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The Great Barrier Land Harbour and Mining Company 1857-1868

 
1857 
Notice of prospectus having been issued for the Great Barrier Land Harbour and Mining Company

Money-Market & City Intelligence

            The prospectus has been issued of the Great Barrier Land Harbour and Mining Company with a capital of £50,000 in £5 shares. The object is to develop a land and copper mining property of 24,269  acres called the Great Barrier estate, situated on the coast within 55 miles of Auckland, New Zealand. The sum to be given for it is £30,000, one third in paid-up shares.

Source: The Times, Thursday, May 7th 1857. Page 7. Issue 22674


1858 

Notice of first General Meeting of the Great Barrier Land Harbour and Mining Company

Classified Advertising

The Great Barrier Land Harbour and Mining Company (Limited) - Notice is hereby given that the FIRST GENERAL MEETING of shareholders of this Company will be held on Friday the 7th day of May, 1858 at No. 9, Great Winchester street, in the city of London, at 1 o’clock precisely.

            By order of the Directors,    J.H. Murchison, Sec.

Source: The Times, Monday, April 26th, 1858 page 5. Issue 22977.

 

1859 

Notice by the Great Barrier Land Harbour and Mining Company of a call on shares

The Great Barrier Land Harbour and Mining Company (Ltd) - Notice is hereby given, that a CALL of 10s per share has been made on the shares in the above Company PAYABLE at the Commercial Bank of London, Lothbury, in the city of London, on Saturday, the 13th day of April, 1859.

                                    By the order of the Directors

                                                J.H. Murchison, Secretary.

117, Bishopsgate street within, April 4, 1859.

Source: The Times, Wednesday April 6th, 1859, page 4. Issue 23273.

 

 

Notice of a dividend issue by the Great Barrier Land Harbour and Mining Company.

Money-Market & City Intelligence

            At a meeting of the Great Barrier Land Harbour and Mining Company today, Colonel Bazalgette, in the chair, a dividend was declared, at the rate of 10 per cent, on all shares issued prior to the 1st of March. The balance of profit for the past year was £1,722 , and, after providing for the dividend and certain appropriations for the reserve fund, directors’ remuneration, etc., a sum of £27 remains to be carried forward.

Source: The Times Tuesday, May 31st, 1859, page 5. Issue 23320

Great Barrier Island Land Harbour and Mining Company buy Great Barrier estate off Theophilus Heale
In June, 1859 Theophilus Heale sold his property to the Great Barrier Land Harbour and Mining Company for 20,000 pounds.
Source: Cyril Moor's 1987 book 'Early Settlement of Port Fitzroy, Great Barrier Island' p32 
 
1861

Departure of barque Mersey with steam boilers for the Barrier.

English Shipping

Departures for New Zealand

February 19, the Mersey, from London, for Auckland.

Source: Nelson Examiner & New Zealand Chronicle 27 April 1861, p2

 

At a meeting of the Great Barrier Land Harbour and Mining Company the report stated that the property of the company was satisfactorily advancing in importance and value. Active preparations have been made by the lessee for the erection of the saw mill under the late agreement, and from the profitable character of other undertakings of a similar description a good return is expected from this source. The farms are said to be looking well. Owing to the cost of developing the mine being larger than the capital that can be devoted to this purpose out of limited resources of the company, the exploring operations have been temporarily suspended.

Source: The Times [London] 1st June 1861 p5


Arrival of barque Mersey with steam boilers for the Barrier.

Shipping Intelligence

Port of Auckland

Foreign

June 10 - Mersey, barque, 751 tons, Duncan Smith, from London - Brown & Campbell, agents.

 

6 drums, 3 bndls 67 bars iron, 2 boilers, 4 parts chimney, 1 case, 5000 bricks, Order - Brown & Campbell, agents.

Source: Daily Southern Cross, 11 June, 1861, p2

Note: Sometime after arrival at Auckland, the barque went to the Barrier and off-loaded the boilers.

 


 

GREAT BARRIER LAND, HARBOUR, AND MINING COMPANY.

The fourth ordinary general meeting of shareholders was held on Friday at the offices of 'the company; Colonel Bazalgette presided.  Mr. J. H. Murchison, F.G.S., the secretary, submitted the report of the directors, which was to the effect that in their circular of January last, the directors informed the proprietors of the agreement which had been entered into for the erection and working of a sawmill on the harbour, the same being leased for seven years, and that the company had also granted the leasee the right for the same period to cut timber in its extensive kauri forest, receiving a royalty of one fourth. The whole of the necessary machinery has since been sent out, and the first parts of it must, ere this, be near their destination. The tenant had been making active preparations, and the directors were informed that further exploration of the forest proved the timber to be much more abundant than was even at first supposed; and seeing that large profits were made from similar undertaking in New Zealand, the directors felt justified in anticipating, ere long, a very handsome return from this source. Rapid progress was being made in the farming stations, and in November last there were employed on the whole estate nearly 100 men. In considering this fact, it was to be remembered that the property had not yet been two years in the possession of the company. The directors had repeatedly drawn attention to the fine harbour so conveniently situated in the company's property, and to the great importance of taking steps to encourage the American whalers and the coasters to call there, and thus lead to the establishment of a trade, and ultimately a town. The directors were informed if there was a general ship store on the harbour many ships would make it their port of call, and most likely lead to the results anticipated. The Chairman having stated that the most active and important works were in operation for the full development of the resources of their property, concluded by moving the adoption of the report, which was carried unanimously. Colonel Bazalgette and Mr. Barber, the retiring directors were re-elected; and Mr J. V. N. Bazalgette and Mr. C. Hancock were re-appointed auditors. A special vote of thanks to the chairman and directors for the efficient manner in which they had conducted the affairs of the company, concluded the proceedings — Australian and New Zealand Gazette, June 8.

Source: Daily Southern Cross, Volume XVII, Issue 1431, 30 August 1861, Page 4
 

Court case over boilers being oversized when loading in London.

Court of Queens Bench, Guildhall, December 10.

Great Barrier Land, Harbour, and Mining Company (Limited)) v Gann and another.

 

Mr Lamb QC and Mr Pollock appeared for the plaintiffs; Mr Sargeant Shee and Mr Honeyman were counsel for the defendants.

The plaintiffs are gentlemen who have formed a joint-stock company for the purpose of carrying out a land and mining speculation at the island of Otea, or Great Barrier Island, north of Cape Colville, New Zealand, and the defendants Messrs Willis, Gann and Company are the well-known shipbrokers of London. Early in the present year the directors of the company contracted the defendants to convey two boilers, each weighing from eight to ten tons, some funnels, and 5000 bricks to Port Fitzroy in the ship Mersey for £300. When the boilers were delivered at East India Docks they were found to exceed the stipulated dimensions, and the deck of the vessel had to be cut away to a greater extent than was anticipated, in order to allow them to pass into the hold. The funnels also, which were represented as going inside the boilers, required separate stowage, and Messrs Willis and Gann, therefore increased the charge for freights from £300 to £398-9s-6d. The directors paid the £98-9s-6d under protest, and brought this action for its recovery.

            The case occupied the whole day, and ended in a verdict for the plaintiffs.

Source: The Times, Wednesday, December 11, 1861 Issue 24113.

 

1862 

Great Barrier Land, Harbour & Mining Company (Ltd)

Arrangements have been made for the present with the Masters of the cutters "Rose" and "Shamrock" for the carriage of all passengers and freight between Auckland and the ports owned by this Company in the Great Barrier Island.

As the operations of the Company are not yet sufficiently extensive to afford work for other vessels, the undersigned gives the above notice in order that the Masters or Owners of such vessels may not be disappointed in seeking freights for Auckland.

Auckland                              Albert J. Allom

17 January 1862                   General Manager & Agent.

Source: New Zealander Saturday 18th January, 1862


THE GREAT BARRIER COMPANY. (LIMITED.)

The Great Barrier Land, Harbour, and Mining Company (Limited), although well known in the English share market, is comparatively unknown in this province. The older settlers, no doubt are familiar with the facts in relation to the mining operations on the Great Barrier island ; but few of the later arrivals have given the subject any consideration, or have had the means of ascertaining the nature of these operations for themselves. We purpose directing attention to this Company at the present time, not with the view of writing a retrospective narrative of the working of the mines, or of the manner in which the estate ultimately came into the possession of a joint-stock company, incorporated under the provisions of the Limited Liability Act, 1856, but solely to inform the public of the nature and aim of the works about to be begun and continued on the Great Barrier Island, and which must largely affect Auckland if the anticipations of the Company be at all realised. The Great Barrier Company are in possession of a freehold estate of about 26,000 acres on the Great Barrier island, about 55 miles from Auckland. This property has been in their possession rather more than two years, and being desirous to turn it to the best account, the trustees and directors have sent out to this colony a gentleman under whose management they hope to deyelop the wealth which they reasonably believe their estate will yield if judiciously dealt with. Mr.Allom has now gone to the Great Barrier to carry out his plans in detail, and we may therefore write the more freely on the subject. It would hardly be fair to state that the most important feature in these plans is that of developing the minerals, but undoubtedly this is one element in the operations of the Company on which its success must depend. The copper mine on this estate has been worked already with varying success. The quality of the ore is superior, as shown by the price it fetched in the English market; and Captain Ninnis reported in 1855, that there was little difficulty in working the mine and obtaining ore of an average value of £30 to a cubic fathom. This mineral wealth, which amounts to many thousand tons of ore, singularly free from mundic, will yield handsome revenue, and provide employment for a considerable body of miners. But the operations at the copper mines were lately suspended, owing to the Company requiring their remaining capital for the development and improvement of the estate, in the clearing of land, and purchase of sheep and cattle. There is no doubt but the managers of the Company looked upon the mines as of rather a speculative character, judging from past results ; but the observation of practical men warrants a further trial, as they state, in corroboration of what Captain Ninnis reported, that there are indications that lead to the belief that it will be very valuable, and a capital of from £30,000 to £50,000 will be forthcoming, we have been led to understand, within the next six months to give these mines a fair trial. We rejoice at this, for our belief is, from the information we have received, that the mines have never been fairly tried. But the Company have set themselves assiduously to the reclamation of the property, with the view of making it useful for the sustenance of life. Farms have been established at Kaikoura — an island breakwater in the harbour of Port Fitzroy — Mohunga, Kaiarara, and Kiwiriki. These are but beginnings and although the experiment has been successful hitherto, a large additional outlay of capital will yet be necessary to create a speedy return, which might be looked for in the future, in the natural order of things. Several thousand pounds sterling have already been expended in establishing these farms. There is an extensive forest of kauri pine on the estate of the Great Barrier Company, from whence there is water-carriage down the Kaiarara river to the harbour of Port Fitzroy. The company are now erecting a steam saw-mill at a point where there is about fourteen feet water, so as to avail themselves of the timber, and to afford easy means of shipment. A great deal of firewood also finds its way from the Great Barrier to Auckland, and steps have been taken to develop to its utmost this trade, so that there will be a constant intercourse between this city and the island. Another thing which the Company have set themselves to accomplish, is the formation of a settlement from which, more especially, the whalers may obtain supplies. Allotments, in the township and farms adjoining, will be leased to desirable settlers on favourable terms, and every effort will be made to induce the whalers to call at Port Fitzroy and obtain fresh meat, vegetables, and ship stores, instead of going north to the Bay of Islands. No doubt if such a community was located on the Great Barrier there would be little difficulty in the way of repairs, as shipwrights always find their way to newly formed seaports. This will depend very much, however, on the success that attends the establishment of farms and in clearing the estate, as well as in the concentration of a mining population in the island. At any events the undertaking deserves attention at our hands. It is closely identified with our own prosperity; and in the event of the establishment of the Panama route, we do not believe there is any great stretch of imagination in supposing that the Great Barrier island, looking at its position, will be fixed on as the steam packet station, or port of call, on the route between Sydney and Panama.

