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Douglas Frankish


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Canandaigua, U.S.A


Live curious, and go beyond... the traditional sense of schooling within current practices.


Mobile devices naturally lend themselves to ubiquitous learning, which leads to the need for students acting as constant critical thinkers, and purposeful creators of knowledge. It is what students do with this knowledge collaboratively that will lead toward creative, collective innovation.


Areas of expertise: Infusing best instructional practices and thinking skills through the use of ASFM's officially adopted tools.

     Twitter Handle: @dougfrankish

                Website: dougfrankish.wordpress.com


Survey Says... Blended Learning

posted Apr 5, 2017, 11:09 AM by Douglas Frankish   [ updated Apr 5, 2017, 12:28 PM ]

Man Thinking Icon made by Freepik from www.flaticon.com

Last week the Elementary Tech Integration team surveyed the staff regarding different examples of Blended Learning. In seven different scenarios, teachers were depicted using different types of technology in different ways. The survey was a simple Yes- this is an example of Blended Learning, or No- it is not. While we were glad to see about half of the staff had a solid understanding and correctly categorized the scenarios, that left approximately 60 of our teachers confused- a number we would like to improve.

The following afternoon at an all staff technology training, we reviewed the different case studies, provided the answers the staff had chosen- and then showed the "correct answer", including a brief explanation for why. There were some murmurs among teachers and clarifying questions about why an answer was/was not Blended Learning. Lingering questions even continued the next day. What we tried to convey, was that the case studies needed to be read in black and white. The person answering the question could not insinuate or infer more than what was in words for the particular scenario. Sure, by implementing best practices, a teacher would follow up and adjust his/her teaching based on the results from a formative assessment/response tool. However, if the the example did not state this, one could not assume this was the case. This helped resolve some confusion, but some teachers held firm in their belief, or disbelief, with the answers we provided. Regardless, teachers left this portion of the professional development afternoon thinking at a deeper level about the meaning of Blended Learning and their use of technology to support student learning experiences. 

Go ahead an click through the Google Slide presentation. How did you do answering these questions? (Questions begin on slide 7)

Tech TLC Tuesday March 28, 2017


The second section of the meeting included an adapted version of Family Feud- in order to review ASFM's six strands of Blended Learning. Two teaching teams were called to the front of the room to have a face-to-face challenge of identifying the strand of blended learning, based on a tool being used in yet another case study. Theme music, clapping, and cheering endured as the energy in the room increased and teachers became anxious to participate. The six strands were uncovered correctly and much quicker than anticipated (just one mistake was made)! However, due to the excitement and noise, not all of the questions could be heard by the audience, and in addition, some eager participants were aware of the answer prior to the question being read in its entirety. They chimed in, answered the question, and we moved on. Upon reflection, the tech team could have asked participants to wait for the question to be read before chiming in, or stated the question fully after the answer had been given. During the excitement of the moment, the possibility for improvement was overlooked and therefore, below I am including the six different questions and the correct answers for each. 

Family Feud Questions 2017


You can view the Google Slide presentation we used to accompany the Family Feud game. The slide is interactive/animated based on where you click- so it may seem a bit clunky for viewing purposes. (If you'd like to have a copy of our template, feel free to email me at douglas.frankish@asfm.edu.mx)

ASFM Family Feud


To culminate the afternoon, we asked teacher teams to reflect on Blended Learning by creating three different memes representing a struggle, success, and next step. The idea stemmed from a session from the Live Curious, Go Beyond conference (2017), where I learned about the "Not So Standardized Assessment" with Mary Wever and Candace Marcotte. Using an alternate (and fun) way to reflect on Blended Learning, teachers were also exposed to a type of assessment they may find valuable in their context. While we had varying levels of interpretation and comfort using a technology tool like this, there was 100% participation. You can review the memes in the slides below. 

