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SNS


"Social Network Sites" 

Contents

  1. 1 "Social Network Sites" 
    1. 1.1 Differences in Users and uses of varying SNSs 
  2. 2 These are important, so important in fact they have been given thier own sub topic header, see here.Between the SexesAs can be demonstrated by the included graphic, there are some sites which attract more female attention than male and vis versa. 
    1. 2.1 Generational differences
  3. 3 Social Media & Networks
  4. 4 Social Media has been the Buzz word within advertising and marketing arenas that has revolutionized the industry as a whole in recent years. There are vast amounts of direction and support within this sector available online and some of the more valuable and interesting of these resources has also been included below.
    1. 4.1 Further Notes on Social Networks & Media.... 
    2. 4.2 Make reference to Greenstien (2010, June 21) Feedback and Filters are Necessary in Social Media  http://mashable.com/2010/06/20/feedback-filters-social-media/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+Mashable+%28Mashable%29&utm_content=Netvibes "Thus, individuals and businesses can miss out on the real value of these networks because the bare bones web interfaces don’t allow them to effectively filter, categorize, or otherwise make sense of the information. Like cell phone loud-talkers, we make noise and don’t realize it –- and we end up consuming useless noise from others instead of tapping into the real potential."SNS placed under many more constraints in research field than practically. (Maguire & Singer, 2007, July 2003) Research different to clinical practice – this in reference to social workers industry talks, discussing rehabilitation of members of community. Traditionally based in studies of anthropology and sociology. 


















Since "Six Degrees" launch in 2001, we have seen prolific numbers of SNSs that have seemed to appear from no-where. However, despite the over 200 currently active sites (Wikipedia, 2010), it was "Facebook" which was primarily responsible for bring SNSs into the mainstream, and they continue to be the most widely used internationally. But we know already that they are not something that has just appeared, the well known saying, "its not what you know, it's who you know" demonstrates the long appreciated recognition of the potential value of one's networks. 



Ultimately, humans are social animals.  Studies from social disciplines have recognised for years that people with greater linkages with others in their social networks, are generally more likely to be happier, and contribute more to their communities that those who have few such links. Traditionally based network research has sometimes been intrinsically limiting for today’s reality where these are limitless, as early models developed defined limited properties and measures (Maguire, 2007). The concept of social networks is so intrinsic to us as people that its presence can be found in many varying areas of the community, society and economies. Yet the presence of these networks online and thier ability to display and negotiate our connections has changed the game. 

The influence of these SNSs continues to get increasingly more pervasive, making our “actual” and virtual realities almost indistinguishable (Lewis et al, 2008). With SNSs exploding on the internet, appearing prolifically through 2003, it only took a few years for them to enter the mainstream. And by 2007 the world was so enthralled that media were forced to start paying attention. Responsible for creating classic titles such as "Social networking sites now more popular than porn sites!" (The Times, 2007), Social media has enforced the tacit change in the advertising and marketing industries.

Social Network Sites

Defined as ‘web-based services that allow individuals to;

(1) construct a public or semi-public profile, 

(2) connect

 
Evidence widely recognises their place as a critical requirement for business, "social networking gaining ground as the preferred mechanism for both consumers and employees to build, strengthen and extend relationships" (Parkinson & Hardman, 2010). But their acceptance of this may have been ahead of the rest of us. Now, we have seen the creation of new industries within some business functions, (a great example is of the advertising and marketing industry) with the broader community recognising the realistic potential for benefit and/or impact through adopting and utilising such tools and services. The changes as such also demonstrate the societal shifts we continue to see result as part of this increasing “connected reality”.

There is also a concern for managing the generational difference, which is not unique to this context and widely discussed in HRM broadly. The current social and economic contexts globally have been redefined and socio-cultural influences continue to be the cause of changes and development in society, business and entrepreneurship internationally, with particular relevance in a NZ setting. The framework developed assesses and categorises the vast amounts of existing research. Through this process, shortcomings and gaps in the current understanding have been highlighted for review. There is clearly potential for developing further insight, particularly within the NZ context, by overlapping such concepts, especially drawing emphasis on the common areas where obstacles to growth are experienced. There has been movements internationally which have both driven and resulted from this connected-ness which is an imperative force on current societies. Networks are not new but SNSs are distinctly different and cause the rules to change. Yet contemporary understandings and studies of SNSs seem relatively disparate and not integrated with new. Rise in lifestyle and social entrepreneurship, sustainability and going green is predominately a nation of small businesses’ (MED, 2009, p9)

Responsible for creating classic titles such as "Social networking sites now more popular than porn sites!" (The Times, 2007), social media has enforced the tacit change in the advertising and marketing industries. The influence of these SNSs continues to get increasingly more pervasive, making our “actual” and virtual realities almost indistinguishable (Lewis et al, 2008). With SNSs exploding on the internet, appearing prolifically through 2003, it only took a few years for them to enter the mainstream. And by 2007 the world was so enthralled that media were forced to start paying attention. Responsible for creating classic titles such as "Social networking sites now more popular than porn sites!" (The Times, 2007), Social media has enforced the tacit change in the advertising and marketing industries. Boyd and Ellison (2007) define Social Network Sites as ‘web-based services that allow individuals to (1) construct a public or semi-public profile within a bounded system, (2) articulate a list of other users with whom they share a connection, and (3) view and traverse their list of connections and those made by others within the system’ (p2).

 Rise in lifestyle and social entrepreneurship, sustainability and going green is predominately a nation of small businesses’ (MED, 2009, p9). Yet despite SMEs seemingly being set up to benefit from SNS’s potentially the most, given their ability to cross space and distance of New Zealand’s shores is no longer a hindrance. However, somewhat counter-intuitively, SME’s don’t appear to be gaining the maximum value in their use of SNSs. (Contributor, 2010). They have also reportedly found many aspects of online business operations and strategy overwhelming. Largely speaking, those who have appeared to make the most out of these widely adaptable SNS techniques appear to be the larger, older multinational corporations. And of those, many have limited considerations to media and customer relationship management. Despite the trends, developments and projects of micro-financing have largely not even touched on the organisational efficiencies it has afforded to us.

Considerations into the “digital intern” highlight what some of these future concepts may look like as they take shape, and obviously may be a reasonable and viable idea for almost any industry. (Ernst, 2009). SMEs in particular must continue to be aware of the advantages which are available as SNSs “provide simple, inexpensive ways to organise meetings, spread info and gauge opinion.” (Ellison, Lampe & Steinfield, 2009).

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