Fall 2013 Newsletter

Table of Contents

  • The EDYS Department Congratulates Carrie Hatcher '13 ! This fall, Carrie Hatcher ’13 has been doing an Honors Term project in art educational programming at the Wright Museum.  Her goal has been to develop and run a variety ...
    Posted Dec 17, 2013, 10:02 AM by Education Studies
  • New EDYS Special Topics Course in Spring 2014 "Historically Black Colleges and Universities: Contemporary Issues" With Darlington and YoungbloodSonja Darlington and Cecil Youngblood will be teaching another new special topics course entitled, “Historically Black Colleges and Universities ...
    Posted Dec 17, 2013, 10:01 AM by Education Studies
  • Department of Education and Youth Studies Excellence in Teaching Symposium Save the date: February 3, 2014We are very pleased to announce that our speaker will be Dr. Marybeth Gasman.  Dr. Gasman is Professor of Higher Education at the University ...
    Posted Dec 17, 2013, 9:32 AM by Education Studies
  • New Faculty Advisors! Introducing our Fall 2013 Student Teacher Faculty Supervisors:  Ann Firlus and Carol Fox Supervising student teachers is a labor-intensive enterprise. Each student must be observed and evaluated at least ...
    Posted Dec 17, 2013, 9:33 AM by Education Studies
  • New EDYS Majors Welcome to EDYS! The following students have declared an EDYS Major within the past year:Track 1 (Children in Schools)Taurie BurnsIssac ChafkinCoral EllisBrigitte Hautzinger Kelsey Horvath ...
    Posted Dec 17, 2013, 8:45 AM by Education Studies
  • Faculty Over the Summer Jingjing Lou: Jingjing spent the summer working on two writing projects. The first was her recently published paper discussing her experiences teaching an FYI in 2011, entitled "When Aristotle Meets ...
    Posted Dec 17, 2013, 9:42 AM by Education Studies
  • New Student Worker in the EDYS Department Student worker Caitlyn Fisher is new to the EDYS department. She is a first-year student from Ann Arbor, Michigan.  Caitlyn’s major is as of yet undecided, but she ...
    Posted Dec 17, 2013, 9:44 AM by Education Studies
  • Current Student Teachers The following EDYS Track 1 and Track 2 majors are completing their Student Teaching term this Fall.  We wish you all the best!Track 1Emeline Beck, Midvale Elementary, Second ...
    Posted Dec 17, 2013, 8:48 AM by Education Studies
Showing posts 1 - 8 of 9. View more »

The EDYS Department Congratulates Carrie Hatcher '13 !

posted Dec 17, 2013, 9:59 AM by Education Studies   [ updated Dec 17, 2013, 10:02 AM ]

This fall, Carrie Hatcher ’13 has been doing an Honors Term project in art educational programming at the Wright Museum.  Her goal has been to develop and run a variety of arts educational programs that would reach out to the Beloit community.
Check out the links below to learn more about Carrie's inspiring work!


                                                                                                                                                                                                                       

New EDYS Special Topics Course in Spring 2014

posted Dec 13, 2013, 10:16 AM by Caitlyn Fisher   [ updated Dec 17, 2013, 10:01 AM by Education Studies ]

"Historically Black Colleges and Universities: Contemporary Issues" With Darlington and Youngblood

Sonja Darlington and Cecil Youngblood will be teaching another new special topics course entitled, “Historically Black Colleges and Universities: Contemporary Issues” in spring 2014. This course will investigate the significance of historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) and the critical role they provide for African American education in the United States.  Until the mid-20th century HBCUs enrolled nearly 100% of all African Americans. Currently, the enrollment at the 105 HBCUs represents 11% of the Black students in the US and HBCUs include public, private, religious, sectarian, two-year, four-year, selective, open, urban, and rural institutions.  The goals for the course will focus on understanding why African American students can benefit from an HBCU education, how HBCUs developed in response to the Civil War era politics and continue to address societal needs of African Americans, and how HBCU institutions relate positively to the mission of a liberal arts education.


