REDUCTION
 /  RELIEF /  RECOVERY /  RECONSTRUCTION / RENEWAL
DISASTER    /     RISK   /    HAZARD   /   CONFLICT 

Welcome to the 2011 ASF-UK Summer School mini-site! 



2011 was the sixth year we have ran our Summer School at the Eden Project in beautiful Cornwall at the south-west tip of the UK.



Every year an important and challenging area is addressed at the Summer School. 


Previous years have looked at edible places, building communities and vulnerability; this year we looked at disasters, development and the role of the built environment professional. 


If you would like to find out what we got up to then please read our blog below. We will also upload podcasts and videos of the Summer School soon.






























 
DAY SIX

Wednesday morning afforded the teams a handful of hours in which to complete their shelters before the presentations and unveiling to the public who were showing great interest in the beavering of the participants. Rufus’ team were first to finish the final touches such as a water collection device, walls, roof and balustrades. The team putting great faith in their labours huddled inside for the water test …after a couple of minutes of drenching and an 80% dry team the consensus was that it worked…apart from the giant hole in the roof required by Eden for health and safety! 


On the bamboo site, the shelter was also nearing completion with the addition of the bamboo floor, extra rubber bracing and the application of the roof covering which was interwoven with the grid of the roof....in preparation for the rain test......


At 1pm it was time up!.... and the teams who were admittedly exhausted after their five days of lectures and physical work gathered for the presentations in front of their Shelters with Yexi (bamboo) and Ciarán (timber) giving us a full insight into their concept, the construction process and their reflections on what they had learned. Videos of the final presentation and questions will be available soon.



Mick
WEDNESDAY - 07 SEPTEMBER - 03:20 PM


DAY FIVE

On Tuesday morning the team awoke to the tail end of Hurricane Irene in the form of torrential rain and wind which had swept across Cornwall. After a wet breakfast and a brisk walk the team found themselves effectively thousands of miles away in the balmy temperatures of Eden's hot and humid Biome.

Once back under shelter the teams quickly busied themselves in their shelter sites. Jack's bamboo site worryingly still remained empty, while at the upper regions of the Biome, Rufus' team was fabricating the covering of their roof and walls by weaving palm leaves into beautiful and robust cladding led by Katie and Jessica the 'weave queens'! The timber team's design had focussed on a conventional post and beam form which allowed for easy adaption whilst the bamboo team were building an organic (and untested and unfinished) roof – so it was with great trepidation that the split and woven bamboo was finally finished and lifted off the ground....

Meanwhile back up top, Rufus was feeling the loss of Alex and Rowan from the timber team, while the extreme temperatures and humidity were beginning to take their toll on the rest of the team. Sweaty heavily and with a couple of hours to go the team were fixing the floor in place and adding the final bracing.

Back at the Bamboo site which is based on the Vanuatu scenario (see PROGRAMME) the roof had been twisted into shape and tested through a gut reaction to its structural behaviour. The roof which was extremely dynamic and flexible was beautiful no doubt and an efficient use of materials…but was it emergency architecture?!…. the debate raged! When the team were happy that the roof wasn’t going to un-weave and explode, it was carried with great procession through the bemused tourists who thronged the paths of the Biome. Once secured to the base the bamboo team busied themselves with stabilising a roof that was intent on exploding back to its original flat form! With the day nearing an end both teams rushed to complete their structures ahead of closing time at Eden.

Also on Tuesday we witnessed the final assault on our campsite by the elements – Saturday night saw the end of our food gazebo which was crushed by the wind; and the weather was back with a vengeance to claim our eating tent! Unaffected the team enjoyed their dinner al fresco with fresh Cornish winds. 

