WELCOME TO THE MSAD 6 BUDGET ARCHIVE  for  2014-2015

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CLICK THE LINKS BELOW TO VIEW OR DOWNLOAD the
 APPROVED 2014-2015 DISTRICT BUDGET


APPROVED GENERAL FUND BUDGET  by Validation Article - June 10, 2014

APPROVED GENERAL FUND BUDGET  by Cost Center - June 10, 2014



CLICK THE LINK BELOW TO VIEW OR DOWNLOAD the
DISTRICT BUDGET MEETING PRESENTATION
- MAY 22, 2014

DISTRICT BUDGET MEETING PRESENTATION  for  MAY, 22, 2014


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CLICK THE LINK BELOW TO VIEW OR DOWNLOAD the BUDGET PRESENTATION
prepared for the COMMUNITY BUDGET FORUM - MAY 15, 2014

COMMUNITY FORUM PRESENTATION  for  MAY, 15, 2014


CLICK THE LINK BELOW TO VIEW OR DOWNLOAD THE "FOCUS ON FINANCE" BUDGET DOCUMENT
(BOARD OF DIRECTORS RECOMMENDED 2014-2015 OPERATING BUDGET")

FOCUS-ON-FINANCE for 2014-2015



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CLICK THE LINKS BELOW TO VIEW OR DOWNLOAD THE 2013-2014 GENERAL FUND
BUDGET AS RECOMMENDED BY THE BAC, SUPERINTENDENT AND THE DBC

Click Here to View or Download 2014-2015 BUDGET SUMMARIES  pdf

Click Here to View or Download The 2014-2015 BUDGET by VALIDATION ARTICLE (Line item detail) pdf
Click Here to View or Download The 2014-2015 BUDGET by ACCOUNTABLE UNIT (Line item detail) pdf
Click Here to View or Download The 2014-2015 BUDGET by BUDGET CATEGORY (Line item detail) pdf
Click Here to View or Download The 2014-2015 BUDGET by FUNCTION (Line item detail) pdf

Click Here to View or Download The 2014-2015 ADULT EDUCATION BUDGET pdf


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CLICK THE LINKS BELOW TO VIEW OR DOWNLOAD THE SUPERINTENDENT'S BUDGET PRESENTATIONS


Click Here to View or Download The Superintendent's RECOMMENDED 2014-2015 BUDGET RECAP for 04/17/14

Click Here to View or Download The Superintendent'sRECOMMENDED 2014-2015 BUDGET Presentation 04/03/14



CLICK THE LINKS BELOW TO VIEW OR DOWNLOAD 2014-15 ED279 STATE SUBSIDY PRINTOUTS

Click Here to download 2014-2015 "REVISED PRELIMINARY" ED 279 - 4.17.14
Click Here to download 2014-2015 "PRELIMINARY" ED 279
- 3.06.14



CLICK THE LINKS BELOW TO VIEW OR DOWNLOAD BAC PRESENTATIONS


CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD THE BAC PRESENTATION FOR 03/29/2014

CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD THE BAC PRESENTATION FOR 01/23/14

 CLICK HERE TO VIEW THE PRELIMINARY BASELINE BUDGET FOR 2014-2015



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CLICK THE LINKS BELOW TO VIEW OR DOWNLOAD MORE INFORMATION

           
                         Click Here to download 2012-2013 Audit Report                
 

DEFINITION OF THE BUDGET PROCESS


A good budget process is far more than the preparation of a legal document that appropriates funds for a series of line items. Good
budgeting is a broadly defined process that has political, managerial, planning, communication, and financial dimensions. The following definition recognizes the broad scope of the budget process and provides a base for improvement of budget process.

"The budget process consists of activities that encompass the development, implementation, and evaluation of a plan for the provision of services and capital assets."

A good budget process is characterized by several essential features.

"A good budget process:

· Incorporates a long-term perspective,

· Establishes linkages to broad organizational goals,

· Focuses budget decisions on results and outcomes,

· Involves and promotes effective communication with stakeholders,                                     
and

· Provides opportunities for the community, board, administration and staff members to work continuously to improve the process."


These key characteristics of good budgeting make clear that the budget process is not simply an exercise in balancing revenues and expenditures one year at a time, but is strategic in nature, encompassing a multi-year financial and operating plan that allocates resources on the basis of identified goals. A good budget process moves beyond the traditional concept of line item expenditure control, providing incentives and flexibility to managers that can lead to improved program efficiency and effectiveness.