Source: Daily Southern Cross  7th February, 1862  p5 

TENDERS for cutting about 1,000 Tons of FIREWOOD, more or less, at Port Fitzroy, Great Barrier Island, will be received by the undersigned, addressed to the care of Messrs. Owen and Graham, Queen-street, not later than 12 o'clock, noon, on WEDNESDAY next, the 15th instant The Tender must state the sum per ton at which the party tendering will engage to cut and stack the wood just above high water-mark, in places which will be pointed out, convenient for shipment. The undersigned will not bind himself to accept the lowest or any Tender. ALBERT JAMES ALLOM, General Manager & Agent of the Great Barrier, Land, Harbour, and Mining Co., Limited 

Source: Daily Southern Cross  10th February, 1862  p1


First publication of share offering of ‘The Otea Copper Mining Company’

Classified advertising

The Otea Copper Mining Company (Limited).

            In 25000 shares, of 2 each, 5s per share to be paid with application and 5s per share on allotment. Under the Act of Parliament each shareholder is liable only for the amount he subscribed for.

Directors

Col. Bazalgette, Esq., Chairman of the Great Barrier Land Harbour and Mining Company (Ltd).

Charles Martin Esq., (Messrs Blogg and Martin) Bucklersbury.

Parke Pittar Esq., (Messrs P. Pittar and Co.) 26 Gresham St.

Joseph Thompson Esq., 43 Glocester Terrace, Hyde Park.

Philip Wright Esq., late of Auckland, New Zealand.

Solicitors- Messrs Bischoff, Coxe and Bompas, 19 Coleman St. E.C.  

Consulting Mining Engineers - Messrs Phillips and Darlington, Moorgate Street Chambers, Moorgate    Street, E.C.

Bankers - Bank of London, Threadneedle Street, E.C.

Auditors- To be appointed at the first General Meeting.

Brokers - London, Messrs J.C. and C.W. Morice, 4 Warnfordcourt, E.C. Manchester, J. Gorton Esq., Newmarket Chambers, Aberdeen, H. C. Oswald Esq., Marischall St.

Secretary and Offices - J.H. Murchison Esq., 117 Bishopsgate Street.

within

            The object of this company is to purchase and work a copper mine situate of the north of the Great Barrier Island, New Zealand at present the property of the Great Barrier Land Harbour and Mining Company (Ltd).

            The operations hitherto carried on have been on a limited scale and chiefly above the adit level, nevertheless nearly £30,000 worth of copper ore has been sold from the mine.

            To supply the necessary machinery, and to open out the mine properly so as to yield remunerative results demands more capital than the Great Barrier Company is in a position to lay out, that company requiring its resources for the development and improvement of its larger estate.

            At the office can be seen the Reports and letters of experienced practical authorities, three of whom have recently carefully inspected the mine. Captain Holman estimates (in his report of 21st March 1861) that there are probably “Over 3000 tons of ore, fully 15 per cent for copper, available” above the adit level. In his letters of 28th May and 27th November 1861, he increases his estimate of the possible yield of this ore ground to 4000 tons, if the powerful crusher he recommends be erected.

            The lode has been sunk upon for 20 fathoms under the adit; and Captain Holman says that, “if only a permanent increase in the yield of ores takes place throughout the vein, such as seen in the 12-fathom level, where the quality of the ores is quite equal to the general shipments, the future value of the mine would be very great.”

            Capt. Holman also remarks that in working the mine, “the materials required will be few in number. Steel for borers, with powder and fuze, include the chief items for quarrying. On the dressing floors steel hammers and sledges, with riddling and jigging sieves; for the crusher the usual wearing parts; while, for the engine, wood is abundant and easily procured.

            The value to be attached to Capt. Holman’s statements and opinions can be inferred from the very high testimonial in his favour by Mr Humphry  Willyams, the well-known copper smelter, given at the end of this prospectus. It  will be seen that Mr Willyams expresses himself in strong terms, founded on his knowledge of Capt. Holman for many years, and his employment of him on many occasions in all parts of the world.

            Captain Rowe states that “the shaft, which has also been sunk on the course of the lode, has throughout been in orey ground of more than average quality. The level (12 below adit) has been driven in a zig-zag direction, and whenever it has intersected the lode the ground has been of the usual character, but beyond the point where it communicates with the shaft there is decided improvement. The lode itself appears to be more concentrated and the ground favourable.”  He strongly recommends that the shaft should be sunk 50 fathoms, “as there cannot be two opinions, but that present appearances indicate improvement in these directions.” And he considers that “but a slight improvement in the lode to make the Barrier an exceedingly valuable mining property.” He also believes that “there are thousands of tons of ore that may be returned profitably.”

            Capt. Treuren states “It is seldom that in Cornwall better indications (at depth of the adit) for a profitable mine are found: the depth of the adit is about 30fms, and I believe the 20 fms of that would come away on tribute…..I feel confident that the large quantity of ore already obtained from the mine cannot be there alone, and from the ground now opened, I believe a great quantity of ore can still be raised.”

            The whole of the papers and reports respecting the mine having been laid before Captain James Richards (the Managing Agent of the celebrated Devon Great Console Mines), his report on the same can also be seen at the office. He remarks, “As far as I can judge from the different reports, and especially from the one published in the Mining Journal of 20th July (Captain Rowe’s report) I think this mine holds out more than the ordinary chances of success.”

            The mine being close to the sea, the ore is at once put from the dressing floors into barges which takes it alongside the ships, consequently there is no land carriage, generally a very heavy item in the costs of foreign and colonial mines, while the freight home (in the wool ships) has varied from only 2s6d to 12s6d per ton, making the mine, in these respects, like one at home, with the additional great advantage that the quality of the ore is more than double the average of that of the copper ores of this country.

            A provisional agreement has been made with the Great Barrier Company for transferring the mine and plant (including two steam engines) with 300 acres of land to this company, on the following very moderate terms, namely £15000 (5000 paid-up shares, and £5000 in money) and a royalty of 1/20th on the ores sold. The Great Barrier Company intend to retain these paid-up shares as an investment.

            All preliminary, legal, and other expenses up to and including registration, promotion of the company, and broker’s commission, have been defined and agreed for at 5 per cent, upon the nominal capital of the Company.

            As soon as the necessary capital is subscribed for, the requisite machinery will be ordered and sent out. It is also proposed to appoint Captain Holman the Managing Agent of the operations, which he has offered to undertake at a reasonable salary, and as he is already in the colony the expense of sending out an agent will be saved, and no time be lost in carrying out the objects of the company.

            Looking, therefore, at the large quantity of productive ground already laid open (which by Capt. Holman’s estimate of the quantity of ground its produce may be valued at about £50,000, the quality of the ore, the advantage as to carriage and freight, and the short time required to put the mine in full work on a greatly extended scale, it is evident that such an opportunity seldom presents itself for obtaining early and highly remunerative results.

            The Company is divided into 25,000 shares of £2 each, and being established under the Limited Liability Act, no shareholder will be liable for more than the amount he subscribes for. A deposit  of 5s per share is to be paid in to the bankers, who will give a receipt for the same, and the application for shares in the accompanying form can then be sent to the office or to the brokers. A further sum of 5s per share will have to be paid on allotment but in case no shares are allotted and unless at least one half of the shares are subscribed for, the deposit will be returned in full. If only part of the shares applied for are allotted the balance of the deposit will be applied towards the second 5s on the number allotted. No further call will be made for at least 12 months, and it is believed the £10,000 will be ample to fully develop the mine, leaving a large capital in reserve to meet any contingencies, and if found desirable to smelt the ores, or reduce them to regulus in the colony.

            A large number of the shares being already taken, applications (in the form annexed to the prospectus) may be made for the remainer which will be allotted in the order they are applied for.

            The Directors will be prepared to receive applications from parties desirous of paying up their calls in full, on which interest will be allowed at the rate of 5 per cent per annum. Prospectuses with forms of application for shares can be obtained at the office or from the brokers.

            Among other testimonials in favour of Capt. Holman the following have been received from Mr Humphry Willyams, banker, Truro, and a partner in the well-known copper smelting firm of Messrs Sims, Willyams and Co.

                                                            Carnanton, 5th October, 1861.

            It gives me great pleasure to reply satisfactorily to your inquiry about Capt. Holman. I have known him for a great many years and have employed him on many occasions and in all parts of the world. He is an extremely intelligent, judicious and trustworthy man - sober and honest ton the fullest extent, and I consider him to be fully competent to be entrusted with the management of any mining undertaking.

                                                                        H. Willyams.

 

                                                                        Miner’s Bank, Truro, 23rd October, 1861

            I sincerely wish for your success in your proposed undertaking, and I take the present opportunity of confirming my previously expressed opinion of the judgement and ability of Capt. Holman of which I have had many years experience.

                                                                        H. Willyams

                                                           

                                                                        Truro 6th November, 1861.

            You are at perfect liberty to publish my letter respecting Capt. Holman. My opinion of him exceeds what I have expressed on paper.

                                                                        H. Willyams

J.H.Murchison Esq.

Source: The Times Wednesday, May 14th, 1862, page 4. Issue 24245.

