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Imperialism Trial (Camelio)

Created by Stacy Kitsis, Arlington High School Librarian. Last updated: January 14, 2015.

Assignment Introduction

From 1870-1914, industrialized countries of the world engaged in a race to carve up and colonize the non-industrialized countries around the globe. Today historians still debate the legacy of this imperialism. To further understand this debate and the legacy of imperialism, the class will engage in a mock trial to assess whether imperialism benefited or harmed the peoples of Africa and Asia.
This pathfinder is designed to help attorneys, witnesses, and jurors find the best resources for a successful trial. As always, if you have any questions, don't hesitate to ask Ms. Kitsis for help! 

Witnesses and Attorneys

Begin your research with subscription databases, focusing on reference articles. Then go deeper with websites, books, and more. 

Tip: Primary sources make great "evidence" in a courtroom. Consider photos, maps, historical documents, video, and more. Overview articles on imperialism can provide evidence for opening and closing statements. 

Recommended Databases

Passwords: Database passwords are available at the front desk and online (must be logged onto Spyponders to view). 
  • Encyclopaedia Britannica
    Great place to begin background research here. Search for countries (use the table of contents to locate the section on history) or people. 
  • Biography in Context (Gale) 
    Search for people. Tip: Watch out for alternate names and spellings! For example, try "Meiji" as well as "Emperor Mutsuhito" and "Lobengula" as well as "Lo Bengula."
  • World History in Context (Gale) 
    Excellent database for research on imperialism.
  • Modern World History Online (Facts on File)
    Another great database for world history, drawing from different sources than the one above. Watch out, citations in this one are in Chicago format. 
  • World Geography and Culture Online (Facts on File) 
    Not as much depth as the databases above, but each country has a historical overview and really helpful timeline. Countries are listed under their current names. 
Recommended Websites
  • Country Studies (Library of Congress)
    Use the drop down menu to select your country, then the search bar for more specific results.  
  • Internet History Sourcebook (Fordham University)
    Great primary sources. Overview of imperialism followed by sections on China, India, Africa, the Middle East, Japan, and America. 
  • Casahistoria.net
    Links collected by a history teacher. Not the easiest to navigate, but includes some terrific finds. 
  • British Library
    Potential source for images of primary sources. 
Books and e-Books
  • Media Center Catalog
    We have books! Don't be shy, ask Ms. Kitsis for help. 
  • Minuteman Library Catalog
    Set your library location to Arlington to view materials currently available at the Robbins Library. 
  • Project Gutenberg
    This site contains thousands of free e-books in the public domain. 
  • Internet Archive
    The Internet Archive also has free e-books in a variety of formats, including PDF and EPUB. Download directly to your mobile device! 

Jurors

Bonus: Download the juror worksheet and type your answers directly into it. Just be sure to SAVE THE FILE to your documents folder before you begin so you don't lose your work!  

Passwords: Database passwords are available at the front desk and online (must be logged onto Spyponders to view). 

Resources for the Role of Jurors
Resources for Imperialism
  • Encyclopaedia Britannica
    Great place to begin background research. Search for countries (use the table of contents to locate the section on history) or people. 
  • Biography in Context (Gale)
    Search for people. Tip: Watch out for alternate names and spellings for international figures. For example, try "Meiji" as well as "Emperor Mutsuhito" and "Lobengula" as well as "Lo Bengula."
  • World History in Context (Gale) 
    Excellent database for research on imperialism.
  • Modern World History Online (Facts on File)
    Another great database for world history, drawing from different sources than the previous one. Password required.
If you finish with the resources suggested here, review the websites in the Witnesses and Attorneys section of the pathfinder above. 

Search Tips

Search for alternate names ... and your spelling. Try "Meiji" as well as "Emperor Mutsuhito" and "Lobengula" as well as "Lo Bengula." Remember that many countries and cities have had different names throughout history, especially before, during, and after imperialism. And if you don't find anything, check that sloppy spelling is not to blame! 

Combine keywords to get articles that match each of your important concepts. For example, if you are researching the effects of imperialism in India, and don't want to be overwhelmed with EVERYTHING about India, you might add: 

India AND imperialism

Use quotation marks to find complete phrases, especially proper names and titles. For example:

"Manifest Destiny" or "Exclusion Act" 

Use truncation. An advanced technique, but in most databases: 

immigra* will find immigrant, immigrants, immigration, etc.

Consider your scope. How narrow or broad is the focus of your topic? Will you struggle with finding enough information ... or too much? 

Citing Sources & Academic Integrity

The school has purchased a paid subscription to EasyBib.com for all students, and we encourage you to use this tool to create and manage your citations, notes, and outlines when working on research projects. 

Screen shot of EasyBib

Go to EasyBib.com, click Register, and then Sign in Using Your Account with Google. Use your school Spyponders account for a unified password and streamlined communication with your teachers. 

EasyBib Registration Page

You should see the "Pro" and "For Institutions" blue tags at the top of your screen. If not, ask Ms. Kitsis for the coupon code to upgrade. 

Smart Research Tip: Remember that databases provide citations at the bottom of each article that can usually be copied and pasted into EasyBib with some minor modifications. 

Additional resources for academic integrity and citation: 

Scales of Justice

How will history judge the imperialists? Their legacy is in your hands. 
Scales of justice

ĉ
Stacy Kitsis,
Jan 17, 2013, 6:13 AM
Ċ
Stacy Kitsis,
Jan 12, 2015, 12:30 PM