Mick
TUESDAY - 06 SEPTEMBER - 11:40 PM

 
DAY FOUR 
 
Sunday night saw the end of theory days. Bamboo Jack joined the group for a talk on the possibilities of using bamboo as truly sustainable source of material. With this in mind and with a mountain of new concepts jammed in their heads, the participants took the brief and went the pub for some serious design time! An outline design was required by Eden to be authorised prior to any construction and the team are now busy working on two sites in the Biodome. To read the brief please go to the  PROGRAMME section. On Monday morning the two teams busied themselves with Rufus' timber team (Gambia scenario) seemingly making leaps and bounds ahead with the main structure of their shelter fabricated and erected by the end of the day. The timber structure is being built entirely without electrical tools and screws in the hot environment near the top of the dome. The structure connections have been jointed, bound and pegged to reflect the reality of an absence of materials following a disaster.

Bamboo Jack's team spent the day preparing the site and constructing the individual elements of the shelter such as the beautiful woven roof (made from split bamboo) the floor structure and main columns.                            

Both Bamboo Jack and Rufus Everitt (rnow rebranded as Rufarroo!) saw their shelters as an 'education' through practice with the participants learning hands on manual skills. By the end of the day both teams had learned enough skills on how to connect, cut and finish joints of their respective materials to fabricate basic structures. At a grouplevel the teams divided themselves into smaller groups in order to make the most of their skills and abilities, such as sourcing materials, preparing raw materials, fabricating structure or preparing the site.

Mick
MONDAY - 05 SEPTEMBER - 03:37 PM



DAY THREE 

The focus of the Sunday morning session was Recovery....

Bam had survived two millennia of earthquakes until a major one struck it and the surrounding Kerman province of southeastern Iran, Mojdeh Moasser gave us a fascinating look at the incrimental loss of indigenous building skills which contributed to the tragic loss of life and destruction in the Bam Earthquake in Iran. 

Annika Grafweg, lecturer at London Metropolitan University and consultant for the UN-Habitat, spoke about a recently drafted report on her knowledge and experience with Iraqi Internally Displace Persons (IDPs) . Her research focused on a national strategy of long-term shelter solutions for people affected by displacement. She presented the different options of relocation available to conflict affected communities.

Bea Munby followed up with an animated and personal account of her work as an architect/engineer in post-disaster reconstruction within SEEDS in India. She shared the challenges she faced throughout her eight months experience such as adapting to the culture, dealing with the language barrier, and understanding the local building traditions. 

Following this, the co-founder of Shelter Centre, Tom Corsellis, highlighted the importance of coordination in shelter responses and shared with us his experience within the shelter cluster in Haiti a couple of weeks after the earthquake. He also underlined some of the current projects of Shelter Centre such as their upcoming publications, their online library, and the Shelter Meeting.

To close morning, Dipti Hingorani spoke to us directly from Haiti, where she has been working for the last 8 months with CORDAID and CARITAS. Dipti, a former student and researcher at CENDEP - Oxford Brookes University - reflected on the gap between education of built environment professionals and the reality of practice post-disaster situations. 




 
Podcasts of the lectures will be available soon. 



Mick
SUNDAY - 04 SEPTEMBER - 11:10 PM




DAY TWO 

Our first lecture day was kicked of by Sarah Ernst who outlined the ethos of Architecture Sans Frontières-UK, the motivations for organising the school and did a quick exercise to find out the expectations of the participants. Caroline Dewast then gave the group an introduction to the disaster cycle in order to provide a context for the weekends talks around the themes of: REDUCTION/RELIEF/RECOVERY and RECONSTRUCTION.

The morning session focused on the REDUCTION element of engagement. 

Alex Towler's talk 'No disaster is natural' focussed on the structural issues in society which creates vulnerability through inequality and inept policies; for instance Alex's talk looked at the damaging fallout from Structural Adjustment Programmes (SAP) which remodel the economies of developing nations to effectively create cheap centralised sources of labour for the global market.  

Dr. Ling and Dr. Tabayashi presented 'A view on the Japanese Earthquake' [Live from Tokyo]. Dr. Ling is a climate policy researcher and entrepreneur, with extensive experience in scientific research, environmental and energy policy and media. He talked about the most recent Japanese earthquake, tsunami and nuclear  event, exploring the scale of the destruction in relation to the level on the richter scale and describing the Japanese response. 