 

 

 

The Otea Copper Mining Company advertises shares

Classified advertising.

The Otea Copper Mining Company (Limited).

- In 25,000 shares of £2 each. 5s per share  to be paid with application, and 5s per share on allotment. Under the Act of Parliament each shareholder is liable only for the amount he subscribes for.

                                                Directors

Col. Bazalgette, Chairman of the Great Barrier Land Harbour and Mining Company (Ltd).

Charles Martin Esq., (Messrs Blogg and Martin) Bucklersbury.

Parke Pittar Esq., (Messrs P.Pittar & Co) 25 Gresham Street.

Joseph Thompson Esq., 43 Glocester Terrace, Hyde Park.

Philip Wright Esq., late of Auckland, New Zealand.

Solicitors- Messrs Bischoff, Coxe, and Bompas, 19 Coleman Street, E.C.

Consulting Mining Engineers - Messrs Philips and Darlington, Moorgate St Chambers, Moorgate E.C.

Bankers - Bank of London, Threadneedle Street, E.C.

Auditors- To be appointed at the first General Meeting.

Brokers - London, Messrs J.C. and C.W. Morice, 4 Warnfordcourt, E.C. Manchester, J. Gorton Esq., Newmarket Chambers, Aberdeen, H. C. Oswald Esq., Marischall St.

Secretary and Offices - J.H. Murchison Esq., 117 Bishopsgate Street.

                        Within

ABRIDGED PROSPECTUS

The object of this company is to purchase and work a copper mine situate of the north of the Great Barrier Island, New Zealand, and from which nearly £30,000 worth of copper ore has already been sold.

            The ore still available above the adit level alone is estimated at 4000 tons, of full 15 per cent produce or at  even present low prices nearly £50,000, and with proper development in depth is confidently believed that the property will become “exceedingly valuable”.

            There is no land carriage (a very heavy item of expense in almost all foreign and colonial mines) and the freight to London, in the wool ships, varies from 2s6d to 12s 6d per ton.

            More powerful machinery, and a different and extended system of working are required to make the mine remunerative, for which purpose capital is now being raised.

            There are 25000 shares of £2 each, a deposit of 5s per share to be paid with the application and also 5s on allotment; no further call to be made for at least 12 months.

            A Considerable number of the shares being already taken, applications (in the form annexed to the prospectus) may be made for the remainder, which will be allotted in the order they are applied for.

            Detailed prospectuses with forms of application for shares can be obtained at the office, or from the brokers.

 

Source: The Times Friday, May 23rd, 1862 p4. Issue 24253.


Money-Market and City Intelligence

“Great Barrier (New Zealand).

“The company have despatches including copy of the provincial surveyor’s report to the Colonial Government on the Crown Lands, of which the following is a copy:-

“With the operations of the Great Barrier Company advancing the land about Tryphena harbour and Okupe [sic] will before long be required for settlements, and I have prepared the report and map with a view to having data ready…..The most valuable portion of the Great Barrier Island lies around Port Abercrombie, and is owned by the Great Barrier Company. In the bays of this harbour and of Port Fitzroy are located settlers, who hold their farms on lease from the Company, and keep stock on shares of the increase and produce. The grass cultivation of some of these farms are very luxuriant, and the enterprise appears a successful one.”

Source: The Times (London)   Monday, September 15th, 1862. p5.

Wanted, an Experienced and Competent Person to Erect a Steam Saw Mill on this Company’s Estate. Satisfactory references required. 

Apply in writing to the undersigned, care of Messrs Owen and Graham, Queen st Wharf 
Albert J Allom 
General Manager and Agent 
Daily Southern Cross 15th August 1862 p1

Great Barrier Land, Harbour, and Mining Company, Limited.

WANTED, an experienced and Competent Person to erect a Steam Saw Mill on this Company's Estate. Satisfactory references required — Apply in writing to the undersigned, care of Messrs. Owen and Graham, Queen-street Wharf. ALBERT J ALLOM, General Manager and Agent.

 

TO FISH CURERS.

Great Barrier Land Harbour and Mining Company, Limited.

THE Undersigned would be glad to meet with some respectable person who understands and

would be disposed to enter into the employment of taking and CURING FISH, as an experiment, for the Auckland market. The company finding boats and materials — Apply to Messrs. Owen and Graham, Queen-street Wharf. ALBERT J. ALLOM, General Manager and Agent.

Source: Daily Southern Cross 20th August 1862 p1


1863 

Report from Manager to London directors Of Great Barrier Land Harbour and Mining Company.

Money Market & City Intelligence

Thursday evening

“Great Barrier” New Zealand

“The directors have despatches from their manager to the 20th of October. He reports the progress in the erection of the sawmill as most satisfactory. It is expected that the sawmill will be ready to be worked by the end of March, or sooner. The manager proposed to have not less than 500,000ft of timber ready for it as a commencement. With regard to the farms the sheep are increasing considerably in value, both as to quantity and price. The question of the Panama route is again being generally agitated in the colony. It is considered the Port Fitzroy, on the Great Barrier Island, would be in the most direct line of route as the port of call for New Zealand. The local papers give a report on the subject by Colonel Smyth, who states that the direct line from Sydney to Panama, vid Auckland, would be augmented by about 100 miles by the necessity of having to round the northern extremity of New Zealand. It appears that 50 miles of this would be saved by having the terminus at the Great Barrier Island (say at Port Fitzroy); and, moreover, the risk, difficulty, and delay of having to navigate the narrow entrance to the Waitemata would be avoided. This, to a large ocean steamer, would be of great importance. The manager of the company considers that no other port in New Zealand offers such facilities for the suggested line of steamers to call at. He adds that Port Fitzroy would easily float the Great Eastern.”

Source: The Times January 16, 1863 Page 5, Issue 24457

 

 

Great Barrier Is Land Harbour and Mining Company propose to raise capital

Money Market and City Intelligence

At a general meeting of the Great Barrier Company (New Zealand) today it was unanimously agreed to raise £20,000 by debentures for five years at 6 per cent per annum. The objects on which it is proposed to expend this money are to improve the present farms and establish others, to considerably increase the stock of sheep and cattle, extent the fish curing establishments, purchase a suitable vessel, and to place the directors in a position to carry out the project of a special settlement, if favourable terms are offered by the Government; and also for making the necessary preparations for rendering the company’s harbour, Port Fitzroy, a fitting port for steamers and other vessels, as well as  a depot for whalers. It was stated that the sawmill is probably now at work, and that from this source a good return may henceforth be expected.

Source: The Times Wednesday, April 22, 1863, page 10 issue 24589.



THE GREAT BARRIER LAND, HARBOUR, AND MINING COMPANY. (FROM THE "MINING JOURNAL," APRIL 25)

We would draw attention to the report of the proceedings of the extraordinary general meeting of the Great Barrier Company, which appears in another column. The undertaking is evidently one of unusual importance, and possesses numerous sources from which considerable returns may be confidently expected. The saw-mill is, probably, now at work, and a contract has been made for cutting 1,000,000 ft. of kauri timber, at the rate of 100,000 ft. per month, in the company's Wairahi forest ; and this was independent of what was doing in the Kaiaiara forest. This part of the undertaking is likely, therefore, to yield a large return henceforth. Within the last two years the price of kauri timber has risen about 50 per cent, and it is likely to be maintained. The farms progress, and the sheep and cattle increase in number and value; but these farms should be improved, and others established, while the stock of sheep should be considerably increased, a large profit being certain from them. It is also proposed to endeavour to obtain from tho Government a grant of the Crown lands on the Great Barrier Island, in consideration of the company introducing a certain number of suitable emigrants from Europe, and establishing a special settlement. This would largely extend the company's freehold property, and at the same time cause the whole to become of much greater value. The more regular supply of labour, the increased demand for the produce of the farms, and the greatly enhanced value of the land, and the certainty of obtaining grants of more land, a full or nearly full, compensation for the outlay in sending out and settling the emigrants, are self-evident arguments in favour of a well considered plan of this nature. There is also the question of the company's harbour of Port Fitzroy, considered one of the finest in the world, and by far the most convenient and advantageous for the port of call for the steamers, in case the proposed route, via Central America, is carried out. Captain Bedford Pim, R.N., in his recent work  the "Gate of the Pacific," remarks, "The terminus in New Zealand, which lies within the shortest line of passage, is undoubtedly the Great Barrier Island,"  Mr. Heaphy, the provincial land surveyor, states that the Barrier is preferable to any other port in New Zealand for the above purpose, it being " the most suitable place for steamers to call." The directors wisely see the immense importance of this, and are desirous to be in a position to take advantage of any opportunity which may present itself of having their harbour selected for the New Zealand port of call. The company is in £10,000 shares of £5 each, upon 8,000 of which £4 1/2 has been paid up, and the remaining 2,000 shares are retained for the vendors, as the remaining third of the original purchase-money, to be delivered to them when 20 per cent, is paid in any two consecutive years. The directors, therefore, propose to create £20,000 worth of debentures for five years, at 6 per cent, per annum, free of income-tax; and they hope that by adopting the plan of debentures repayable in a moderate number of years, the resources of the company will enable them to pay off the amount, and thus avoid a permanent addition to the capital of the company. This was adopted at the meeting.  The whole of the money is to be laid out in improving and extending the property, and a considerable portion of it will only be required in case certain contingencies — neither improbable nor remote— arise, which would make the property of immense value.  It is, indeed, the success of the undertaking which demands and justifies an additional outlay in the further development of the resources of the estate, while the security for the debentures is most ample, and ought to be a most desirable investment.

