apPARENTly: CHS Counseling News You Can Use

March 13, 2012      http://a2community.org


CHS Dates and Events

Counseling News


Eye on the PI  (Pioneer High)

Rat Rap (Huron High)

Ann Arbor Public School Happenings   

Area Happenings


826Michigan


Neutral Zone


Join Together

Contact Us


 

CHS Dates and Events

3/14 PI Day

3/19 Conference Call-Ins 6-8 PM

3/21 Early Release Day

3/22-25  Avenue Q

3/26Parent/Teacher Conferences 3:30-6:30

3/27 SIT

3/27 NACAC College Fair Burton Manor Livonia 6:30-8:30 PM

3/28 College and Career Fair @ PHS 6-8PM

4/2-6 Spring Break

4/9 School Resumes

4/12 Food Gatherers Drive Begins

4/12 Shorts on the Ledge

4/12 NHS Induction 7:00 PM

4/17 SIT 3:00PM

4/20 3rd Quarter Ends

4/23-27 Green Week

4/23 9th Grade Vision Screening

4/25 Early Release NSAU

4/26 Senior Meeting 2:00 St. Andrews Church

4/26 Arts, Science and Letters Night

 

 

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      CHS News:

 

1. The Community Ensemble Theatre presents, "Avenue Q", directed by Quinn Strassel. Avenue Q, (the school edition) is a hilarious, feel-good musical performed by a wonderful mix of puppets and humans. Cross Sesame Street with the Muppet Show, give it a PG13 rating and be prepared for side-splitting hilarity. Winner of three Tony awards, Avenue Q is one of the longest running shows in Broadway's history.

Performance Dates:

Thursday, March 22nd 7:30pm

Friday, March 23rd 7:30pm

Saturday, March 24th 7:30pm

Sunday, March 25th 2pm

 General public tickets may be purchased at showtix4u.com, by choosing the BUY TICKETS tab and searching for this event under e.g.  Ann Arbor.

 

2. Order your Year Book now and Save $ Currently  $55.  Here is the link to buy a Community High Midnight Sun 2012 Volume 39 yearbook: http://jostensyearbooks.com/?REF=A03601630

       

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Check out the latest stories on Community High's nationally-award-winning newspaper The Communicator Web (http://the-communicator.org). Also look for work from Community High Journalists on The Huffington Post High School Edition (http://www.huffingtonpost.com/high-school/).

Opposition's Voice: The Wisconsin Recall

http://the-communicator.org/2012/02/an-oppositions-voice-the-wisconsin-recall/

 

Community High Poetry Slam Sends Six to Next Round

http://the-communicator.org/2012/03/first-of-poetry-slam-semi-finals-sends-six-to-next-round/

 

A Brief History of CHS Murals

http://the-communicator.org/2012/02/the-murals-of-chs-a-brief-history/

 

CHAT Raises Money for Strong Kid's Campaign

http://the-communicator.org/2012/02/chat-raises-funds-for-the-strong-kids-campaign/

 

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CHS Counseling News

All Students

1. Ann Arbor District Library sponsors its annual Short Story Writing Contest. Entries accepted now through March 16.  www.aadl.org or call 734-327.4291 or see your favorite CHS English teacher.

2. Visiting colleges or want to? Amtrak features 50% coupons for student and parents/guardians. To get your coupon, go to: http://www.campusvisit.com/amtrak.htm

3. Greyhound offers 15% discount for students with their “Student Advantage Card.” Also gives up to 50% discount on stuff. http://www.studentadvantage.com/nextstep