Sarah Ernst and Andy Edwards followed with a talk about a guide to safer and more sustainable construction practices which has been developed by Architecture Sans Frontieres-UK in collaboration with partners SEEDS India. The guide draws on established principles and locally specific examples, proposing more safe and environmentally and socially sustainable construction practices.

They were followed by a live link-up with Anshu Sharma [Live from India] who talked from his experience of working with SEEDS India about the ingenuity of the vernacular. Anshu reflected on how the work of SEEDS has changed over the past 5 years since the first summer school he attended in 2006. 


The afternoon session's theme was RELIEF...

John Elliot, a post-doctoral researcher in Geophysics at the University of Oxford kicked off the afternoon's session with a technical talk entitled 'Disasters and Resilience seen in recent Global Earthquakes'. He explained his main research interest- measuring ground deformation due to an earthquake using satellites. He also explained how this can create a model of the faulting to see which areas underground have moved and which are still at risk from rupture. He talked through his recent work on earthquakes which have occurred across China, New Zealand and Haiti and how he aims to improve understanding of the nature of continental faulting and assessment of seismic hazard.

Jason Von Meding followed John [Live from Belfast] to talk about Disasters in Developed countries. His talk: 'Emergency Management in Developed Countries: an investigation of hazard risk, vulnerability and government response in the UK and & USA' showed the group the difference in disaster response in developed countries. 

Gareth Lewis, a qualified engineer joined the group to talk about his most recent work in Haiti whilst project managing transitional shelter reconstruction project with Haven.
 
Podcasts of the lectures will be available soon. 

Sarah
SATURDAY - 03 SEPTEMBER - 11:02 AM




DAY ONE 

A glorious day welcomed the participants to Cornwall and the Eden Project - many thanks to the team @ Eden who greeted us and showed us around the amazing site. Howard Jones - Director of Human Networks at the Eden Project outlined the strong connections between Eden and ASF-UK and highlighted the importance of the theme of this year's school.


In the afternoon, we got our first glimpse of our build sites and the materials that as part of the brief have been scavenged for. Even though it was later in the day, we were met by a wall of heat as we entered- temperatures inside this Biome can reach 32°. Under such conditions it will be challenging build for the team as they toil over their shelters - luckily for the sweaty team there is a 'fridge' to escape to! 
For information on what we will building you can check out the brief in the PROGRAMME section.



Mick
FRIDAY - 02 SEPTEMBER - 10:40 PM



ADDITIONS // UPDATES

APPLICATIONS ARE NOW CLOSED FOR THE 2011 ASF-UK EDEN PROJECT SUMMER SCHOOL. If you could not make it this year then you can keep track of the school via this website. For more information on upcoming ASF-UK workshops, lectures and events then visit our main website at www.asf-uk.org

.......A quick update on the PROGRAMME: we are happy to announce the addition of Dr.Frank Hiroshi Ling to our Saturday lectures. Frank Hiroshi is a climate policy researcher and entrepreneur. He has extensive experience in scientific research, environmental and energy policy, and media. Currently based in Japan, he is a researcher in climate adaptation at the Institute for Global Change Adaptation Science (ICAS) at Ibaraki University. He also works with IGES as an editor of the forthcoming book “Transition to Low Carbon, Climate Resilient Asia: Opportunities and Challenges. Frank will be speaking to us about the recent 2011 Tōhoku earthquake and tsunami in Japan. 

We have also added some more material to the READ + WATCH section including a paper on Structural adjustment, urban systems, and disaster vulnerability in developing countries and video of Mark Cutts from the United Nations Office for the Co-ordination of Humanitarian Affairs, who answers the question "why humanitarian reform?" 

You can find an extended brief for the workshops in the PROGRAMME section outlining the focus of the each team, there is also some reading material there that we recommend you digest.

.....finally a massive THANK YOU to Karen Dawkins and Neal Barnes at the Eden Project who have been beavering away with preparations in Cornwall ....including harvesting the bamboo for the build! 

