referral services, and public and professional education. http://wwwpreventblindness.org/wi.
 
Copyright © 2014 Prevent Blindness Wisconsin, All rights reserved. 
You are receiving this email because you are friends of Prevent Blindness Wisconsin 
Our mailing address is: 
Prevent Blindness Wisconsin
759 N. Milwaukee Street
Suite 305
Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53202

Add us to your address book


CDC Announces Change in Autism Prevalance

posted Apr 1, 2014, 7:26 AM by Tammy Mamayek


Autism SocietyLike us on Facebook
CDC ANNOUNCES CHANGE IN AUTISM PREVALANCE
March 27, 2014

 

30% INCREASE IN AUTISM RATE

 

The Centers for Disease Control in Atlanta announced today that the now estimate that 1 in 68 children has an autism spectrum disorder.  Autism continues to be almost 5 times as common in boys: 1 in 42 boys vs 1 in 189 girls.   

 

Read  CDC press release here. 

 

Wisconsin is one state where this information is collected. For how this data was collected  Wisconsin and Wisconsin-specific data, see this document from the Waisman Center. 

 

 

 


3720 N. 124th Street, Suite O, Wauwatosa, WI 53222 * 414-988-1260 *
Office hours: Monday through Thursday 9:00 a.m.-3:00 p.m. CST
Fridays by appointment 

Preventing work eyestrain

posted Mar 18, 2014, 6:14 AM by Tammy Mamayek

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Seeing Well, Work Well: Reducing Digital Eyestrain and other Workplace Vision Hazards

Milwaukee, WI (Feb. 26, 2014) – As the use of digital devices continues to increase, the impact of prolonged usage can often be felt in the eye.  Because of the extended use of these devices, close to 70 percent of American adults experience some form of digital eyestrain, according to a report from The Vision Council.  Symptoms of digital eyestrain can include dry eyes, blurred vision and headaches.

To highlight the central role computers and smartphones play in the modern workforce, Prevent Blindness Wisconsin has declared March Workplace Eye Wellness Month.  The goal is to provide employers and employees with free information on topics ranging from eyestrain to industrial eye safety in order to promote eye health at work.

Office workers can take a few simple steps to help prevent eyestrain and fatigue.  Prevent Blindness Wisconsin suggests:
  • Visit an eye doctor for a dilated eye exam to make sure you are seeing clearly and to detect any potential vision issues.
  • Place your screen 20 to 26 inches away from your eyes and a little bit below eye level.
  • Use a document holder placed next to your computer screen. It should be close enough so you don’t have to swing your head back and forth or constantly change your eye focus.
  • Adjust the text size on the screen to a comfortable level.
  • Change your lighting to lower glare and harsh reflections. Glare filters over your computer screen can also help.
  • Use a chair you can adjust.
  • Choose screens that can tilt and swivel. A keyboard that you can adjust is also helpful.
  • The Vision Council recommends the 20-20-20 break:  every 20 minutes, take a 20-second break and look at something 20 feet away.
In addition, Prevent Blindness Wisconsin also strongly recommends the use of eye protection in the workplace, especially in industries such as construction, manufacturing, or any profession where eye accidents and injuries may occur.  The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported that in 2012, there were 20,300 recorded occupational eye injuries that resulted in days away from work. 

Prevent Blindness Wisconsin also offers a workplace program. Eye2Eye, a web-based educational resource that trains employees to communicate the importance of eye health and safety to each other, increases eye safety compliance and builds a stronger culture of safety in the workplace.  The program features a peer-based, interactive curriculum and community-oriented forum enabling end-users to share their learnings and best practices with each other.

“Taking care of our eyes should be a job we perform around the clock,” said Barbara Armstrong, Executive Director of Prevent Blindness Wisconsin.  “By protecting our eyes at work and at home, we can maintain our healthy vision and stay productive for years to come!”
To find out more about Eye2Eye or other workplace eye health topics, please contact Prevent Blindness Wisconsin at (414) 765-0505 or visithttp://wisconsin.preventblindness.org/.
 