 

~~~~~~

Seniors

*1. WCC Bound? The Morse Barker Scholarship honors students with 2.0+ GPA, financial need, non smoker. Deadline: April 2, 2012. Apply at: http://scholarships.egrant.net

 

*2. Google has invited 50 Ann Arbor Public School 12th graders to visit

their Ann Arbor offices on Tuesday, April 17 from 3:30p.m. to 5:30

p.m.  Interested students must complete an application (see John B) and

drop it off in the Counseling office by the end of the school day on

Friday, March 23.  Two weeks from now. Students will be selected from all Ann Arbor Public School high schools.  Slots have been reserved for each school based on the percentage of 12th graders each school serves in comparison to the number of 12th graders in the entire district.

 

 

Freshmen, Sophomores and Juniors

 

Take Note…

Wednesday, March 28, 2012

Ann Arbor Public Schools 27th Annual

College & Career Fair

Pioneer High School

6:00 - 8:00 P.M

 

2. Interested in Automation Technology? WCC’s high demand job series presented AT with panel and demonstrations: March 26, 11:00AM-1:30 PM at WCC’s Morris Lawrence building. 677-5105 to reserve a space.

3. The NACAC National College Fair precedes the A2 one. Tuesday, March 27, 6:30-8:30 PM, Burton Manor, Livonia.

4. The Joyce Ivy Foundation provides scholarships to help young women from Michigan, Ohio and Nebraska in their pursuit of higher education opportunities at leading academic institutions.  Applications for Summer 2012 can be submitted NOW online at http://www.joyceivyfoundation.org. If you are a high-achieving female sophomore or junior who would benefit from a scholarship to attend a summer academic program at an Ivy League or other excellent college, please encourage her to visit http://www.joyceivyfoundation.org for more information. Deadline is March 19, 2012.

 

 

Colleges/Programs Visiting Community High!

 

The Experiment in International Living (EIL) visits Tuesday, March 13 at lunch and during Forum.

 

*University of Evansville (IN) Wed., 3/28, 11:30 AM)

 

Rustic Pathways International Exchange summer program, Monday, 4/9  11:10 AM

 

 

 

College Programs & Open Houses!

 

Madonna University (MI) Open House, 3/17, 9am Madonna.edu.events

 

Lawrence Tech (MI) Exploration Day, 3/23, 8am, explorationday.ltu.edu

 

*Roosevelt University (Chicago Campus) Open House, 3/24, 9:30-12:00 Noon

www.roosevelt.edu

 

Kenyon College (OH) features Junior Visit Day, 3/24/2012 register at www.kenyon.edu

 

UM Dearborn Engineering/Computer Science Experience, 3/24/12 www.engin.umd.umich.

 

*Purdue University Preview, Monday, 3/26, 6;30PM, The Doyle Center, 7275 Wing Lake Rd., Bloomfield Hills 48301  www.admissions.purdue.edu/PreviewPurdue

 

*Grand Valley State University Open Houses, 3/30, 4/6  www.gvsu.edu/visit

 

Oakland University’s Open House, 3/31, 9 AM    Oakland.edu/visit

 

Bryn Mawr College (PA) in View: 3/19, 4/9  www.brynmawr.edu/admissions/in-view

 

*Michigan State University’s Vet-A-Visit, Veterinary Medical Center Tours and Program, Saturday, April 14, 9-4 FREE communications@cvm.msu.edu

 

*University of Michigan-Dearborn’s Spring Open House, 4/14. 12-3:30 PM   umd.umich.edu/springopenhouse

 

Grove City College (PA) Open House, 4/14  8:15 AM  www.gcc.edu

 

*Purdue University sponsors it’s Juniors Exploring Engineering, Monday, 4/16, 8:00AM, sponsored by Women in Engineering. Register online at www.purdue.edu/WIEP

 

Wayne State University (MI) Preview Day  4/19, 9am  wayne.edu

 

Drew University (NJ) Open House 4/21  drew.edu/visit

 

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*John Boshoven is the invited and sponsored guest of Clark University (MA) to attend their ‘Emerging Adulthood Professional Development Symposium 3/17-19. Clark University is featured in the Loren Pope book, “Colleges That Change Lives.”

 

John Boshoven has been invited to join the Counselor Advisory Committee for the University of Toledo. He will be participating in their program 4/26-7. John currently serves on the national committees for the University of Michigan and the University of Chicago.

 

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*A college degree pays dividends for a lifetime, report finds  The Washington Post

Adults with at least a college degree went unemployed at about half the rate of those with only a high school degree during the Great Recession, according to a new report from the nonprofit College Board.

Among adults age 25 and older, unemployment hit 4.6 percent in 2009 for those with a four-year college degree, according to the report Education Pays 2010. The jobless rate for high school graduates that year was nearly double, 9.7 percent.

The college-educated have consistently found more work than those with only a high school diploma. But the recession magnified the gap. In 1999, by contrast, overall unemployment was 4 percent and the gap between jobless rates for college and high school graduates was 1.7 points.

The gap has widened in recent years. Between 2005 and 2009, the difference in unemployment rates between college and high school graduates grew from 2.3 points to 5.1 points.

"If it wasn't clear before, it should be abundantly clear now that a college graduate is far more competitive in today's workplace," said Gaston Caperton, the College Board president, in a statement.

Income increased more rapidly in recent years for college graduates, as well. As of 2008, college graduates earned $22,000 more a year than high school graduates, $55,700 vs. $33,800. A college graduate can now expect to earn two-thirds more in lifetime pay than a high school graduate.

