Dr. Richard Swinburne

     November 14th and 15th, 2013 @ 7pm, Munson Chapel
 

Richard G. Swinburne is a British philosopher of religion.He is an Emeritus Professor of Philosophy at the University of Oxford. Over the last 50 years Swinburne has been a very influential proponent of philosophical arguments for the existence of God. His philosophical contributions are primarily in philosophy of religion and philosophy of science. He aroused much discussion with his early work in the philosophy of religion, a trilogy of books consisting of The Coherence of Theism, The Existence of God, and Faith and Reason.

See below for suggested readings for the lecture series

Oxford Philosophy:
http://users.ox.ac.uk/~orie0087/
About Richard G Swinburne: 


Topic for the lecture series:  God and Christian Morality

Thursday, November 14th at 7:00 pm
--God and Morality
Many philosophers claim that whether some action is morally good or bad, obligatory or wrong does not depend in any way on whether there is a God and whether he has told us what to do. Many religious believers claim that no action could be morally good or bad, obligatory or wrong unless there is a God and he has told us what to do. This lecture defends a mid-way position, that while some actions would still be morally good or bad, obligatory or wrong, even if there were no God, nevertheless the existence and commands of God make a great difference to which actions are morally good etc, how we can know which actions are morally good, and how important it is to do actions which are morally good. Also, if there is a God, he can help us to do good, and forgive us when we fail.

Friday, November 15th at 7:00 pm
--Why a Christian life is the best possible life
God has revealed through Jesus Christ how he wants us to live – to worship him and ask him for things, to tell other people about him, to serve our fellow humans in many of the ways secular morality also recognises as good, to treat human life as sacred, to tell the truth and keep promises, to live a life pure in our family relations, and to follow the  special vocation God has for each of us. God has sound reasons for wanting us to live in this way. If we believe that there is a God, then we are indeed be blameworthy if we fail to live in this way. But even if we are agnostic, it could still be good for us to live in this way -  it’s worth taking a risk to obtain great goals in this life and the next life, which can be obtained in no other way.

Location: Azusa Pacific University, Munson Chapel, http://www.apu.edu/maps/popup/?id=0:0:23:0

Attached below are suggested readings for the lecture series:

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Laura Smith Webb,
Jul 15, 2013, 1:02 PM
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Laura Smith Webb,
Jul 15, 2013, 1:02 PM
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Laura Smith Webb,
Jul 23, 2013, 8:10 AM
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Laura Smith Webb,
Jul 23, 2013, 11:33 AM
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Laura Smith Webb,
Jul 23, 2013, 8:09 AM