....and remember for advice on how to get there and what to bring, you should have a look at our PLANNING TO GO section.

Mick
MONDAY - 29 AUGUST - 04:22PM



WELCOME TO OUR SUMMER SCHOOL BLOG!
The final touches are nearly in place,but we are still adding exciting speakers to the PROGRAMME; such as Annaka Grafweg who will be sharing her experiences of working with internally displaced persons in Iraq to achieve longer-term shelter solutions for people affected by the conflict.

There are also a handful of places left, SIGN UP now
to guarantee your place.

For advice on how to get there and what to bring with you and for frequently asked questions, you should have a look at our PLANNING TO GO section.

Mick
TUESDAY - 24 AUGUST - 11:22AM





© Architecture Sans Frontières 2011






SUMMER SCHOOL // 2011

PODCASTS


SARAH ERNST - WELCOME
 
 

DOWNLOAD PODCAST 5.11MB
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ANDY EDWARDS + SARAH ERNST
REDUCING RISK AND PROMOTING 
SUSTAINABILITY

 DOWNLOAD PODCAST 4.7MB
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DR.LING + DR.TABAYASHI 
A VIEW ON THE JAPANESE 
EARTHQUAKE

DOWNLOAD PODCAST 11.5 MB
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ALEX TOWLER 
NO DISASTER IS NATURAL
 

DOWNLOAD PODCAST 7.7 MB
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ANSHU SHARMA 
THE INGENUITY OF VERNACULAR
 

DOWNLOAD PODCAST 9.05 MB
 
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JOHN ELLIOT - GEOHAZARDS: 
DIASTERS & RESLIENCE SEEN 
IN RECENT GLOBAL EARTHQUAKES

DOWNLOAD PODCAST 21.8 MB
 
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CAROLINE DEWAST POST-DISASTER 
RECONSTRUCTION IN PISCO, PERU 
2007 /  TRANSITIONAL-SHELTER
 
DOWNLOAD PODCAST 8.4 MB

 

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JASON VON MEDING
 
EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT IN 
DEVELOPED COUNTRIES

DOWNLOAD PODCAST 5.11 MB
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GARETH LEWIS 
ENGINEERS WITHOUT BORDERS
 
 
DOWNLOAD PODCAST 5.11MB
 
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JOE CANNON
IMMEDIATE RESPONSE SHELTER


DOWNLOAD PODCAST 11.6 MB 
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MOJDEH MOASSER
BAM EARTH QUAKE -THE LONG
TERM VIEW.

DOWNLOAD PODCAST 5.11MB 
 
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ANNIKA GRAFWEG 
DRAFTING THE IRAQ NATIONAL
STRATEGY: LONGER-TERM SHELTER
SOLUTIONS
DOWNLOAD PODCAST 6.39 MB 
 
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BEA MUNBY
INDIA CASE STUDY-
AN EDUCATION IN UNDERSTANDING
PEOPLE AND PLACE
DOWNLOAD PODCAST 8.88 MB 
 
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TOM CORSELLIS
SHELTER CENTRE KNOWLEDGE
SHARING - THE IMPORTANCE OF
COMMUNICATION
 
DOWNLOAD PODCAST 4.9 MB 
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DIPTI HINGORANI
HAITI RECOVERY/
RECONSTRUCTION 
 
DOWNLOAD PODCAST 8.67 MB 
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SARAH ERNST+ ANDY EDWARDS  
ORISSA FLOOD RESILIENT
SHELTER PROGRAMME
 
DOWNLOAD PODCAST 4.9 MB 
 
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NATALIE DANIELS 
ENVIRONMENTAL PLANNING:
THE IMPORTANCE OF OUDOOR SPACE
DOWNLOAD PODCAST 10.4 MB 
 
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BAMBOO JACK  
BAMBOO:THE GREEN GOLD  

 
DOWNLOAD PODCAST 10.4 MB 
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