About Prevent Blindness Wisconsin 
Prevent Blindness Wisconsin is a non-profit volunteer organization, founded in 1958, and an affiliate of Prevent Blindness. Our mission is to prevent blindness and preserve sight in Wisconsin. We serve the state by promoting healthy vision and eye safety through free vision screenings, information and referral services, and public and professional education. http://wwwpreventblindness.org/wi.
 
Copyright © 2014 Prevent Blindness Wisconsin, All rights reserved. 
You are receiving this email because you are friends of Prevent Blindness Wisconsin 
Our mailing address is: 
Prevent Blindness Wisconsin
759 N. Milwaukee Street
Suite 305
Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53202

Add us to your address book


Looking for Parent Helpers!!

posted Mar 12, 2014, 11:19 AM by Tammy Mamayek

Want To Help?!?

Did you know we have a parent communication committee for PBIS? We are looking for YOU! We need a parent willing to help us learn the best way to communicate with parents/guardians about PBIS! If interested please email Mrs. Montague at AMontague@browndeerschools.com or call at 414-371-6881.

March 11, 2014

posted Mar 11, 2014, 7:05 AM by Tammy Mamayek

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Register Create a Team Event Info Volunteer FAQs Your Impact

NATIONAL WALK FOR EPILEPSY, March 22, 2014

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Register for the 2014 National Walk for Epilepsy

 

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© 2014 Epilepsy Foundation of America

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Age-Related Macular Degeneration and Low Vision

posted Feb 14, 2014, 7:59 AM by Tammy Mamayek

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Prevent Blindness Wisconsin Offers Free Resources to Educate Public on Age-related Macular Degeneration & Low Vision
 
Milwaukee, WI (February 3, 2014) – Today, more than 2 million Americans ages 50and over have age-related macular degeneration (AMD), including more than 40,000 adults over the age of 40 in Wisconsin. AMD is an eye disease that causes central vision to gradually deteriorate. Over time, AMD can lead to low vision and blindness. According to the National Eye Institute, almost 3 million Americans have low vision. Blindness and low vision in the U.S. cost more than $3.7 billion annually, with an annual per-person treatment cost of $6,680, according to the  “Cost of Vision Problems:  The Economic Burden of Vision Loss and Eye Disorders in the United States.
 
To raise awareness of AMD and low vision, Prevent Blindness Wisconsin has declared February as Age-related Macular Degeneration & Low Vision Awareness Month.  Prevent Blindness Wisconsin offers resources on AMD and low vision, including:
 
Living Well with Low Visionlowvision.preventblindness.org is a new online resource offering up-to-date information and free materials for people living with low vision. The mission of Living Well With Low Vision is to make it as easy as possible for people to educate themselves about loss of vision and to meet the daily challenges resulting from it. 
 
AMD Awareness Makes a Difference- Prevent Blindness Wisconsin offers Amsler grid magnets to help raise awareness of AMD.  An Amsler grid is used to monitor a person's central vision and can help identify vision abnormalities linked to AMD. To request a grid with instructions for use, email us at: info@preventblindnesswisconsin.org.
 
Prevent Blindness AMD Learning Center- The AMD Learning Center, found atwisconsin.preventblindness.org/age-related-macular-degeneration-amd, provides a variety of educational tools including AMD risk factors, treatment options, an Adult Vision Risk Assessment tool, fact sheets and more. 
 
See Jane See- More women than men have eye disease, and 65 percent of those diagnosed with AMD are women.  SeeJaneSee.org is a new Prevent Blindness online resource offering free eye health information tailored to women.  
 
“The number of cases of those with AMD, retinal disorders and low vision are growing at an alarming rate,” said Barbara Armstrong, Executive Director of Prevent Blindness Wisconsin.  “Only through education, early detection and treatment can we prevent considerable vision loss.”
 