The far-reaching report, released at midnight by the educational nonprofit, shows the college-educated living not only a more prosperous life but a healthier one:

Obesity rates were lower in 2008 for the college-educated, 20 percent, than for the high-school educated, 34 percent.

Rates of smoking declined from 14 percent to 9 percent among college-educated adults over the past decade, while the rate for high school graduates dipped only from 29 percent to 27 percent.

And college graduates were almost twice as likely in 2008 to exercise vigorously than high school graduates, 63 percent vs. 37 percent.

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*The Real Politics of School Counseling by Patrick O’Connor

I've decided it's time to amend the United States Constitution.

 

From now on, the only people who get to vote are school counselors.

 

This thought came to me after three weeks of nonstop phone calls to my house from presidential candidates. After listening to the logic and claims they were making to try and secure my vote, I was sure I had been exposed to this interesting kind of banter before-and, sure enough, I had.

 

"Dr. O'Connor?"

 

"Hi James."

 

"I came in because I need to change my schedule."

 

"Really? Didn't we just change it three days..."

 

"An issue has come to my attention that demands an immediate change of course in my educational objectives."

 

"Really? In three days?"

 

"It came to me like a vision in the night. I'm destined to be an engineer and lead society to a better world."

 

"Through engineering?"

 

"Absolutely. So if you'll just sign this drop and add slip..."

 

"James, you're asking to drop Algebra 2."

 

"Yes. That is my intention."

 

"But engineers need Algebra 2. In fact, you'll need to take Calculus by senior year."

 

"That information flies in the face of the consensus of my base."

 

"Your base?"

 

"Yes. My mother tells me that leading engineers are more in touch with their creative side than those who have studied the tired theories of the past, and my uncle is an engineer who doesn't even remember the quadratic formula."

 

"Wow. What kind of engineer is he? Civil? Chemical?"

 

"No. He works for Amtrak."

 

"But that's not the kind of -"

 

"Dr. O'Connor, I really need your support to make this lasting change that will lead to a brighter future for all."

 

"From Algebra 2."

 

"Right."

 

"To Ceramics?"

 

"If it weren't for ceramic engineers, we'd never have the tiles that created the heat shield on the space shuttle, the world-known fountain at Metro Airport, or that really cool toilet in the teacher's lounge."

 

"How do you know about-"

 

"I have my sources, Dr. O'Connor."

 

"So you're telling me this change is in the best interest of your educational well-being?"

 

"Not just mine, Dr. O'Connor. It's for the good of all."

 

"Including Amanda Bailey, I assume."

 

"Sorry-who?"

 

"Amanda Bailey. The girl who asked you to the Sadie Hawkins Dance out of the blue?"

 

"I am acquainted with Amanda."

 

"She has French 2 during the period you want to take Ceramics."

 

"Interesting."

 

"James, students in French 2 have first lunch, and so does Ceramics."

 

"And?"

 

"Algebra 2 has second lunch."

 

"Dr. O'Connor, I'm really not prepared to address that issue at this time. If you'd just sign this drop and add slip-"

 

"Tell you what, James. Why don't you leave it with me, and I'll run this request by a focus group."

 

"A focus group?"

 

"Yes. Your math teacher, the assistant principal, your mother, Amanda's mother. Once I have consensus, we'll all have a better sense of how to proceed."

 

"Actually, Dr. O'Connor, I think it might be prudent to suspend my plans at this time."

 

"I think that's wise, James. Better your plans get suspended then, oh, say, something else."

 

"Or someone else."

 

"Exactly."

 

 

 

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

2011-12 Testing Dates and Deadlines

ACT                                                                                                             The ACT Assessment Test assesses a high school student’s general educational development and their ability to complete college-level work. The multiple-choice tests cover four skill areas: English, Mathematics, Reading, and Science. The Writing Test, which is optional, measures skill in planning and writing a short essay. The ACT is generally taken by 11th Graders in the spring/summer of their Junior year of high school and by seniors retaking them to improve their scores. The ACT is also included as part of the Michigan Merit Examination (MME) and will be administered in school in March, 2012. http://www.actstudent.org

Test Date                              Registration Deadline

April 14                                  March 9

June 9                                    May 4

 

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SAT

         The SAT Reasoning Test is a measure of the critical thinking skills students need for academic success in college. The SAT is usually taken by 11th Graders in the spring of their Junior year in high school and retaken by seniors to improve their scores. Each section of the SAT is scored on a scale of 200-800, with two writing subscores for multiple-choice and the essay. 

2011-12 SAT National Test Dates     

Test Date                  Registration Deadline

May 5                         April 6

June 2                        May 8                                                                                                         

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News from PI High (Pioneer High, that is)

