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Uniforms

The Uniforms of the United States Marine Corps serve to distinguish Marines from members of other services. Among current uniforms in the United States Armed Forces, the Marines' uniforms have been in service the longest. The Marine Dress Blue uniform has, with few changes, been worn in essentially its current form since the 19th century. There are three different types of uniforms and sub types of each.

The Utility Uniform
The Marine Corps Combat Utility Uniform is intended for wear in the field or for working parties, but has become the typical working uniform for all deployed and mostMarines. There are two approved varieties of the uniform, woodland/winter (green/brown/black) and desert/summer (tan/brown/grey). The variety worn depends on the environment and season: Deployed Marines wear whichever color is more appropriate to the climate and terrain; Marines in garrison wear the woodland MCCUU in winter months, and the desert MCCUU in summer months. It consists of MARPAT blouse and trousers, green undershirt, and tan suede boots.





Source
(n.d.). Retrieved December 10, 2014, from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Uniforms_of_the_United_States_Marine_Corps#Service_uniform

 
The Service Uniform
The service uniform consists of green and khaki colors. It is the prescribed uniform when, serving on a court-martial, attending appearance in criminal court (off installations), making official visits and calls on American and foreign dignitaries, officials, and military officers. Visiting the White House, except when in a tourist capacity, or on an occasion where another uniform is specified.

The service uniforms are designated:
  • Service "A" (or Alpha) is the base uniform. It consists of a green coat, green trousers with khaki web belt, khaki long-sleeve button-up shirt, khaki tie, tie clasp, and black shoes. The coat is cut to be semi-form fitting, with ribbons and marksmanship badges worn on the left chest of the coat. Women wear a green necktab in place of the tie, pumps instead of shoes, and have the option of wearing a skirt instead of slacks. It is sometimes appropriate to remove the jacket while indoors.
  • Service "B" (or Bravo) is identical to the "A" except the coat is removed. Ribbons may be worn on the shirt.
  • Service "C" (or Charlie) is identical to the "B" except with a short-sleeve button-up shirt and no tie.

There are two types of authorized headwear for the service uniform. Both men and women may wear the green soft garrison cap, sometimes nicknamed a "piss cutter". There is the option of wearing a hard-framed service cap (called a Barracks Cover). The design of these covers differ between women and men. However in late 2013, the Commandant of the Marine Corps approved the Marine Corps Uniform Board's recommendation to adopt the male dress and service cap as the universal dress and service cap for all Marines (male and female). As on the Blue Dress uniform, officers wear rank insignia on the shoulder epaulettes of their jackets and the collars of their shirts, while enlisted personnel wear rank insignia sewn on their sleeves.

A green crewneck sweater in the same color shade as that of the trousers may be worn with the "B" and "C" uniforms, rank insignia is displayed on shoulder epaulettes, officers their respective ranks and black for enlisted. When wearing the crewneck sweater with the long sleeve khaki shirt, a tie is not required.

Source
(n.d.). Retrieved December 10, 2014, from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Uniforms_of_the_United_States_Marine_Corps#Service_uniform


The Dress Uniform
The most recognizable uniform of the Marine Corps is the Blue Dress uniform, often seen in recruiting advertisements. It is often called "Dress Blues" or simply "Blues". The various designations are listed in descending order of formality:
  • Blue Dress "A" has a long-sleeved blue coat (enlisted members have red trim) with a standing collar and white web belt (with corresponding by rank gold waist-plate) for enlisted; midnight blue for officers with a gold M-buckle, white barracks cover (a peaked cap), plain white shirt, sky blue trousers (midnight blue for general officers), white gloves, and black dress shoes and socks. Full-size medals are worn on the left chest, with ribbon-only awards worn on the right. Marksmanship badges are not worn. Women wear pumps in place of shoes, and may wear a skirt in place of slacks. For men, the dress coat is cut to be formfitting.
  • Blue Dress "B" is the same as "A", but medals are replaced with their corresponding ribbons and all are consolidated on the left chest. Marksmanship badges may be worn. No Medals Are Worn
  • Blue Dress "C" is the same as "B", but a khaki long sleeve button-up shirt and tie replace the outer blue coat and white gloves. Ribbons and badges are normally worn on the shirt. No Outer Coat
  • Blue Dress "D" is the same as "C", but with a khaki short sleeve button-up shirt and no tie.

Because the Blue Dress uniform is considered formal wear, Blue Dress "C" and "D" are rarely worn. 

Officers, NCOs, and SNCOs wear a scarlet "blood stripe" down the outer seam of each leg of the blue trousers. General officers wear a 2 in (5.1 cm) wide stripe, field- and company-grade officers have a 1.5 in (3.8 cm) wide stripe, SNCOs and NCOs have a 1.125 in (2.86 cm) wide stripe. General officers wear trousers that are the same color as the coat, while all other ranks wear medium (sky) blue trousers. A blue boat-cloak with a scarlet lining is optional.

A blue crewneck sweater, in the same color shade as that of the trousers, may be worn with the "C" and "D" uniforms, rank insignia is displayed on shoulder epaulettes, officers their respective ranks and anodized brass for enlisted. When wearing the crewneck sweater with the long sleeve khaki shirt, a tie is not required.

Source
(n.d.). Retrieved December 10, 2014, from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Uniforms_of_the_United_States_Marine_Corps#Dress_uniform