The following is the report of the meeting referred to. An extraordinary general meeting of the shareholders was held at the company's offices, Bishopsgate  street, on Tuesday, for the purpose of authorising the issue of £20,000 worth of debentures, in pursuance of the Articles of Association.  Col. John Bazalgette  in the chair. Mr. Murchison (the Secretary) read the notice convening the meeting; and the subjoined report, which had been previously circulated amongst the shareholders, was taken as read — " Your directors deem it right to explain to you briefly the present state and prospects of the company, as well as the objects for which they consider that further capital should at once be provided.  According to the advices from the manager, the saw mill was expected to be at work last month (March), and a contract had been entered into for the cutting of 1,000,000 feet of Kauri timber in the Wairahi Foiest, at the rate of at least 100,000 feet per month, which had been commenced, and was proceeding satisfactorily. This is in addition to what is being prepared in the Kairara district. One or two more dams have also been found necessary, so that, as before reported to you, the fact that the working of the mill has devolved on the company instead of on a lessee, as at first proposed, has rendered necessary a larger outlay of capital than was anticipated. Your director congratulate you on this part of the undertaking being at last probably in operation, from which a return may henceforth be expected, which will give a high rate of dividend on the whole capital of the company. The farms progress, and the sheep and cattle increase in number and value, but an immediate further outlay of capital ought to be made on these objects. Your manager writes that the farms will now bear a large addition of stock, and he regrets that the funds at his disposal will not allow him to go on clearing, and thus make more land available for farming and grazing. It is unnecessary to remind you of the early, large, and almost certain returns which may be looked for from a judicious outlay in this direction. The operations of the firewood cutters, mentioned in paragraph nine of the last report, render an increased expenditure desirable on clearing and sowing the land from which the wood has been taken. If this be done at once the cost will be but slight, but if delayed the clearing will, from the rapid growth of underwood, &c, be more expensive than if the ground had never been touched.  Mr. Heaphy, the provincial land surveyor, in his late report on Crown lands on the Great Barrier Island refers to 'the facilities of boating, and the abundance of fish off the coast,' and your manager has alluded to the same subject in several of his letters. Your directors are, therefore, pleased to find that he has commenced a fish curing establishment, on a small scale to begin with, until he sees how it will answer. The following is an extract from his last despatch: — 'The fish, curing experiment progresses. I am sending up to-day to Auckland about 7 cwts. of salted snappers and rock cod. They are beautifully cured, and if I can command a fair price for the article our operations are capable of extension to any amount — to the extent of my power to obtain labour. Some of the natives are anxious to be employed in catching fish, but I am waiting to see what price they will fetch. There is no doubt any quantity of fish can be procured.  In some of his earliest despatches your manager pointed out the difficulties to which he was exposed from the want of regular communication with Auckland. These he attempted to meet from time to time, but abstained from urging too strongly on the directors the only effectual remedy — the purchase of a vessel — as he felt that the funds of the company were required for objects of more immediate and pressing necessity. Your directors, however, believe that no further delay should take place in procuring a suitable vessel. Now that the saw-mill is at work it would be particularly useful, and it could be made profitable in many ways, while it would secure regularity of communication, with Auckland, and would remove the prejudice which has existed to some extent hitherto among the labourers of the province against taking employment at the Great Barrier, arising from the comparative difficulty and uncertainty of access and departure. As an investment it would almost certainly pay itself in a very few years. Your directors, having had the offer on favourable terms of a block of 666 acres of land, continuous to, or rather nearly surrounded by, your estate, have not hesitated to send out instructions to conclude the purchase; the desirability of this step will be obvious to any one who will glance at the map of your estate, which accompanies this report." The objects mentioned above have been partly, and will, your directors believe, be fully met by the moiety of the £20,000 of debentures which they now propose to create; but there are others highly important, which will most probably offer themselves forcibly to the attention of your directors, and the carrying out of which would rapidly raise your property into one of very great value. "The question of encouraging emigration to the Great Barrier has occupied the serious attention of your directors, and has been suggested to them by Mr. Allom (your manager), by the Governor of the colony, Sir George Grey, in conversation with him, and by the report of Mr. Heaphy, the provincial land surveyor, dated Feb. 11, 1862, already referred to. You will readily see that a settlement of emigrants on the island would be of the utmost consequence to your property. Mr. Heaphy remarks that, though the land is generally very hilly, the soil is good, and that in the various bays of the east coast, &c.; are many spots where 40 acre men, with their families, might cultivate successfully, and in other positions that much larger farms might be laid out. He says that 'the coast is well adapted to the requirements of ship and boat builders,' and that ' the facilities of boating and the abundance of fish off the coast, indicate the Great Barrier as the fitting site for a settlement of men from the western coast or islands of Scotland, or from the western coast of Ireland,' he suggests that the Great Barrier Company might become the means of introducing from Europe a body of emigrants of a fitting class, and thus form a special settlement. Your manager has been in communication with the Superintendent of the province on this subject, with the view of ascertaining on what terms the Provincial Government would make a grant to this company of part of the Crown lands on the Great Barrier island, in case they should introduce a certain number of suitable emigrants from Europe, who might be located either on new lands to be granted by the Government, or on the present property of the company, as may be thought most desirable. Your directors consider that if reasonable terms are offered by the Government they should be accepted, though the scheme would require a considerable expenditure. The more regular supply of labour, the increased demand for the produce of your farms, the greatly-enhanced value of your land, and the certainty of obtaining in grants of land, a full, or nearly full, compensation for the outlay in sending out and settling the emigrants, are self evident arguments in favour of a well-considered plan of this nature. "Your directors are gratified at having the views they have repeatedly expressed to you on the admirable position and unusual advantages of the company's harbour, Port Fitzroy, recently confirmed in an emphatic manner by experienced persons of considerable authority. In a work, lately published (entitled the " Gate of the Pacific"), by Commander Bedford Pim, R.N., he gives a plan of the harbour, and speaks of it as 'unexceptionable.' His remarks, that 'its situation at the mouth of the gulf, in the direct track of the capital, Auckland, is such as to make it a very desirable port of call for the mail steamers employed in the proposed route (via the Isthmus, of Central America)— indeed, the terminus of New Zealand, which lies within the shortest line of passage, is undoubtedly the Great Barrier Island, where there is every facility for coaling and obtaining supplies, if necessary, and the detention of the mail steamers might be made of the most trifling nature.' The following extracts of recent letters from your manaqer relates to this question.  Under date Oct 20, 1862, he writes:— 'l think it my duty to call the attention of the directors to the fact that the question of the route from England to New Zealand, via Panama, is again being very generally agitated throughout the colony. There can be no doubt, setting aside all predilections, that a line drawn upon the globe between Sydney and Panama, representing  the track of a vessel traveling that part of the ocean upon the great circle principle, would be shorter than any other that could be drawn between the two places. I am not sure whether this line would not actually cross the Great Barrier Island. The Mail Company would, of course, stipulate for the terminus in New Zealand, lying within the shortest line of route, and that is really and only the Great Barrier Island.' And again, on Dec. 22, 1862, he says: — 'In a conversation with the provincial surveyor, I find that he recommended the Great Barrier Island as the most suitable place for steamers to call. Some years ago, when the Royal Mail Company, or some other steam company, sent out an agent to make enquires on the subject, Mr. Heaphy tells me that he expressed to the agent his belief that the Barrier is preferable to any other port in New Zealand for the above purpose. I am decidedly of that opinion, and I trust the directors will leave no stone unturned to accomplish this object. The New Zealand Legislature have voted £30,000 a year towards carrying out the project, and if you can induce the Royal Mail Company to take the matter up, and choose the Barrier as their point of call, the future advantage to the Barrier Company will be very great. For a long time the supplies of coal for such a line would have to be drawn from New South Wales. Now, it is obvious that a collier would rather discharge at the Barrier than sail up the gulf to Auckland. This is an important item to be considered, and the cost of a coaling depot in Auckland would be very great.’ "You are, perhaps aware that the Postmaster- General of New Zealand, and an agent of the colony of New South Wales, are now in this country, with the view of inducing the British Government to join these colonies in a subsidy to a Panama line of steamers. New Zealand and New South Wales having already agreed to give £80,000 a year. Your directors need scarcely say that this matter occupies their unremitting attention, and they will spare no exertion to realise its accomplishment, which would be of immense results to the company, and compared with which the necessary outlay would be trifling. Before leaving the subject of the harbour, your directors would remark that the establishment of the saw mill is likely to be the means of attracting trade and population, and forming the nucleus of a township. Mr. Heaphy observes that 'the most valuable portion of the Great Barrier Island lies around Port Abercrombie (Fitzroy), and is owned by the Great Barrier Company.' "Several shareholder have lately represented to your directors that they had received information that gold existed on the Great Barrier Island, and your manager has also expressed his opinion to the same effect ; while the probability of such being the case is strengthened by the close proximity of the celebrated Coromandel gold-fields. A relative of one of our directors, who went out to the colony last year, writes under date December, 17, 1862, 'l am certain if a level were driven through the main chain that runs through the island, that a reef would be struck and gold found there. Murphy's chain, the richest in Coromandel, is in the same line of mountain, and only a little bit of sea divides the Great Barrier from it.’ Your directors may also mention that by an assay lately made of some ore or quartz from the copper mine gold has been found, and important information on this subject may be looked for by every mail. Your directors are not yet able to report t progress in the proposed sale of the copper mine, but they still hope that an arrangement may be made by which this company will receive a considerable sum in cash, and also a furthcr amount in paid up shares in any company that may be formed for that object. They feel sure that the mine can be made highly remunerative with a judicious outlay of capital. Your directors have devoted their chief attention hitherto to the erection of the saw-mill, as from that source they felt that a considerable return would be at once obtained.  As it is likely that the mill is now at woik, they deem it of much importance to develop with spirit the other objects above referred to. The present farms should be improved and others established, the stock of sheep and cattle should be considerably increased, the fish curing establishment ought to be largely extended, a suitable vessel should be purchased, while your directors should be in a position to carry out the project of a special settlement if favourable terms are offered, and also to lay out any necessary and reasonable amount in preparations for landing-wharves, and other requisite facilities for tendering Port Fitzroy a fitting port for steamers and other vessels, and as a depot for whalers. " By the circular of September, 30, 1862, you were informed that, under the power conferred on them by the 27th clause of the Articles of Association, your directors had determined on the issue of debentures to the extent of £5,000; but later advices from the colony, and the consideration above described, having rendered a larger outlay highly desirable, they have thought it better at once to ask your authority to raise £20,000, which will be secured by debenture  issued for a period of five years, bearing interest at the rate of 6 per cent per annum, free of income tax, and be a first charge on the company's property. Your directors propose, however, to issue only £10,000 (including the £5,000 mentioned above) and to call you together again before issuing any of the rest. By adopting the plan of debentures, repayable in a moderate number of years, your directors hope that the resources of the company will enable them to pay off the amount, and thus avoid a permanent addition to the capital of the company. " In conclusion, your directors beg sincerely to congratulate you on the condition and prospects of the company. Fresh openings for judicious enterprise are from month to month developing themselves, and you have a manager whose zeal, energy, and judicious conduct have won the confidence of your directors, and entitle him to yours. As a proof of the position which he holds in the colony, it may be added that the Governor has appointed Mr. Allom a justice of the peace for the province of Auckland.  It is the very success of the undertaking which demands and justifies an additional outlay in the further development of the resource of your estate. Your directors believe this to be the turning point in the history of the company, and they feel the fullest confidence that you will not only give them authority to raise the sum asked for, but that you will yourselves subscribe at once the full amount. It were superfluous to speak to you of the ample value of the security offered, while every pound raised will be devoted to the improvement of your own property, and will, in all human probability, produce large and immediate returns. " Dr. Dearle enquired from what source it was intended to pay the interest on the debenture, as unless that were stated they could scarcely expect that the shareholders would subscribe for them ? - Mr. Wright stated that the saw-mill was probably now at work, and that alone would yield enough to ensure the payment of the interest, and in addition a good dividend to the shareholders. The debenture holders would likewise be secured by a mortgage of the freeholds of the company, so that they would have ample security. Dr. Dearle suggested that it would be desirable to defer the consideration of the issue of the debentures until the annual general meeting, by which time they would have the accounts for the last year before them, and be in a better position to judge of their prospects. A Shareholder seconded the proposition, and as the time for holding the general meeting was so near at hand, he could not see that the postponement would make any material difference to the directors, or interfere with their financial arrangements. There was a loss on the previous year's working, and he thought that before they were asked to subscribe for debentures they should know the state of the accounts for 1862, and whether they showed a loss also. Mr. Wright said that, although it was obvious that the accounts which would be presented at the forthcoming meeting would show no available profit, there was really no loss, because the expenditure had all been bona fide outlay, and the value of the property was improved to the extent of, and more than the extent of, such outlay. They had intended to work their farms by tenants, who were to find the labour, the company finding the stocks, but in consequence of the failure of most of those tenants to carry out their arrangements the company had been compelled to take the farms into their own hands. The saw-mill was likewise to have been erected and worked by contractors, but the company had had to undertake it, and there had been an outlay upon it during the past year. That this change in their arrangements necessitated the expenditure of more money than they anticipated could not be questioned, but they would reap the full benefit of the outlay hereafter. At present all the expenditure must come out of capital, and there has been nothing returned yet, except a small quantity of wool, and a small return from the sawmill and sawn timber. The whole of the balance of capital last year was really expended ou revenue account. A Shareholder thought, if they had confined themselves to the saw mill, they would have been able to have had a dividend by this time. He feared the energv of Mr. Allom and the money of the company had been too much expended upon experiments. He thought that they should not attempt to isolate themselves by buying up all the land that happened to be offered, as by doing so they were really driving away those who were likely to bring labour into the island. At Auckland there was a good demand for timber such as they could supply, and if they could ensure a supply there were shipowners who would be glad to come for it. Mr.Wright conceived the objection to be that Mr. Allom's energies had not been directed to those pursuits which would immediately pay; but he could tell them that, from the day Mr. Allom went out, the directors had pressed upon him to confine his attention mainly to the saw-mill at first, as it was likely to be the easiest source of large profit, and no money had been expended upon other objects which would have been spent on the saw -mill. It would, however, have been impolitic to say that Mr. Allom should see to the erection of the saw-mill and to nothing else. The delays had arisen from circumstances beyond control, principally from the difficulty in obtaining skilled labour. The cutting of firewood had cost little, and it induces a communication with Auckland. They were really not going into purchases of land, but the piece of land, on Wairahi block was really necessary for the objects of the sawmill. They had had only the Kaiarara forest to work upon, but they would now have the Wairahi also, so that no contingencies would prevent their continued progress. The purchase of the 666 acres was to be effected for £333, or 10s an acre , and so convinced was Mr. Allom of the desirability of acquiring the property, that he had rented it for a year at £25, to give him time to communicate with the directors. As to then being wharfingers, he supposed the allusion was to the Panama route, as it was only in the event of the Panama route being adopted, and of Port Fitzroy being chosen as a port of call for the mail steamers, that it was thought it might be necessary to erect wharves, &c , and in such a case he believed the company would be but too glad to provide the necessary capital for giving accommodation, as they w ould be quickly repaid to an almost unlimited extent, foi it was impossible to say what their 25,600 freehold acres would then be worth. As to their fishing trade, it consisted in encouraging two men to come over from Auckland,  to cure fish, and the greatest loss to the company, even in case of failure, could only be £50, though, if successful, it would be extended.  After some unimportant conversation as to the principle upon which capital and revenue accounts were separated from each other— Mr. Wright explained that the increased value of the sheep would not come into the accounts to be presented at the next general meeting, although the full amount of the outlay would. The proposition to postpone the consideration of the debenture question was withdrawn, and it was unanimously resolved to give the directors the requisite authority. — A vote of thanks to the Chairman terminated the proceedings.