Making a commitment to maintaining a healthy lifestyle also helps to save sight.  Prevent Blindness Wisconsin recommends:
  • Visit an eye doctor regularly
  • Stop smoking
  • Eat healthy foods, including foods rich in certain antioxidants
  • Stay active
  • Control blood pressure
  • Avoid eye injuries that may cause permanent damage by wearing eye protection during physical activities
  • When outdoors, no matter what time of year, always wear UV-blocking wrap-around sunglasses and a brimmed hat
For more information on AMD, low vision and other eye disease, please contact Prevent Blindness Wisconsin at (414) 765-0505 or visit www.preventblindness.org/wi.

Prevent Blindness Wisconsin - Overview
Founded in 1958 by civic leaders in Milwaukee, including Edmund Fitzgerald, Ralph Harkness, Earl Herslof and John Hitz, Prevent Blindness Wisconsin preserves the gift of sight for Wisconsin’s children and adults. The mission of Prevent Blindness Wisconsin is to prevent blindness and preserve sight by identifying early signs of vision disorders, facilitating early and effective treatment, and preventing eye injury.
 
Copyright © 2014 Prevent Blindness Wisconsin, All rights reserved. 
You are receiving this email because you are friends of Prevent Blindness Wisconsin 
Our mailing address is: 
Prevent Blindness Wisconsin
759 N. Milwaukee Street
Suite 305
Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53202

Add us to your address book


Top ten tips for coping with the Holidays

posted Dec 3, 2013, 7:22 AM by Tammy Mamayek

Top 10 Tips for Coping with the Holidays
It's the most wonderful time of the year! Or is it? The holidays - love them or hate them, they come around every year without fail. From party hosting and hopping, to cooking, baking and eating, to last-minute gift shopping and travel near and far - you're either exhilarated or
exhausted - or both. Check out our Top 10 tips for coping with the holidays so you can (hopefully) relax and enjoy the true magic of the season!
TOP 10 HOLIDAY SURVIVAL TIPS ›

Affordable Care Act

posted Nov 13, 2013, 7:55 AM by Tammy Mamayek

Registration Required.  Register Now

for

WISCONSIN’S STATEWIDE MULTI-CAMPUS

TEACH-IN AND WEBCAST

 

on the

 

Affordable Care Act (ACA)

aka “Obamacare”

and how it affects students and young adults

 

Monday, November 18, 2013

5:00-7:00pm

 

22 Campuses, Expert Speakers, Q&A, Dialogue, and Pizza

 

Speakers Include

Brett Davis, Wisconsin Medicaid Director

Dan Schwartzer, Wisconsin Office of the Commissioner of Insurance

Kathleen Falk, Director, Region V, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
Dr. Sarah Van Orman, Executive Director, University Health Services

 

Where:

UW-Madison Health Sciences Learning Center

and 21 other Wisconsin colleges

 

What’s a Teach-In?

An educational forum on a complicated issue designed to be practical, participatory, and oriented toward action.

 

What’s the focus?

What options are available for affordable health insurance coverage?

What changes to health insurance are relevant to students and young adults?

How does the ACA affect students who are uninsured or currently covered by  Medicaid or BadgerCare?

 

 

 

Follow us on Twitter @AKATeachIn

 

Produced by

UW School of Medicine and Public Health

UW Population Health Institute

Covering Kids and Families, Wisconsin

 

In partnership with

Wisconsin Technical Colleges

UW-Colleges

Wisconsin Union Directorate

                                                                                                                                                                   

Visit the event web page:  http://uwphi.pophealth.wisc.edu/announcements/multi-campus-teach-in-on-the-affordable-care-act.htm
Find background materials here:  http://www.ckfwi.org/specialpopulations.html

Free Coats for Those in Need

posted Oct 28, 2013, 6:35 AM by Tammy Mamayek

If you know of a child in need of a winter coat, the salvation army is giving free coats to children on 11/1/13 at 5880 N 60th Street between 9:00am and noon. Feel free to give this information out to anyone who you believe maybe in need.

 

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