NATIONAL ADVISORY COUNCIL ON STATE AND LOCAL BUDGETING -  Government Finance Officers Association.


Holding back our children


AN ESSAY BY
DR. SCOTT McLEOD


(See the third video: "Education an a digital world" located in the center-bar)

Digital technologies are magnifiers and amplifiers of our humanity. They extend the reach of our human voice. They increase a millionfold our capacities and inclinations to find, connect, and share with others. They boost exponentially our abilities to collaborate with others, do meaningful work, and contribute to the overall good.

Can you exercise human voice without digital technologies?


Can you find, connect, and share with others without digital technologies?


Can you collaborate with others, do meaningful work, and contribute to the overall good without digital technologies?

Sure. We did so for millennia. But in the digital, global world that we now inhabit, decisions to marginalize technology are intentional relinquishments of potential and power. In the digital, global world that we now inhabit, decisions to ignore technology are willful disconnects from community, society, and the way the world works.

In schools, we are supposed to be empowering children. We are supposed to be preparing our students to be not just competent – but hopefully adept – in today’s and tomorrow’s information environments, work climates, and learning landscapes. 

Essay Continued in the side-bar to the right........>




THE MISSION OF THE BUDGET PROCESS



"The mission of the budget process is to help decision makers make informed choices about the provision of services and capital assets and to promote stakeholder participation in the process."

NATIONAL ADVISORY COUNCIL ON STATE AND LOCAL BUDGETING
















A blast from the past:
A PSA produced in 1995 by 5th graders in Helena, Montana.
Seventeen years later – because of insufficient quantities of
 computing devices, differential student usage and access,
adult fears, and many other issues – many of our students
are STILL asking how they can get on the
Internet at their school…


COMMUNICATION AND INVOLVEMENT


A company is not likely to remain in business if it does not stay in touch with its customers. While School Systems that are not in touch and do not have involved citizens must remain in business, the results are often not pleasant for the citizens or the district. Apathy is a serious illness of schools. It is in the best interests of district to have involved ‘‘stakeholders.’’

The term ‘‘stakeholder’’ refers to anyone affected by or has a stake in the school system. This term includes, but is not limited to: citizens, elected officials, students, teachers, administrators, other employees, unions, businesses, other governments, and the media.

It is vital that the budget process include all stakeholders. The budget process should accomplish the following:

 · Involve stakeholders,

· Identify stakeholder issues and concerns,

· Obtain stakeholder support for the overall budgeting process,

· Achieve stakeholder acceptance of decisions related to goals, services  and resource utilization,


· Report to stakeholders on services and resource utilization, and serve generally to enhance the stakeholders’ view of school system.

The importance of this aspect of the budget process cannot be overstated. Regular and frequent reporting is necessary to provide accountability, educate and inform stakeholders, and improve their confidence in the district. Communication and involvement is an essential component of every aspect of the budget process.






Holding back our children
(Continued from Left Side-Bar)

But instead of recognizing and seizing the affordances that these new tools provide us for learning, teaching, and schooling, we pretend that our students can be masterful
WITHOUT
learning how to use digital technologies authentically. Or meaningfully. Or powerfully. And

 by doing so, we do our students a horrible, sometimes shameful, disservice.

By now it’s clear that digital technologies are here to stay. By now it’s clear that they’re having transformative impacts on everything around us. And yet we hesitate. We dig in. We resist and we rationalize and we make excuses for ourselves and our institutions. And every day that we do so, the gap widens between our practice and our reality. Every day that we do so, our youth lose another opportunity to be better prepared for our present and their future.

Educators, policymakers, professors, and parents:

Our lack of vision and our limited understanding of our technology-suffused landscapes are holding back our children. Why don’t we care more?

~~

About Scott McLeod

Scott McLeod, J.D., Ph.D., is an Associate Professor of Educational Leadership at the University of Kentucky. He also is the Founding Director of the UCEA Center for the Advanced Study of Technology Leadership in Education (CASTLE), the nation’s only academic center dedicated to the technology needs of school administrators, He has received numerous national awards for his technology leadership work, including recognitions from the cable industry, Phi Delta Kappa, and the National School Boards Association. Dr. McLeod blogs regularly about technology leadership issues at his blog: Dangerously Irrelevant