Daily Southern Cross, Volume XIX, Issue 1865, 9 July 1863, Page 3


War Scares at Great Barrier Island August 1863

 To the Honorable                                                                Great Barrier Island

The Colonial Secretary                                                        August 10 1863

Sir,

     On the 15th ultimo, I had the honour to address you respecting a supply of arms and ammunition from the Government for the protection of the inhabitants of this island.

            In reply, I have received a letter from the Colonial Defence Office dated the 23rd Ultimo, but the signature of the writer being illegible I am compelled to communicate with you direct.

            The letter from the Colonial Defence office is to this effect, - that I have not stated what is the danger which I apprehend, that if I am in no anticipation of an attack by the natives, arms cannot be furnished.

            I now beg to state that the danger we chiefly apprehend is from the attack of marauding parties of rebel natives from the Thames or the East Coast. To such attack the valuable property of the Great Barrier Company consisting of a steam Saw Mill, just commencing operations, with stores, sheep and cattle, together with the lives and properties of the employess and Tenants of the Company and other settlers, are completely exposed, and it does seem to me that from our isolated position and distance from Auckland, with every disposition to protect ourselves as far as possible we are deserving of some consideration from the Government.

            It is unnecessary for one to enter into reasons for thinking that such attacks are probable. It is sufficient, I think, for us to tell the Government that in the present state of the country they are quite possible. When we hear that the people of Coromandel and Waiheke are anticipating similar contingencies and deserting those places it is timely for us to be on the alert at the Barrier, where we are less able to obtain protection. Without some preparation in defence, the people here cannot be expected to remain in their employments, and thus all industrial pursuits would have to be suspended to the great loss to the Colony and all concerned.

            I think it prudent therefore to repeat my application to the Government for such protection as it may be able to afford, or that we may be provided immediately with arms and ammunition for our defence.

            I beg to propose that the Government should sanction the formation of a Volunteer Corps, under the usual Rules  & Regulations, for this Island. Such a Corps would consist of about 60 men all accustomed to the Bush and well immuned to every hardship, and I should be happy to command it. In case of serious danger an effort would be made to send the women and children to Auckland.

            I have no reason, at present, to suspect the Natives of this Island which are not more than 25 or 30 in number, of hostile intentions towards us. It is rather with their friends and connections from a distance that we may have to deal. But on the other hand, an experience of the Natives which extends over a period of upwards of 22 years warrants my belief that in the present state of affairs it would be imprudent to place much reliance on the friendly disposition of any of the Maori race.

            I most sincerely trust that we may be left to pursue our avocation here in peace, but should it unhappily occur that our position here should become untenable the Corps which I now propose to be formed might I hope be most usefully employed in active service, and though a married man with family, I should consider it my duty to accompany them.

            Requesting your early attention to this communhication,

            I have the honour to be, Sir,

            Your most obedient servant.

            Albert J. Allom J.P.

            General Manager & Agent for the Great Barrier Co.

 Source: Colonial  Defence File  AD 1, 1863/474


THE GREAT BARRIER LAND, HARBOUR, AND MINING COMPANY. (FROM THE "NEW ZEALAND EXAMINER," AUGUST 17)

The adjourned general meeting of proprietors was held at the office of the Company, No 8, Austinfriars, July 30, Colonel Bazalgette in the chair. Mr. J. H. Murchison (the Secretary) read the circular convening the meeting. The report stated that the adjournment of the ordinary general meeting from May 29 to July 31 was proposed in the hope that in the interval they would receive from Mr. AUum the lcmaiiiing accounts for 1862. They lme not, however, come to hand, but it is clear from his despatches that the business and interests of the company had been occupying every moment of his time, and that his great exertions to bring the saw mill into a working and profitablc state had unavoidably precluded him from attending to the completion of the accounts. The directors have been for a considerable time anxiously looking forward to the completion of the saw -mill, and they are now glad to report favourably as to this point. The erection of tho engine  was so far advanced that at the beginning of May it would be finished and probably be tried, and it was expected that by the middle of June the whole machinery would be ready to work. The contract for cutting one million feet of timber to be ready for the mill, and which it was believed would take ten months, had been completed in four months, showing the facilities to be greater than had been anticipated. Another contract had been made, which it was estimated would yield two million feet more, it being of the utmost importance that the supply to the mill should at no time be interupted. Mr. Allom has explored the position of a previously reported discovery of timber at Kiwirika, and he has no doubt that one million feet will be available there with very little difficulty. This is an unexpected addition to the quantity of Kauri forest possessed by the company. The supply from these forests is likely to last for some years. The price of Kauri timber in the colony is 16s to 17s per 100 feet, and it is likely to be fully maintained, owing to increased demand from permanent causes. Mr. Allom remarks that if they can get 10,000,000 feet to the mill, in five years or less, they would be able to realise £75,000 during that time, more than one half of which should be profit, an amount equal to more than the present paid up capital of the company. Under date the 6th of May he writes, "In all probability I may have to draw to the extent of another £1,000 before we get the mill to work; but should such be the case, I most sincerely trust and believe that before that sum would be payable in London the mill will be earning upwards of £300 a week, and the time is not far distant when the account will show a very different appearance. Your directors, therefore, were fully justified in the estimated results they held out to you from this source. Mr. Allom has brought forcibly before the directors the highly beneficial results to be obtained from clearing more land and stocking it with sheep. It is only a question of capital to obtain large returns for the company; and your directors regret that of the £10,000 debentures lately agreed to be  issued only £1,000 has been been subscribed for. They must impress on the shareholders the absolute necessity of supporting them by taking up the remainder of the amount. The requirements of the company demand that more money be supplied at once, and they trust that all the burden and responsibility would not be left upon them. Unless the shareholders come forward to the assistance of your directors by taking up the debentures, they will have no alternative but to call up the remaining capital, or to give special advantage to those who do advance the money. The Otea Company, for purchasing and working the copper mine, has not been established. They understand that a good many shares have been subscibed for — a considerahle portion of them conditionally on the requisite remainder, about 4,000, being made up. Your directors hope that you will apply for these, so as to complete the matter — a result which would be a great benefit to the company, which would get £5,OOO in cash (which might be devoted to the clearing of land and purchase of sheep), £10,00 in paid up shares, and a royalty on the ore. 