ASFM Blended Learning Memes


Overall, the afternoon provided some time for teacher learning, exploring, creating, sharing, and reflecting- something so beneficial but often difficult to manage given the busy lives of teachers! Regardless, it's important to carve out and dedicate time to digging deeper and reflecting on our practices as educators. 


Is It Worth The Time Invested?

posted Aug 13, 2016, 10:14 AM by Douglas Frankish

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Teachers, both new and experienced are always on the lookout for ways to make learning and productivity as streamlined, effective, and efficient as possible. Many teachers are masters at having systems in place to maximize student achievement. Yet as experienced as some educators are- the beginning of the school year always requires a multitude of hours when preparing for students to arrive. And once students are finally in classrooms, lessons tend to take longer than anticipated, activities aren't completed, and daily plans get pushed to the following day. This happens primarily because routines have yet to be established with the new group of students. What used to be completed in 30 seconds at the end of the previous year- now takes 5 minutes. Yet teachers persevere and take time to establish routines and expectations because of the long term benefits they will have on student learning. The result is worth the time invested.

Time is the operative word here. A common question teachers ask themselves is- "Is it worth the time invested" to complete a particular task? Hours are spent preparing the physical classroom for students, creating the most productive learning space possible, because it is worth the time invested as the year progresses. Additional time is spent creating grade books, labeling student names, establishing routines, creating and revising lesson plans, and numerous other tasks because they make the school year function more seamlessly.

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When it comes to the digital world, the same "time investment" question should still be considered. Yet this doesn't seem to happen as often as it does in the physical world. With technology, we are so accustomed to quick fixes, workarounds and efficiency, that it can be frustrating when there is not or quick trick for something we want to accomplish. Tasks such as creating email groups with all parent emails, organizing files in Google Drive, or creating content on a learning management system can sometimes seem daunting when it can't happen as quickly as one may prefer. These tasks may be left incomplete or refrain from getting traction at all because they seem so laborious. This is where it's time to ask, "Is it worth the time invested?" Like many physical world tasks, digital undertakings at the beginning of the year may take some extra time, yet they can make the life of a teacher more efficient- which leads to greater student achievement. For example, while it would be great to have a way to import all parent emails into an email group with two clicks, the functionality may not quite be there yet. A task that could take 4 clicks and 10 seconds, might take a greater amount of typing or copying and pasting and about 20 minutes. Consider the following questions; Is it worth my time invested? How many times will I email all the parents in my class? Is 20 minutes at the beginning of the year worth the amount of times I will benefit from having all parents in one email group throughout the school year? Does this make me a more efficient and effective teacher? Answering these questions might help make the decision regarding whether it is worth your invested time.

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As another school year is underway and time is of the essence, whether working in the physical or digital world, I encourage you to consider, "Is it worth the time invested?"


Where Are You in Your PLN?

posted Oct 28, 2015, 6:51 AM by Douglas Frankish   [ updated Oct 28, 2015, 6:58 AM ]

We are now in the middle of Connected Educator month 2016. This is a great time for educators to reflect on their Personal Learning Networks. In my opinion PLNs run in three stages. While it is definitely possible to flow between different stages depending on what is going on in life, take some time to reflect on where you are momentarily. Now might be the time to take it to another level.



1. Development. Teachers are constantly learning from each other within the school walls. This is a great thing, as there is a wealth of knowledge and experience we can learn from. It takes about the same amount of effort as walking down the hall to a colleague's classroom, as it does to begin learning from educators beyond the brick and mortar of a school building. Once the development of your PLN is underway, the process eases as you can begin blending your learning and can grow from information on any mobile or digital device. To develop your PLN and become a connected educator, decide which tools work best for you personally. If social media is your venue, try TwitterFacebook groups, Google+Pinterest, or Linkedin. For alternatives to social media, check out educational blogs, webinars, or curating articles through bookmarking websites. There are plenty of avenues to take in terms of developing or broadening your PLN. Decide which you tool(s) you want to use, how you want to learn, and when you want to learn. If you already find yourself in this developmental stage, I challenge you to broaden your reach. Stretch yourself to find people to connect with outside of your immediate region or even outside of your content or grade level. Push yourself to connect.