For more information about Ann Arbor Pioneer, see:  http://www.aaps.k12.mi.us/pioneer.home

 

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

The Rat Rap (Huron High, that is!)

 “Official Site”: http://www.aaps.k12.mi.us/huron.

 

 

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Ann Arbor Rec and Ed Study Skills Winter 2012

 

Learn to Study and Take Tests!

Grades 6-8 & Grades 9-12.  Do you have difficulty taking tests? Learn various study and test taking strategies that will help you prepare for upcoming test and quizzes.  This class will teach the effective skills you need to prepare test day!  Parents are strongly encouraged to attend class with you during the last meeting period. Instructor: Great Lakes Educational Group staff.  5 classes. No class 3/31, 4/7.

 

ID# 1327.201  (Gr. 6-8)          3/10-4/21                                 Saturday         

FEE: $95                                 9:00 AM – 10:30 AM             Tappan, Media Center

 

ID# 1327.202  (Gr. 9-12)        3/10-4/21                                 Saturday         

FEE: $95                                 9:00 AM – 10:30 AM             Tappan, Media Center

 

ACT Preparation Workshop

Grades 10-12. Enrolling in the ACT Preparation Workshop helps you prepare to successfully take the ACT test. This workshop is for students taking the ACT during the remainder of the calendar year. The best method for scoring well on the ACT and replacing anxiety with confidence is to be knowledgeable and well prepared. Information and strategies for each section of the test are included. Bring a CALCULATOR and a WATCH WITH A SECOND HAND. A manual is provided for each participant as part of the fee. Scholarship recipients pay $20.  Instructor: Great Lakes Educational Group staff. 1 class.

 

ID# 1329.203                          3/24                                         Saturday

FEE: $79                                 9:00 AM – 12 NOON                        Scarlett, Media Center

                                                           

 

Write and Edit a Winning College Application Essay

Parents and Students Grades 9-12. College admissions officers spend minutes reading an essay, so how can yours be as impressive as Mt. Everest—strong and memorable—and not an anonymous anthill? In the first session of this two-session class, learn the secrets to bringing out your unique writing voice and emphasizing your strengths without bragging, and then start writing.  Continue drafting essays at home after the first session and bring your drafts to the second session for feedback and editing tips. Handouts include samples of winning essays. Instructor: Debbie Eisenberg Merion. 2 classes.

 

ID# 1339.202              3/20, 3/27                                Tuesday

FEE: $69                     7:00 PM – 8:30 PM                Community, Room 213

Instructor:  Debbie Eisenberg Merion, M.S.W, is the owner of Essay Coaching (essaycoaching.com), which has helped thousands of students write winning college application essays since 2005.   She is the author of Solving the College Admissions Puzzle: A Guide for Students and Families About College Selection, Essay Writing and High-Stakes Testing with co-authors John Boshoven, M.S.W, and Geri Markel, Ph.D.  Debbie’s students have been admitted to Harvard, Yale, Columbia and other prominent universities. Her supportive, clear and effective techniques evolved from her experience in counseling, teaching college English, and 30 years of professional writing as an award-winning journalist and essayist.

 

 

 

Community-Wide Events

 

The Dawn Farm Education series will present the following FREE programs in March 2012 – and you’re invited!  (Please note that the presenters for both programs have changed from the presenters listed on the original flier.)

 

TITLE: In the Doctor's Office: Recovery Friend or Foe? 

DATE/TIME: Tuesday, March 20, 2012; 7:30 pm to 9:00 pm 

PRESENTERS: Mark A. Weiner, MD; Internal Medicine and Addiction Medicine; and Matt Statman, LLMSW, CADC. 

DESCRIPTION: It's been said that the doctor’s office is a dangerous place for people in recovery from addiction. It's also been said that recovering people are terrible patients. This program will discuss whether these statements are fair and why doctors and other healthcare providers are essential allies for long term recovery. We will describe in detail how recovering people can take responsibility for their physical health and how to recruit health care providers as allies. 

 

TITLE: Relapse Prevention 

DATE/TIME: Tuesday, March 27, 2012; 7:30 pm to 9:00 pm 

PRESENTERS: Jason Schwartz, LMSW; Dawn Farm Clinical Director; and Isaac Williamson, LMSW, Dawn Farm therapist.  

DESCRIPTION: The relapse process begins before alcohol/other drug use resumes. This program will discuss the dynamics of relapse, the warning signs that lead the chemically dependent person into a relapse, and strategies to prevent relapse and handle high-risk situations. 

 

All programs are presented in the St. Joseph Mercy Hospital Education Center auditorium at 5305 Elliott Drive, Ypsilanti.  All programs are FREE and open to all. People in recovery, people interested in recovery, family members and friends, people who work with those who are affected by chemical dependency, students, and anyone interested in attending are welcome! No registration is required. Each program is approved by the Michigan Certification Board for Addiction Professionals (MCBAP) to provide 1.5 free CE hours for addiction professionals. A certificate to document attendance for CE or other purposes will be provided on request.

 

 