The Chairman having moved the adoption of the report, congratulated the shareholders upon the extremely encouraging character of the advices received from the manager in the colony. The directors placed the fullest credence in all these reports, and therefore they were justified in stating that the general prospects of the company were of the most satisfactory character. Mr. P. Wright said there could he no doubt as to the resources of the property, and that in the course of a short time they might confidently look forward to the declaration of a good dividend from the saw-mill alone. According to Mr. Allom's despatches, the returns from this source would probably within five years repay all the present paid up capital.  As regards the financial position of the company, the directors were much disappointed in not having been supported by the shareholders generally in taking up the debentures. Out of the £1,000 taken up, £1,500 had been subscribed for by the directors, and one or two other shareholders had taken up much more than their proportions. He trusted the shareholders would now come forward to take up the remaining £6,000 of the first issue. The report was received and adopted, and the retiring directors were re elected. The shareholders present subscribed for a portion of the debentures. Thanks to the Chairman concluded the proceedings.

Daily Southern Cross, 24 October 1863, Page 4 

1864 

Advertisement by Great Barrier Land, Harbour and Mining Company Limited

(Classified advertising)

 

Six per Cent. Per Annum for four years, amply secured on FREEHOLD PROPERTY - The Great Barrier Land, Harbour, and Mining Company (Limited).

Subscribed capital £50,000

                        Directors

Colonel John Bazalgette, 23 Dorset square, Regents Park.

Michael Hall, Esq., Director of the Imperial Bank (Limited).

Thomas Moxon Esq., 29 Throgmorton Street and Stck Exchange

Parke Pittar Esq., (Messrs. P.Pittar and Co.) 25 Gresham Street.,

Philip Wright Esq., Gopford, Colchester, late of  Auckland, New Zealand.

            Office 3 Austinfriars, London E.C.

Solicitors - Messrs Bischoff, Coxe and B------, 19 Coleman Street.

            Bankers - The Bank of London, Threadneedle Street.

This Company has lately created additional capital to the extent of £20,000, by debentures of £50 each, for four years from 1st May 1864 bearing interest at the rate of 6% per annum, free of income tax, payable half-yearly at the Bank of London. Coupons are attached to the bonds. These debentures are amply secured on the Company’s valuable freehold property, which consists of 26,050 acres of land bounded by the sea, and situate about 50 miles from Auckland, New Zealand. It includes Port Fitzroy said to be one of the finest harbours in the world. Five farms have already been established, three of which are let to good tenants. There are also forests of the well known Kauri Pine to realize which a powerful steam saw-mill has been erected and from which large profits will be made. The Company also holds 5,000 paid up shares in the Otea Copper Mining Company and are to receive a royalty on all ores sold by that Company. Only £10,000 of the debentures are to be issued at present, and re these upwards of one half is already taken. Applications for the of malader [?] may be made (in the form to be obtained at the office) to the Secretary, S. Austinfriars.

 

Source: The Times Wednesday, April 20th, 1864, page 3. Issue 24851 col.A.

 

 

A shareholder of the Otea Copper Mining Company complains bitterly

Money-Market & City Intelligence

            The following relates to the Stock-Exchange Committee and the Otea Mining Company.

                                                            “City, May 16.

“Sir- The remarks in your City Article of today relative to the conduct of the Stock-Exchange Committee in the case of the Otea Copper Mining Company are very just. Reasons for refusing the settlement have been stated by parties who could have got their information only from members of the Committee, and the directors have not only offered full explanations on any point, but have also informed the Committee that the only reasons they have heard assigned are absolutely false. Statements have also been made relative to the allotment by at least one member of the Committee which are not founded on fact and I have reason to believethat he has been informed of this and that his assertions are disproved by the documents of the company, which the directors have offered to show; and yet they persist in refusing to see the directors or to receive any explanations, or to reopen the matter in any way. Surely, if the Committee wish to act fairly, they would only be too glad to have a proper investigation, so that, if possible, they may justify their decision. It is high time that some step were taken to prevent any institution in the City of London from acting in a manner so dangerous to public morality. The Committee is composed of brokers and dealers in shares, and if they give no reasons for their decisions when their justice is called in question, they  must not be surprised if others give the reasons for them.

                                                “A Shareholder in the

                                                OTEA COMPANY.

Source: The Times  Tuesday, May 17th, 1864, page 9. Issue 24874.

 


“Great Barrier Island [New Zealand]

“The directors have despatches from the manager which advise the completion of an agreement for working the mill on terms similar to those indicated in his previous letters, and which were alluded  to in the director’s report in May. From this arrangement he anticipates considerable profits. The manager has also purchased on favourable terms a 40-ton schooner fully equipped, the possession of which by the company will greatly facilitate its operations and its communications with Auckland &c.

Source: The Times [of London]14th June 1864 p12 


“Great Barrier Island [New Zealand]

“The manager reports that the agreement relative to the saw mill, made with Dixon, is likely to work well, and that his arrangements seem to be very complete. A freshet had occurred and brought down a considerable number of logs, so that the working of the mill would soon be resumed. Kauri timber was selling at 20s per 100 ft. The manager also states that the schooner Osprey, lately purchased by the company, was proving a success, and affording great accommodation for carrying out the objects of the undertaking.

Source: The Times [London] 15th July, 1864 p10


 Advertisements in  ‘TheTimes’ for free emigration and free grants of land in the Auckland Province

Emigration to Auckland, New Zealand –

The Government of New Zealand are prepared to give FREE GRANTS of LAND in the Province of Auckland to SMALL FARMERS. Further particulars to be had on application to the Government Agency, between the hours of 11 and 4 daily, 3, Adelaide Place, London-bridge, London.

                                                Wm. S. Grahame

                                                John Morrison

                                                New Zealand Government Emigration Board.

 

Free Emigration to Auckland, New Zealand –

The Government of New Zealand are prepared to GRANT FREE PASSAGES to eligible AGRICULTURAL and GENERAL LABOURERS, Mechanics, Miners, &. Applications for schedules and other information to be made at the office of the Government Agency, between the hours of 11 and 4 daily, 3, Adelaide Place, London-bridge, London.

                                                Wm. S. Grahame

                                                John Morrison

                                                New Zealand Government Emigration Board.

 Both advertisements are from –

The Times  23rd August, 1864 page 6

1865

Governor Grey at Nagle Cove  8th May, 1865

ARRIVAL OF THE GOVERNOR FROM THE KAWAU.  

ARRIVAL OF THE GOVERNOR FROM THE KAWAU.

H.M.S. 'BRISK,' Captain Hope, with His Excellency the Governor on board, arrived from the Kawau on Saturday afternoon. As we stated on Tuesday, the ' Brisk ' took his Excellency to the Kawau on Monday last. She lay off that island on Monday night, and sailed next morning to the Hot Springs, where she anchored. On Wednesday morning she proceeded to Nagle’s Cove at the Great Barrier, and on Thursday steamed to Kaiarara. The officers of of the 'Brisk' went ashore' on the island, and were hospitably received by Mr. Allom, of the Great Barrier Company. The vessel was taken through what is known as the Governor's Passage, one of the entrances to Port Fitzroy, and which is laid down in the " New Zealand Pilot" as being' fit only for boats. The passage of ' the 'Brisk' shows that this channel is capable of being taken by screw steamers, and as it saves eight or ten miles the achievement is of some importance.  Particular observation was also taken of the Horn Rock, a dangerous spot in the channel between the Great and Little Barriers, and we understand that his Excellency has promised to have a careful survey made of it, so that the exact depth of water upon the rock, at the different tides may be made known. The 'Brisk' left the Barrier on Friday morning at 6.30, arriving at the Kawau in the forenoon; and the Governor having embarked early on Saturdayshe arrived in

Auckland as above.  

Daily Southern Cross, Volume XXI, Issue 2433, 8 May 1865, Page 4


WANTED, by the GREAT BARRIER LAND HARBOUR and MINING Co (Limited), a competent PERSON to take, the practical MANAGEMENT of their SAW MILL, at Port Fitzroy.- None but persons thoroughly and practically acquainted with the working of Saw Mills in this country need apply. — Personal applications may be made to Mr. Allom, at the Company's Office, Canada Buildings, Queen street, on Monday and Tuesday next, the 3rd and 4th July, between 11 am. and 1 p.m.

Source: Daily Southern Cross 1st July 1865 p1 

 

GREAT BARRIER ISLAND. (FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT.)