2. Consumption. Most people enter the digitally connected arena by participating through consumption. This may include reading Tweets, searching for articles, maneuvering through blog posts, watching YouTube videos, or viewing webinars. The learning and growth generally comes as a result of what is being read or taken in by the user. The learning, while more passive in the digital sense, may be shared with colleagues actively or implemented into daily practice in the physical world. If you identify yourself within this stage, I challenge you to consider sharing content or articles of your own. Try Retweeting an article you read, or reflecting and writing a blog post about a lesson that went well. It can be intimidating to put yourself out there, but take an initial step and begin to go beyond consumption.



3. Contribution. The natural next step after consuming content is a progression of participation within the PLN. Contribution may grow in the form of writing Tweets, sharing articles, or reflecting on learning through blog posts- to hosting a webinar or sharing educational videos created on YouTube. The individual at this point is in a give and take environment, where they are not only learning from others- but others are learning from them. If you already contribute within your PLN, I challenge you to push yourself outside your comfort zone. Try creating and sharing beyond the medium you are accustomed to. If you are a YouTube creator, try writing a blog post about your learning, or vice versa. If you solely learn through Twitter, try Google+ for a change. Experiment with not only broadening your PLN but also yourself as a contributor to open educational resources.


If you are finding it tough to define yourself within any of the categories above, it is never too late to exercise your growth mindset and learn from those around you. Connected Educator month is a great time to begin, as you are among many educators who are ready and willing to provide you with the support you need.

The Maker Movement Comes to ASFM with the Open Mind Zone

posted Oct 14, 2015, 8:56 AM by Douglas Frankish   [ updated Oct 14, 2015, 9:00 AM ]

The Maker Movement has come to ASFM. The "Open Mind Zone" is the name given to the makerspace on the elementary campus, and its name is part of what makes this particular space unique to other spaces within the maker community.



What is the maker movement? 
The maker movement is a trend where individuals or groups of people come together to create some type of product. Often the creations are made from combining multiple resources, several of which may be seemingly unrelated. From items that have been discarded or recycled, to dissembled pieces of technology, a “maker” looks for different ways to repurpose nearly any item put before them. For younger builders and creators, various maker kits provide safe tools to assemble pieces of cardboard, plastic, Legos, paper, etc. Makers naturally filter through steps of the design thinking cycle, where they ideate, prototype, and test their creations. Due to this exploration of ideas and prototyping, makers know the meaning of failure and do not view it with a negative connotation. Failure means learning from what went wrong and making adjustments to a product in order to make it that much better.

How is the Open Mind Zone unique? 
Along with being stocked with multiple resources, the ASFM makerspace has an additional resource- a focus on social and emotional development. While students are coached with creating, rebuilding, and repurposing by tech integration specialists, they are also being guided by a school counselor who prompts them with questions to encourage the development of collaboration and problem solving skills in a positive and inclusive manner. With upwards of twenty students creating in the Open Mind Zone at one time, accidents happen. Lego towers topple, roller coasters made of blocks crumble, artwork gets destroyed and at times tempers rise and feelings get hurt. Having guidance from a counselor helps to get through those frustrating times. The reinforcement of these skills and mindsets are directly transferable to both the classroom and life outside the school walls. With lives full of structure, in the Open Mind Zone, students have the opportunity to experience relationship building through play and exploration.

What’s next? 
The Open Mind Zone has been in action for about five weeks. Ahead, there are plans to: hold team building sessions, add tech materials such as a 3D printer and production equipment, and to begin encouraging students to document and share their creations with a global audience.

To stay up to date with what is going on in the Open Mind Zone, follow us on Twitter: @OpenMindZone

YouTube Video

Weeks 1-5

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