Darlington and Youngblood have been interested in HBCUs for some time, and after reading some of Marybeth Gasman’s books (e.g., 2010, Unearthing Promise and Potential: Our Nation’s Historically Black Colleges and Universities) and articles (e.g., 2007, “A Historiography of Gender and Black Colleges”), they became convinced it was time to put their interest into practice.  Along with guest speakers from the Beloit community who have attended HBCUs, an introductory dinner with students and HBCU graduates and friends, and class research projects based on a specific HBCU, Darlington and Youngblood hope to have funding so that students in the course can visit two HBCUs in Ohio: Wilberforce and Central State.  This trip will be coordinated with Beloit High School, which annually visits an HBCU school.


Both Darlington and Youngblood are eager for Beloit College students to realize some of the benefits from attending an HBCU. To coincide with their course, EDYS is sponsoring the annual Excellence in Teaching Symposim lecture, February 3, 2014, by the prolific scholar Marybeth Gasman, who is a professor of Higher Education in the Graduate School of Education at the University of Pennsylvania.  Gasman’s scholarship addresses the history of HBCUs, funding and philanthropic topics, contemporary black medical programs/institutions, along with current writing on issues of race, class and gender with her students.  They hope that the greater Beloit community will embrace this significant topic by attending the Gasman lecture.


Department of Education and Youth Studies Excellence in Teaching Symposium

posted Dec 12, 2013, 6:26 PM by Caitlyn Fisher   [ updated Dec 17, 2013, 9:32 AM by Education Studies ]

Save the date: February 3, 2014

We are very pleased to announce that our speaker will be Dr. Marybeth Gasman.  Dr. Gasman is Professor of Higher Education at the University of Pennsylvania.  She also serves as the Inaugural Director of the Penn Center for Minority Serving Institutions.  Her areas of interest include Minority Serving Institutions, philanthropy and fundraising in communities of color, and teaching for justice.  Marybeth regularly writes for The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Huffington Post, The Chronicle of Higher Education, and Diverse on issues of race and education.  




The title of her presentation is "The Changing Face of Historically Black Colleges and Universities."  This presentation provides a rich grounding in the history of Historically Black Colleges and Universities, discusses their strengths and challenges, and considers their role in the landscape of higher education as well as the future of the nation.

New Faculty Advisors!

posted Dec 12, 2013, 6:18 PM by Caitlyn Fisher   [ updated Dec 17, 2013, 9:33 AM by Education Studies ]

Introducing our Fall 2013 Student Teacher Faculty Supervisors:  Ann Firlus and Carol Fox

Supervising student teachers is a labor-intensive enterprise. Each student must be observed and evaluated at least four times, and each student’s teaching must be fully evaluated by his or her supervisor.

The college supervisor is an intermediary between the college and the student teaching placement.  The supervisor is primarily interested in making student teaching a quality experience for all constituents involved.  Their concern is for steady growth in teaching rather than the rating of any particular performance.  The supervisor’s questions, comments and criticisms are designed to encourage student teachers to develop habits of critical thinking in the examination of their teaching efforts.

The department of Education and Youth Studies is pleased to have former Beloit Memorial High School teacher, Ann Firlus, and former Beloit School District teacher and principal, Carol Fox as our student teacher supervisors this term!

Employment of former principals and teachers in this supervisory capacity is standard practice in teacher education programs: they provide practical and professional perspectives that complement those of college faculty. They also bring with them connections to the local school communities that are invaluable to a teacher education program. Inasmuch as the school district of Beloit has a highly diverse student body, and faculty, the Supervisor will be working closely with college students in developing the level of “cultural literacy” necessary for success in public school classrooms.