Nearly everybody in Auckland has heard of the Great Barrier Island, and many who have arrived by sea have seen a range of hills which have been pointed to them as that island, but few have, with the exception of old settlers, any idea of  the place beyond the fact that it can be seen from Mount Eden, and that it forms one of the leading marks of entrance to the Hauraki Gulf.  Some little interest may therefore be felt in a short detail of what is going on there, and of what its resources consist. From its northern extremity — the Needles which are about 70 miles from Auckland— towards the south the land is very broken, and the western face is high and precipitous.  In this  part of the island there are no inhabitants, but the hills which are high and numerous,  abound with pigs and goats. The first appearance of habitation is at a lofty point about four miles from the Needles, known as the Mine.  Close alongside is a little bay in which those engaged in working the mine reside. The mine is of copper, and the ore is said to be rich. It was worked some years ago, with great success, but since that time it has, in common with all the land north of the southern extremity of Port Fitzroy with the exception of the native reserve, passed into the hands of the Great Barrier Land, Harbour, and Mining Company,  and has been worked but little, and that unsuccessfully.  Lately it has been sold to the Otea Mining Company,  who are making active preparations  to work it, and it is to be hoped it will be with success, as the captain sent out recently from England gives it a good name and is confident it will soon return  a handsome dividend  to the company.  The bay alongside the mine, and occupied by the miners, is a small one. Flat and very pretty scenery surrounds it, though it is subject to very violent winds. There is a store, and every convenience for  workmen, engineers, &c., engaged at the mine.  The next bay proceeding south is marked on the map as Catherine's  Bay, though it is only known down there as Maori Bay, being the native reserve.  It is, as its name implies, inhabited by natives closely connected with the Bay of Islands tribe.  The chief’s name is Atera, and the' whole tribe does not probably exceed 50 in number. They keep their cultivations in fine order, and possess a large number of cattle and horses.  They are universally polite and kindness and goodwill mark all their actions towards European settlers, with whom they are in close communication.  They have recently leased a portion of their reserve to a European named Cook, who is making a large clearing with a view to making, at no distant period, a good sheep run. The next place of any importance is Nagle Cove, at the entrance to Port Abercrombie and which,  with Port Fitzroy, Selwyn Island, and all the surrounding land, belongs to the Great Barrier Company. Nagle Cove is a nice little, anchorage,  and the fine , grassy sheep run by which it is surrounded is leased by Mr. Moore  from the Company.  Since Mr. Moore's arrival, nearly six years.ago,  he has made a fine clearing, and nearly 1000 sheep,  with cattle of all kinds, are to be seen grazing  on his farm.  Port Fitzroy, the inner  harbour of Port Abercrombie and formed by Selwyn Island is a magnificent harbour and for beauty  of scenery surpasses  anything I have ever  seen.  Mr. Allom, the company's manager,  resides in a bay in this harbour called Kaiarara, and the saw-mill (belonging to the company,  is on a flat opposite to the manager’ s house.  This is undoubtedly for size and power the largest sawmill in New Zealand.  Until lately it has been working, and no doubt with great profit to all concerned. It has, however, recently been stopped although an enormous quantity of timber is lying ready to be sawn in the Wairaki creek at the southern end of the harbour. I took a walk through the forests that surround the southern part of the company’s property lately, and was amazed at the large quantity of timber growing in them, and at the no less magnificent dams and othe appliances made in getting the timber to the mill. The Great Barrier Company owns also several farms round Port Fitzroy, and the sheep and cattle on them seem to be in a flourishing condition.  South of Port Fitzroy is an island, called Flat Island, belonging  to the natives,  and which is cultivated by them. Next comes another fine landlocked harbour,  known as Whangaparapara harbour, and the land around which belong , I believe,  to Messrs  Heale and Whitaker, who have an agent,  Mr. Harding, residing there.  There are some fine and very curious hot springs at the harbour. The land is good, though very hilly all around, and the cultivations have not proceeded to the same extent as on the company’s  property. Okupu Bay is the next place of note. The northern side belongs to Mr. Du Moulin, and is fine land, though rocky and the soil thin on many parts. It is but little reclaimed at present. The land on the opposite side of the bay is also fine, and belongs  to the Government.  It is unsettled at present, though  it abounds in wild cattle. The land and general  appearanc e  of Okupu Bay and Tryphena, the next and  last port on the Barrier, present a very favourable contrast to the northern portions of the island.  Tryphena is in part settled,  and Mr. Malcolm has  a fine farm there. It will doubtless  one day become an important port of New Zealand, as it affords good shelter to vessels bound in or out past Cape Colville. The eastern part of the Barrier Island, though more exposed, contains the best land,  and will, no doubt, when better known, be settled.  Altogether the Barrier Island, wild and bleak as it appears from the sea, has many redeeming features, among which may be mentioned the fine weather which almost always is to be experienced there, even when it is raining in Auckland and its vicinity; and it is to be hoped that the enterprise  of the Great Barrier Company and its other settlers will soon make its exports of copper, timber, granite, freestone, wool, gum, sheep, and cattle, an important item in Auckland prosperity and commerce.  As a summer trip to the tourist or sportsman, a visit to the Barrier Islands could not fail to be enchanting. To the latter the numberless pigs and wild cattle that infest its woods, and the magnificent whapuka and other fish in which its waters abound,  would be a fair field of enjoyment ;  and to the former its hot springs at Wangaparapara (of which at some future date I will give you a full description), its romantic lake-like harbours, and fine though wild mountain scenery,  will render it well  worth  the name of the Switzerland of the South. 

 Source: Daily Southern Cross 7th September, 1865 p4

 

Mrs Allom gives birth to a son on Great Barrier Island

Births

On the 16th of October, 1864, at Port Fitzroy, Great Barrier Island, New Zealand, the wife of Albert J. Allom, Es., of a son.

Source: The Times, Friday, January 13th, 1865, page 1. Issue 25081


1866 

At the meeting of the Great Barrier Land, Harbour and Mining Company (Limited), on the 9th instant, the directors' report stated the liabilities of the concern at £5,000, and the assets at £3,683, leaving £1,817 to be provided for at this date. The board, therefore, advise that, in order to meet existing necessities, to place the company in funds, to improve and extend the farms already established, and to take advantage of any material rise in the price of timber or any other favourable contingency, the balance of the first £10,000 debentures, amounting to £4,200. should be subscribed for at once.

Source: Daily Southern Cross 24th September, 1866 p4

1867


The Debenture is signed by Phillip Wright and John Bazalgette.












1868

Notice of Petition for Winding-up of the Great Barrier Land Harbour and Mining Company

In the Matter of the Companies Act 1862, and 1867, and in the Matter of the Great Barrier Land Harbour and Mining Company (Limited) - Notice is hereby given, that a PETITION for the WINDING-UP of the above-named Company by the Court of Chancery was, on the 17th day of June 1868 presented to the Lord Chancellor by Richard Thomas Smith Andrew, of Tunbridge-wells, in the county of Kent, gentleman, a creditor of the said Company, and that the said petition is directed to be heard before the Vice-Chancellor Giffard on Saturday, the 25th day of July, 1868; and any creditor or contributory of the said Company desirous to oppose the making of an order for the winding-up of the said Company, under the above Acts should appear at the time of the hearing, by himself or his councel, for that purpose, and a copy of the petition will be furnished to any creditor or contributory of the said Company reuiring the same by the undersigned, on payment of the regulated charges for the same.

                        W.F.Barnes, Lincolns-inn-Chambers, 40, Chancery-Inns, in the county of Middlesex, agent for Richard Thomas Smith Andrew, of Tunbridge-wells, in the county of Kent, the Petitioner.

Source: The Times,  Tuesday July 14th, 1868, page 4. Issue 26176.



1878

THE GREAT BARRIER LAND, HARBOUR AND MINING COMPANY (LIMITED), IN LIQUIDATION. — Instructions having been received in the Colony to dispose of the property of the above Company, the undersigned is prepared to enter into arrangements at once for the SALE of the WHOLE PROPERTY; or, in case the Estate be not sold in one lot, then to offer the same in lots to suit intending purchasers. The Property is situated on the northern portion of the Great Barrier Island, sixty miles from the town of Auckland, and contains about 26,000 Acres, besides several outlying Islands In Port Fitzroy. On the northern end of the Island is situated the Otea Copper Mine, which formerly turned out large quantities of ore of a very rich character, but which ceased working about ten years ago in consequence of the embarrassments of the above Company. The whole of this portion of the Property presents indications of mineral wealth, and is heavily timbered with puriri, pohutukawa, rata, tea-tree, and other woods, and there is near the Mine what was once a small village, formerly occupied by the workmen of the Company. On the east coast of the island, and adjoining the above block, is a fine alluvial flat of about 4000 acres of the richest description, and intersected by navigable creeks. The northern portion of this flat contains valuable timber, and the whole is arable. Fronting Port Fitzroy, which is without exception one of the finest harbours in the Colony, are several improved farms, formerly occupied by tenants of the Company, and all round the harbour, for a frontage of twenty miles, there are beautiful bays sheltered from every wind, and which would make admirable homesteads, well suited for the cultivation of the olive and vine from their sheltered position and fine climate. In many parts of this harbour and Port Abercrombie (also the Company's property) valuable bushes abound of puriri (suitable for railway purposes), tea-tree, and pohutukawa (for shipbuilding), and all other woods, all handily situated, where vessels can load in any weather, while along the ranges at the back valuable kauri forests exist, having an outlet by creeks to Port Fitzroy, where there is a saw-mill and workmen's and manager's houses. As a whole this Estate presents to speculators and capitalists a perfectly unique property, and one not likely to be again in the market, while to persons of small means it offers a splendid chance of acquiring a homestead, with every desideratum, for a small sum. To such persons, wholly apart from the Company, I am in a position to obtain for them any advance or accommodation they may require in reason to assist them. Full particulars, reports on the Mine, plans, &c, can be seen at my offlce.  ARTHUR PITTAR, Winstone Buildings, Custom-house street, Auckland.

A Saw-mill, capable of cutting 90,000 feet weekly, for sale. Several large Islands in the Hauraki Gulf for Sale. Numerous fine properties for sale in all parts of the Provincial District of Auckland. —Apply to Arthur Pittar, Custom-house street, Auckland. 

Source: Otago Daily Times 25th December 1878 p4 

THE GREAT BARRIER LAND, HARBOUR AND MINING COMPANY (LIMITED), IN LIQUIDATION. Instructions having been received in the Colony to dispose of property of the above Company, the undersigned is prepared to enter into arrangements at once for the SALE of the WHOLE  PROPERTY; or, in case the Estate be not sold in one lot, then to offer the same in lots to suit intending purchasers. The Property is situated on the northern portion of the Great Barrier Island, sixty miles from the town of Auckland, and contains about 26,000 Acres, beside several outlying Islands in Port Fitzroy. On the northern end of the Island is situated the Otea Copper Mine, which formerly turned out large quantities of ore of a very rich character, but which ceased working about ten years a ago consequence of the embarrassments of the above Company. The whole of this portion of the Property presents indications of mineral wealth, and is heavily timbered with puriri, pohutukawa, rata, tea- tree, and other woods, and there is near the Mine what was once a small village, formerly occupied by the workmen of the Company. On the east coast of the island, and adjoining the above block, is a fine alluvial flat of about 4000 acres of the richest description, and intersected by navigable creeks. The northern portion of this flat contains valuable timber, and the whole's arable. Fronting Port Fitzroy, which is without exception one of the finest harbours: in the colony, are several Improved Farms, formerly occupied by tenants of the Company , and all round the harbour, for a frontage of twenty miles, there are beautiful bays sheltered from every wind , and which would make admirable homesteads, well suited to the cultivation of the olive and vine, from their sheltered position and fine climate. In many parts of this harbour and Port Abercrombie (also the Company's property) valuable bushes abound of Puriri (suitable for railway purposes) tea-tree, and pohutukawa (for ship- building) and all other woods, all handily situated, where vessels can load in any weather, while along the ranges at the back valuable kauri forests exist, having au outlet by creeks to Port Fitzroy, where there is a saw-mill and workmen's and manager's houses. As a whole this Estate presents to speculators and capitalists a perfectly unique property, and one not likely to be again in the market, while to persons of small means it offers a splendid chance of acquiring a homestead, with every desideratum, for a small sum. To such persons wholly apart from the Company, I am in a position to obtain for them any advance or accommodation they may require in reason to assist them. Full particulars, reports on the Mine, and plans, &c, can be seen at my office. —  ARTHUR PITTAR, Winstone Buildings, Customhouse-street, Auckland.

