Etiquette

Digital Etiquette (Netiquette): the standards of conduct expected by other digital technology users

Essential Questions

Are students aware of other humans when using technology?
When using technology, are students aware of their affect on others?

Digital Etiquette Issues

  • Using technology without a negative affect on other humans
  • Being aware of appropriate content and context with the use of technology
  • Understanding how to be respectful to others online

Resources

RFC 1855 Netiquette Guidelines

InfoWorld - The 10 Commandments of Cell Phone Etiquette

NSF - Ethics and Computing

Phoneybusiness.com - Mobile Etiquette
Eight points to remember

Cell Phone Etiquette
The disruption of cell phone use, including text messaging, is causing such a problem that some business executives ban the use of cell phones during meetings. Cell phones are not the issue, the users are.


Examples of Inappropriate Digital Etiquette
  • Speaking or texting on the cell phone while driving
  • Carrying on loud cell phone conversations in crowded areas or at public performances
  • Texting while carrying on conversations
  • Using technology for bullying or like behaviors
  • Unwillingness to share public technology
  • Using camera phones inappropriately
  • Using communication devises for non-class related issues during class time

Examples of Appropriate Digital Etiquette

  • Turning cell phone ringers to vibrate or silent when in public areas
  • Keeping cell phone conversations private by moving 10-20 feet away from others and speaking with a soft voice
  • Offering to share technology with others
  • Inform adults of misuse of technology (bullying)
  • Stopping vehicle in safe area to use cell phones
  • Check for messages on communication devises during personal time

Digital Etiquette Scenarios
Scenario #1
One weekend a group of friends decide to do some shopping.  Sarah has decided to drive and after picking up a couple of friends she merges on to the interstate and heads towards the mall.  Traffic is heavy as usual and within a few minutes Sarah's cell phone begins to ring. Sarah reaches for her phone... 
    • Inappropriate Response Example
      Kate, one of Sarah's friends, grabs the phone and mumbles something about Kate's driving while allowing voice mail to pick up. 

    • Appropriate Response
      Kate offers to answer the phone and encourages Sarah to pull over at the next exit and take the call if she wishes.
Scenario #2 - Amy Antle
Following the soccer game, the team was in the locker room gathering their belongings. Julie decided to take a quick shower since she was heading to a friend's house to study for an exam she had the following day. Annie, the team captain, thought it would be funny to use her camera phone to take a photo of Julie in the shower. She quietly entered the shower area, and took a quick photo of Julie. Annie runs back to the team bellowing with laughter.
  • Inappropriate Response Example
    Annie, along with other girls on the team, rush home to post the photo on their social networking site. 
  • Appropriate Response  Example
    A teammate intervenes and deletes the photo from Annie's camera phone as she explains how inappropriate it is to photograph someone without their permission. Annie agrees and apologizes to Julie for taking her photo while she was in the shower. 

How can teachers make a difference?

  • Teachers can educate students about the dangers of being distracted while driving.  Teachers could allow students to research data on cell phone use and accidents (specifically high school students).  Teachers could bring in data and have the students analyze, interpret and draw conclusions.  
  • Teachers should educate students on how to appropriately use communication devices such as cell phones, e-mails, and text messaging by showing examples that illustrate both appropriate and inappropriate uses.