Archaeology and Ancient World




Othmar Pferschy. Pompeipolis. 1936.
General Resources:


Ancient World Digital Library. Initiative of the Institute for the Study of the Ancient World at New York University to digitize scholarly materials related to the ancient world.
 

 
Arachne: Object Database of the German Archaeological Institute and the Archaeological Institute of the University of Cologne.

 
 
Asclepion: webpage of the study of ancient medicine.

 

 
 
Classical Art Research Centre and Beazley Archive, University of Oxford.

Classics and the Ancient World: From the Digital Librarian: "A Librarian's choice of the best of the web."

 

Exhibitions at the Institute for the Study of the Ancient World at New York University. Online images and texts from past and current exhibitions.
 
 
Historic Cities: Maps, literature, documents and more.

Papyri.info: Dedicated to the study of ancient papyrological documents.

Portable Antiquities Scheme. Website to encourage the recording of archaeological finds in England and Wales by the general public. Includes images of objects.

Qantara: Mediterranean Heritage. "Aims to contribute to mutual understanding and dialogue among Mediterranean cultures by highlighting their cultural heritage."

Royal Athena Galleries. Auction site with images of past sales objects. "The world's most extensive selection of fine art of the ancient world."
 



African:



American:

Fort Moultrie May 1860:  3-D digital recreation of the remnants of the 200-year-old Fort Moultrie in Charleston Harbor, South Carolina. Includes pages on history, architecture, and weaponry of the fort, a glossary, videos, and digitized photos and prints.
 
 
Celtic
 

Irish Resources in the Humanities. Includes links to art, architecture and archaeology websites.


Early Christian

Catacomb of Priscilla. Interactive tour of the restored catacomb, on Google Maps.


Early Christian Art source page on Art History Resources website compiled by Dr. Christopher L. C. E. Witcombe of Bryn Mawr College.


Egyptian:

Ancient Egyptian Art source page on Art History Resources website compiled by Dr.  Christopher L. C. E. Witcombe of Bryn Mawr College.
 
APIS: Advanced Papyrological Information System. Information about and images of papyrus related materials.



 
Echoes of Eternity.  Online exhibition about the ancient Egyptian collection at the Nelson-Atkins Museum.


Osirisnet. Site devoted to the tombs and mastabas of ancient Egypt.

Theban Mapping Project. Attempt to prepare a "comprehensive archaeological database of Thebes."


Levant, Mesopotamia, Near East and Mideast:

Aerial Photographic Guide for Archaeology in the Middle East (APAAME). Includes over 70,000 images and maps, principal focus is Jordan.

 
 
Ancient Near East and the Mediterranean World from the University of Chicago Library.
 
Ancient Near East source page on Art History Resources website compiled by Dr. Christopher L. C. E. Witcombe of Bryn Mawr College.

Archives of Middle Eastern Aerial Photographs. Sites compiled by the University of Western Australia School of Humanities.

Assos Online Tour. Turkish site of the Archaeological Institute of America's first excavations.

 
 

Nimrud: Materialities of Assyrian Knowledge Production. Site dedicated to looking at how artefacts from Nimrud made their way to museums around the world.

The Oriental Insitute. Research Archives page. Non-circulating collection of publications relating to the ancient Near East located at the University of Chicago.
 


Greek, Etruscan, and Roman

Ancient Graffiti Project. Site for the study of ancient Roman graffiti from Herculaneum and Pompeii.

Ancient Greek Art source page on Art History Resources website compiled by Dr. Christopher L. C. E. Witcombe of Bryn Mawr College.

Ancient Rome Live. "An immersive journey that provides new perspectives about the ancient city." Includes interactive maps, live streaming and videos.

 
Assos: Online tour of ancient Turkish city.

Capitolium: The official website of the Roman Imperial Forums.


Digitial Hadrian's Villa Project. Includes plans, 3D models, photos, and more.
 

Digital Roman Forum.  From UCLA Cultural Virtual Reality Lab.

Etruscan Art source page on Art History Resources website compiled by Dr. Christopher L. C. E. Witcombe of Bryn Mawr College.

Excavations at Isthmia by the University of Chicago.

40 Maps that Explain the Roman Empire.

A Gallery of Roman Mosaics. A PBS Nova interactive site of mosaics from Zeugma in Turkey.

Hellenic Ministry of Education and Religious Affairs, Culture and Sports. Official information about Greek sites and art.

International Catacomb Society. "Promotes awareness of the need for preservation, restoration, and documentation of  the catacombs of Rome (with a special focus on the Jewish catacombs). Members may access additional resources including an online image archives and bibliographical database."

Nicholas V. Artamonoff Collection. Photographs taken in Istanbul and five archaeological sites in Turkey from 1935-1945. Dumbarton Oaks exhibition.

Panoply: Animating the Ancient World. "We make animations from real ancient Greek vases."

Perseus Digital Library. A venerable digital project about the history, literature and culture of the Greco-Roman world (begun in 1987!).

Le Plan de Rome: Scale Model of Rome.

Roman Baths Museum, Bath, England.

Romans in Britain.


SPQR ND : Interpreting the Roman Forum through Early Architectural Publications. App for iPads and iPhones, from the University of Notre Dame.

William Earl Betsch Photographs of Architectural Capitals in Istanbul. Dumbarton Oaks finding aid to collection concerning late antique capitals.


Prehistoric
 

 

Cave of Lascaux. Fabulous, interactive views of the cave interior. May take a while to download the big images at first.

The Megalithic Portal. Non-scholarly site for fans of ancient megaliths. 

Mildred Barnes and Robert Woods Bliss Correspondence with Kirsopp and Silva Lake. Dumbarton Oaks finding aid to correspondence concerning archaeological expeditions.
 
Prehistoric Art source page on Art History Resources website compiled by Dr. Christopher L. C. E. Witcombe of Bryn Mawr College.


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