Carol Fox writes, “I'm excited about my role as a supervisor for aspiring teachers.  I'm passionate about education and the need for teachers who are willing to do what is needed for students.  I feel that the key to improving our educational system today is to ensure that we have high quality, dedicated teachers in every classroom.  Teachers who are willing to engage students in high quality learning, thinking, and creative endeavors.  Beloit College students have an understanding of diversity and the need for providing depth of understanding in learners.”

 Thank you! and Welcome! to Ann and Carol.

 

New EDYS Majors

posted Dec 11, 2013, 10:53 AM by Caitlyn Fisher   [ updated Dec 17, 2013, 8:45 AM by Education Studies ]

Welcome to EDYS! 
The following students have declared an EDYS Major within the past year:

Track 1 (Children in Schools)


Taurie Burns

Issac Chafkin

Coral Ellis

Brigitte Hautzinger 

Kelsey Horvath

Emily Mingus

Nora Polaski

Jacob Theunte

Gina Widmer

Geoffrey Wisalowski


Track 2 (Adolescents in Schools)


Christina Alger
 
Adrianna Baldwin

William Banville

Izabella Berman

Daniel Corral

Jacob Fisher

Patrick Galloway

Andrew Garcia

Brenda Guzman

Erin Laskin

James Leyhane

Orianna O'Neill

Laura Panicali

Alexandria Rehfeldt

Seth Sanderson

Rebecca Scheckel

Darth Winkler

Matthew Woodstock

Youth and Society


Sarah Ashenbrener

Nathan Brault

Dalton Davies

Sasha Jacobs

Cassandra King

Vanessa Pena

Fabiola Ramirez

Hatheway Rawlinson

Lauren Rivas

Ahmad Shamsid-Deen

Janae Strother

Hana Vackova

Danielle Wright



























Faculty Over the Summer

posted Dec 11, 2013, 10:32 AM by Caitlyn Fisher   [ updated Dec 17, 2013, 9:42 AM by Education Studies ]

Jingjing Lou: 
Jingjing spent the summer working on two writing projects. The first was her recently published paper discussing her experiences teaching an FYI in 2011, entitled "When Aristotle Meets Confucius: Liberal Arts Education for Sustainable Development; Reflections from Teaching a First Year Seminar in a U. S. College." This paper was published under the International Journal of Chinese Education this past September. Jingjing also worked on editing the book, Rural Schooling in China: A Multidisciplinary Analysis of Its Changing Ecology, in contract with Routledge and scheduled to be published in 2014. 

Kathy Greene and Tom Owenby
Over the summer Kathy and Tom co-mentored Danny Corral (EDYS Track 2) and Reine Lucas as part of the McNair Scholars Program.

New Student Worker in the EDYS Department

posted Dec 11, 2013, 10:14 AM by Caitlyn Fisher   [ updated Dec 17, 2013, 9:44 AM by Education Studies ]


Student worker Caitlyn Fisher is new to the EDYS department. She is a first-year student from Ann Arbor, Michigan.  Caitlyn’s major is as of yet undecided, but she has an interest in Cognitive Science, Creative Writing, and Psychology. Her hobbies include baking, rolling in piles of dry leaves, and making other people laugh. 














Current Student Teachers

posted Dec 11, 2013, 10:03 AM by Caitlyn Fisher   [ updated Dec 17, 2013, 8:48 AM by Education Studies ]

The following EDYS Track 1 and Track 2 majors are completing their Student Teaching term this Fall.  

We wish you all the best!