A Saw-mill, capable of cutting 90,000 feet weekly, for sale. Several large Islands in the Hauraki Griilf for sale.  Numerous fine properties for sale in all parts of the Provincial District of Auck- land.— Apply to Arthur Pittar, Custom- house-street, Auckland, or to E. H. Beere, Lambton Quay, Wellington.

Source: Wanganui Chronicle 2nd December 1878 p3



1884

The Great Barrier Company.

The holders of, shares and debentures in the Great Barrier Land, Harbour and Mining Company will be gratified to learn that there is at least a prospect of a handsome return under the liquidation. It appears that when the Company went into liquidation in 1868, the assets consisted of 30,000 acres of valuable land, upon which were several prosperous farms, in a favourable position, on Great Barrier Island, at the mouth of the Gulf of Auckland, NZ. The liquidators appointed in 1868 were Messrs P. Wright, Frewer, and Park Pittar, but after the liquidation had being going on for some two or three years an order was made that the winding up should be continued under the supervision of the Court, and Mr Good (of Messrs Good, Daniels and Co., Poultry), was appointed official liquidator. Since the appointment no public meeting is known to have been held, although it is stated that a considerable proportion of the assets has been realised, and that the remainder has vastly increased in value; these, however, are matters of which nothing can be definitely stated until the liquidator's accounts are publicly submitted. It is understood, however, that there will be no further delay, Mr Good having given a shareholder a distinct assurance that he will call a meeting to render a complete account of his stewardship. From the reputation of the firm, it is not doubted that whatever sales of property made have been at good prices, and that whatever remains in hand will be well sold ; so that shareholders and debenture holders may, if they carefully watch their interests look for a speedy return for a large proportion of their investments. The calling of the meeting will be anxiously waited for.—European Mail. .

Source: Thames Star 4th January, 1884 p3


1894

Lands and Survey Office, Auckland, November 6, 1894. A CROWN GRANT, No. 22144. in the favour of the Great Barrier Land Harbour and Mining Company (Limited), for 46 acres at Great Barrier Island, is now ready for delivery at the Office of the Registrar of Deeds, Auckland, under the Crown Grants Act, 1883. A fee of threepence per month is chargeable on the said grant for every month it shall remain in the Deeds Register Office, after the expiration of three months from this date. GERHARD MUELLER, Commissioner of Crown Lands.  

Source: Observer 24th November, 1894 p10


1900

 Local and General,

 Mr A. Pittar left Auckland yesterday for London on business in connection with the Great Barrier Land Harbour and Mining Company.

Source: Thames Star  10th July, 1900 p4

1909 

 AN EARLY COLONIST.

ALBERT JAMES ALLOM. COMPANION OF EDWARD GIBBON WAKEFIELD). News comes from Auckland of the death, at the age of eighty-three, of Mr. Albert James Allom, one of the earliest New Zealand colonists. He had a most interesting career, particulars of which have been fortunately left in his own handwriting. The editors of "Who's Who in New Zealand" have furnished the New Zealand Times with the following details of Mr. Allom's life which he sent to them, by request, a few months before his death. Mr. Allom was born at Holloway, London, on December 20, 1825, and educated at a private school near Hampstead. When a youth of fourteen or fifteen years of age he was a frequent companion of Mr. Edward Gibbon Wakefield, the founder of New Zealand. He was appointed a cadet of the New Zealand Company's Surveying Staff, and sailed from Gravesend in the barque Brougham, with the other members of the staff, on October 2, 1841, arriving at Wellington on February 9th, 1842. The three years engagement of the Surveying Staff expiring on February 8, 1843, Mr. Allom, with a brother cadet, Mr. John Tully, settled in the Wairarapa upon the Taonui sheep and cattle station. He sailed from Wellington in the barque Woodstock, on March 4, 1848, and arrived in London on July 9, 1848.

RESIDENCE WITH WAKEFIELD. Until the end of the year 1848, Mr. Allom resided with Mr. E. G. Wakefield at Boulognc-sur-mer, acting as his amanuensis in preparing his book entitled "A View of the Art of Colonisation," for the press. He left Boulogne, with the MSS. copy for the press, at midnight, by steamer on Christmas Eve, and delivered it on Christmas morning, 1848, at Wellington Street, Strand, London, to Mr. Robert Rintoul. Mr. Wakefield's friend, the proprietor and editor of the Spectator, to be sent to the printer. Mr. Allom resided with Mr. Wakefield during various portions of the years 1849 and 1850. as his private secretary, at Reigate, Surrey, being principally engaged in promoting the objects of the Canterbury Association. He assisted Mr. Frederick (afterwards Sir Frederick) Young, and Mr. William Bowler in the shipping department of the association. He was present on July 30, 1850, at the farewell banquet to the Canterbury colonists given at Blackwall to the passengers by the Charlotte Jane, Randolph, Cressy, and Sir George Seymour.

IN THE WEST INDIES. Mr. Allom sailed from Southampton for Tobago, West Indies, as private secretary to the Lieut. Governor of that island, Mr. Dominic (afterwards Sir Dominic) Daly, in the Royal Mail s.s. Medway on December 17, 1851. He was appointed Deputy Colonial Secretary at Tobago during the absence on leave of Mr. Thornton, the Colonial Secretary, on May 3, 1852. He received his commission as aide-de-camp with brevet rank of Lieut. Colonel, signed by President Yeates, the officer administering the Government of Tobago, on January 27, 1854, and his commission under the public seal of Tobago as Colonial Secretary provisionally, on the resignation of Mr John Thornton, signed by Lieut.- Governor Shortland (the first Colonial Secretary of New Zealand), on February 27, 1854.

FALL OF SEBASTOPOL.  Mr. Allom then obtained nine months leave of absence on account of ill health and left Tobago on September 24, 1855. At St. Thomas he heard the news of the fall of Sebastopol. He arrived in London on October 16, 1855. His appointment by her Majesty Queen Victoria to the office of Colonial Secretary at Tobago, was notified in the London Gazette, on January 18, 1856. Mr. Allom married Miss Eliza Horn, third daughter of George W. Horn, of 28, Great George Street, Westminster, and Winchfield, Hants, the officiating clergyman at that ceremony being the Rector of Eversley, the Rev. Charles Kingsley, on July 24, 1856. He sailed for Tobago by R.M.S.S. La Plata on October 2, 1856. On arrival at Tobago, by virtue of the Queen's Warrant addressed to Sir Francis Hincks, Governor-General at Barbadoes, he was appointed Colonial-Secretary, Registrar Clerk of the Council, and Clerk of the Enrolments. During the next few years he suffered severely from fever and ague; and by medical advice was granted nine months leave of absence. He left the island with his wife and family on May 24, 1859. Warned by medical advisers not to return to the West Indies, and no suitable vacancy occurring in the gift of the Colonial Minister, he resigned the office of Colonial Secretary at Tobago, on June 23, 1860. SAILED FOR AUCKLAND. He then accepted the appointment of general manager and agent for the Great Barrier Land. Harbour and Mining Company, Ltd., of London, and sailed for Auckland in the ship Mermaid with his wife and family on September 5, 1861, arriving at Auckland on December 16, 1861. He held this appointment in conjunction with that of general manager and agent for the Otea Copper Mining Company, Ltd. (subsequently formed) until 1867, when partly owing to a grave financial crisis, these companies failed for want of sufficient capital. The Thames, gold field having been discovered and proclaimed in 1867, he erected and managed at Grahamstown, Thames, until the end of the year 1868, a large wholesale warehouse and store for Messrs Owen and Graham, of Auckland. He made a voyage to Batavia (Java) as supercargo of the barque Rapid to purchase for an Auckland syndicate a cargo of special white crystal sugar — value £12,000. He sailed from Auckland, April 6, 1869, and returned on September 28, 1869.

ON THE GOLDFIELDS. At the request of the newly-elected Superintendent of Auckland, Hon. T. B. Gillies, Mr Allom accepted the office of Mining Registrar at Thames, with a view to re-organise that department, on January 17, 1870. On the opening of the Ohinemuri goldfield, he took charge at Mackaytown as Receiver of Gold Revenue and Mining Registrar, March 3, 1875. He was taken over by the General Government into the Civil Service on the abolition of the provinces, on January 1, 1876. Mr Allom was ordered to return to Thames to take up the offices of Receiver of Gold Revenue and Mining Registrar, August 30, 1877. During the following nine years, at Thames, he held offices of Receiver of Gold Revenue, Mining Registrar, Receiver of Land Tax, Clerk of District, Resident Magistrate's and Warden's Courts, Clerk of Licensing Courts, Registrar of Electors and Returning  Officer for Coromandel. Frequently shifted from one department to another, to suit the so-called exigencies of the service, he arrived in 1886, at the age limit, without any higher pay; than when entering the Provincial Government Service seventeen years previously, he left the service without regret on October 30. 1886.

SUBSEQUENT CAREER . He made a trip in the Janet Nicol visiting Tonga, Samoa, Raratonga, and Tahiti, during November-December 1886. At the general election, 1887, he held the post of returning officer for the Electoral District of Coromandel. In August, 1889, Mr. Allom left Auckland for Launceston, Tasmania, and remained there with his wife and family until October 1896, returning to Auckland in January, 1897. He took active part in the erection of the statute of Queen Victoria in Albert Park, Auckland, until the statute was finally unveiled by Lord Ranfurly on May 24, 1899.

HIS PARENTS. Mr A Horn's father, Thomas Allom, was well known in the first and second quarters of last century, as a London architect and water-colour artist, whose illustrated works, published by Messrs Fisher, Son and Co. and Messrs Virtue and Co., were much esteemed in England, on the Continent, and in other parts of the world. Thomas Allom was one of the founders of the Royal Institute of British Architects. He has been recognised as one of the best architectural draughtsmen of his day. His lithographic views, for the New Zealand Company, drawn from  sketches supplied by the preliminary expedition under Col. Wakefield in 1839-40, contributed largely to make New Zealand popular in its early days. His mother was universally known as a valuable, energetic, and enthusiastic ally of the company. Mrs. Thomas Allom was awarded the Silver Isis Medal of the Royal Society of Arts for her introduction of bees to Nelson in the ship Clifford, early in May, 1842. Her ancestors were Huguenots, who on the revocation of the Edict of Nantes, had been driven from France, and settled in Ireland.

Source: Taranaki Herald 23rd February 1909 p9