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Chemistry Curriculum Vertical Alignment

Because chemistry content appears in a variety of courses in grade 9-12 in Bartlesville, a vertical alignment was established to help prevent duplications and eliminate gaps in coverage.

 

  • 9th Grade Physical Science (and BAHS Physical Science)
  • Chemistry I and Active Chemistry
  • Honors Chemistry I
  • AP Chemistry II

Assigned chemistry topics for 9th Grade Physical Science and Alternative High School Physical Science:

  1. Identify matter according to physical and chemical properties and its phase.
    Investigate physical and chemical changes (change of state, change of particle size, and dissolving). Indications of chemical change (color, temperature, gas precipitate).
    Identify properties of acids, bases, and salts.
    Determine formulas for acids and bases.
  2. Investigate the concept of conservation of mass.
  3. Use the periodic table to obtain information about symbols, atomic number and mass, chemical families, and physical and chemical properties.
    Experiment with the differences between metals, nonmetals, and metalloids.
  4. Balance equations using the proper subscripts and coefficients and identify the reactants and products.
  5. Investigate the composition and properties of elements, compounds, and mixtures. Perform physical separations.
  6. Use physical and mental models to develop models of atomic and molecular structure. Include the properties of the electron, proton, and neutron; attraction of unlike charges, covalent and ionic bonding. (Do not use quantum theory, such as s, p, d, f orbitals.)

 

Assigned chemistry topics for Chemistry I and Active Chemistry:

  1. Investigate classes of matter and their properties by studying:
    endothermic and exothermic reactions
    heat of formation (calculation in AP Chemistry II)
  2. Describe atomic models:
    s, p, d, f orbitals
    isotopes
    average atomic mass
    electron configurations
    relate atomic model to the Periodic Table
  3. Interpret chemical bonding in terms of electrostatic force:
    electronegativity (and AP Chemistry II)
    ionization energy (and AP Chemistry II)
    electron affinity (and AP Chemistry II)
    prediction of molecular polarity (and AP Chemistry II)
    atomic and ionic radii
  4. Balance chemical equations:
    know monatomic and polyatomic ions
    nomenclature
    empirical formulas
    types of reactions
  5. Quantitative solving of chemical problems:
    mole concept
    mass-mass
    molecular weight
    percentage composition
    Avogadro's Principle
    mass-volume
    volume-volume
    molar solutions
    limiting reactants
  6. Identify the characteristics of oxidation and reduction reactions.
  7. Investigate the practical applications of electrolytes and characteristics of electrolytes.
  8. Investigate chemical equilibrium:
    LeChatelier's Principle (quantitative in AP Chemistry II)
    factors affecting equilibrium
    characteristics of acid-base reactions
    formulas for acids and bases
    strengths of acids and bases (qualitative)
  9. Relate the behavior of matter to the kinetic molecular theory:
    assumptions of the kinetic theory
    effect on the phases of matter (Honors Chemistry I and AP Chemistry II: study phase diagrams)
    effect of temperature and pressure on molecular motion
  10. Study nuclear energy:
    half-life
    subatomic particles related to nuclear chemistry
    practical applications of nuclear energy
    nuclear equations dealing with transmutations
    fission and fusion reactions
  11. Investigate the behavior of gases and use Boyle's Law, Charles' Law, and the combined gas laws to solve written problems.
  12. Investigate organic compounds:
    nomenclature
    properties and uses
    isomers
  13. Use mathematical skills to:
    solve equations with one unknown quantity
    use significant digits and scientific notation
    apply correct formulas to the interpretation of word problems

 

Assigned chemistry topics for Honors Chemistry I:

  1. Identify matter according to physical and chemical properties and its phase.
    Investigate physical and chemical changes (change of state, change of particle size, and dissolving).
    Indications of chemical change (color, temperature, gas precipitate).
    Identify properties of acids, bases, and salts.
    Determine formulas for acids and bases.
  2. Investigate the concept of conservation of mass.
  3. Use the periodic table to obtain information about symbols, atomic number and mass, chemical families, and physical and chemical properties.
    Experiment with the differences between metals, nonmetals, and metalloids.
  4. Investigate the composition and properties of elements, compounds, and mixtures.
    Perform physical separations.
  5. Investigate classes of matter and their properties by studying:
    endothermic and exothermic reactions
    heat of formation (calculation in AP Chemistry II)
  6. Describe atomic models:
    s, p, d, f orbitals
    isotopes
    average atomic mass
    electron configurations
    relate atomic model to the Periodic Table
  7. Interpret chemical bonding in terms of electrostatic force:
    properties of the electron, proton, and neutron
    covalent and ionic bonding
    electronegativity (and AP Chemistry II)
    ionization energy (and AP Chemistry II)
    electron affinity (and AP Chemistry II)
    prediction of molecular polarity (and Chem II)
    atomic and ionic radii
  8. Balance chemical equations:
    know monatomic and polyatomic ions
    nomenclature
    empirical formulas
    types of reactions
  9. Quantitative solving of chemical problems:
    mole concept
    mass-mass
    molecular weight
    percentage composition
    Avogadro's Principle
    mass-volume
    volume-volume
    molar solutions
    limiting reactants
  10. Investigate the practical applications of electrolytes and characteristics of electrolytes.
  11. Relate the behavior of matter to the kinetic molecular theory:
    assumptions of the kinetic theory
    effect on the phases of matter
    study phase diagrams (and AP Chemistry II)
    effect of temperature and pressure on molecular motion
  12. Investigate the behavior of gases and use Boyle's Law, Charles' Law, and the combined gas laws to solve written problems.
  13. Investigate organic compounds:
    nomenclature
    properties and uses
    isomers
  14. Use mathematical skills to:
    solve equations with one unknown quantity
    use significant digits and scientific notation
    apply correct formulas to the interpretation of word problems

 

The following topics are assigned to but reportedly not regularly completed in this course:

  • Identify the characteristics of oxidation and reduction reactions.
  • Investigate chemical equilibrium:
    LeChatelier's Principle (quantitative in AP Chemistry II)
    factors affecting equilibrium
    characteristics of acid-base reactions
    formulas for acids and bases
    strengths of acids and bases (qualitative)
  • Study nuclear energy:
    half-life
    subatomic particles related to nuclear chemistry
    practical applications of nuclear energy
    nuclear equations dealing with transmutations
    fission and fusion reactions
  •  

    Assigned chemistry topics for AP Chemistry II:

    1. Describe current atomic models.
    2. Interpret chemical bonding in terms of electrostatic force.
      electronegativity
      ionization energy
      electron affinity
      valence bond theory
      valence shell electron pair repulsion theory
      prediction of molecular shapes
      prediction of molecular polarity
    3. Balance chemical equations.
      nomenclature
      half reactions
      net ionic equations
    4. Identify oxidation-reduction equations:
      determine oxidation numbers
      balance redox equations
      oxidizing and reducing agents
    5. Investigate practical applications of electrochemistry.
      chemical conductivity
      types of electrochemical cells (voltaic and electrolytic)
      calculation of emf
    6. Investigate chemical equilibrium.
      LeChatelier's Principle (quantitatively)
      factors affecting equilibrium
      strengths of acids and bases (quantitatively)
      equilibrium constants
    7. Kinetic molecular theory and phase diagrams.
    8. Develop mathematical skills.
      use significant digits and scientific notation
      interpret word problems and apply correct formulas