Track 1

Emeline Beck, Midvale Elementary, Second Grade

Nofiya Denbaum, West Liberty Elementary, Fifth Grade

Steffany Streb, Todd Elementary, First Grade

Track 2

Elizabeth Capstick, Hononegah High School, Math and Science

Kristina Erickson, Beloit Memorial High School, English

Melissa Fiegel, Beloit Memorial High School, English

Stephen Porter, Beloit Memorial High School, Math

Sydney Schwartz, Beloit Turner High School, French

Emily Wells, Beloit Memorial High School, Performing Arts

Sonja Darlington's Teaching and Research in Botswana

posted Dec 11, 2013, 9:50 AM by Caitlyn Fisher   [ updated Dec 17, 2013, 9:48 AM by Education Studies ]















    Professor Sonja Darlington, who has been on sabbatical, directed the 

    Associate Colleges of the Midwest (ACM) Botswana Program in Gaborone in 

    Spring 2013.  Her program included 17 students, including Track III major

    Zoe Gierman from Beloit College.  Darlington’s role as ACM Director and Visiting 

Professor in Sociology at the University of Botswana (UB) included teaching two  

courses: Youth Culture and Education in Botswana, and an Independent Study; and, in 

    addition, she helped organized field trips for a homestay to the village of Mochudi, a  

visit to Soweto/Johannesburg, and a safari to the Okavango Delta.   



    In her education course, ACM and UB students hailed from the US, Zambia, Zimbabwe, 

India, Bhutan, and Sweden. Wednesday class meetings were particularly robust as 

ACM and UB students debated issues, such as capital punishment, activism by LGTB 

students, government vs. private education, the role of witchcraft, and minority 

languages.  Other classes included guest speakers on the arts in Botswana, the death of 

African languages, the “San” people’s displacement from the Kalahari, and immigration 

spaces in Botswana, such as in Francistown.



    In preparation for the Botswana program, Darlington immersed herself in the 

literature by Bessie Head, the internationally known writer during the Apartheid era, 

whose novels and short stories have influenced generations of students. She also 

    studied the poetry of Barolong Seboni, one of a handful of Botswana poets who write 

in English.  As part of her research efforts, Darlington hosted a two-day workshop, 

along with UB Professor Seboni, for young aspiring writers who were either former UB 

students and/or professionals, dependent on their writing skills.  



    While in Botswana, Darlington also engaged in helping to edit an anthology of critical 

essays on Botswana literature. To date, a limitation for students studying literature has 

been that Botswana literature in English has been explicated in journal articles but not 

in a book length form.  In order to provide university students with a critical text that 

identifies and elaborates the history of the development of Botswana literature in 

English, she has been working on this ongoing project.



    In the role of public intellectual, Darlington also published three articles in the Mmeg

newspaper: “Why Does Music Education Matter,” “Education: Rolling the Dice of 

Quality,” and “Botswana’s Artistic Talent Begs to Be Nurtured.”  In all three pieces, she 

attempts to elaborate how education in Botswana has aspects that are well  worth 

developing further, in order to provide students with meaningful schooling 

experiences.



    Among the many terrific experiences that Darlington had in Botswana, she thoroughly 

enjoyed learning Setswana. Based on her research and contacts in 2007, Darlington 

was instrumental in hiring independent scholar Mary Lederer as the liaison between 

 Peace Corps instructors and ACM students.  2013 was the first year that ACM students 

studied Setswana based on a conversational approach.   According to Darlington, 

Setswana is a more difficult language to learn than Kiswahili, which she also studied.  

Setswana is a Bantu language like Kiswahili but it is also dependent on understanding 

the tonal quality of words and learning its more difficult orthography.



    Ultimately, Darlington hopes to utilize her Botswana experience to inspire Beloit 

College students, not only in her Education and Youth Studies classes, for study abroad 

and learning a foreign language.  In Fall 2014, she will teach an FYI on Working Class 

Literature, a topic that intrigued her when she read an introductory article by Jeanetta 

Mish on the literature of the global working class in the journal World Literature 

Today.  Darlington noticed that an example of a poet/novelist from the African 

continent was not included among the contemporary writers whose works were 

discussed.  This oversight in introducing American audiences to the rich cultural 

legacy of contemporary African writers and artists is one that she has attempted to 

address in many of her publications and presentations since her arrival to Beloit in 

1992.


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