  ~~~~~~~

The Office of Multicultural Affairs and Recruitment Initiatives at the University of Michigan School of Dentistry would like to invite your students to our upcoming Dental Emphasis Day on Saturday, March 31, 2011, 11:00AM-3:00PM. In an effort to expand the pipeline for underrepresented students interested in careers within the health profession, we would like to encourage you and your students to attend this event. Dental Emphasis Day is designed to provide high school students with a general overview of the field of dentistry, a hands-on learning experience, and plenty of opportunities to meet current dental and dental hygiene students.

 

++++++++

 

1/2 Price Tickets for University Musical Society concerts are available to high school students. A limited number of tickets are available for events 90 minutes before the concert time at the performance auditorium if the concert is NOT sold out. Tickets are sold on a first come, first served basis. Students must have a valid student I.D. and seating is assigned. Call 764-2538 to check ticket availability. http://www.ums.org/secondary/education/pub_prog_teens.htm

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Ann Arbor Civic Theater offers special student rates. All student tickets to all performances are only $10-12! Tickets are available in advance or at the door. Schedule is at http://www.a2ct.org.



***********

Selective Service Information: For 17 and 18 year old men, federal law requires that you register with Selective Service within 30 days of your 18th birthday. When register, you stay eligible for federal student loans, federal job training and jobs. You may register at http://www.sss.gov or at the post office.

   

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Ozone House

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826 Michigan

TUTORING Drop-in tutoring does not need to be registered for, you just drop-in. Free tutoring is offered Mon. - Thurs. from 3:30 - 5:30 at 826's location of E. Liberty, behind the Robot Store. Student 8 - 18 may drop in any time to get help with any subject. Students must show up to drop-in tutoring with homework or other assignments in hand. Drop-in tutoring encourages smiling, feeling good about oneself, grades going up, enthusiasm toward learning, and positivity. The intention of drop-in tutoring is to mentor, listen to, and help students with their homework needs.
Contact  amy@826michigan.org
phone: 734.761.3463
http://www.826michigan.org

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The Neutral Zone                                                                                       The Neutral Zone is a diverse, youth-driven teen center dedicated to promoting personal growth through artistic expression, community leadership and the exchange of ideas. Why would 3500 teens visit Neutral Zone in a month? Programs, programs, programs (and sometimes pizza – you just can’t go wrong with pizza!)

College Admission 101: 4/24, 4-6 PM

NZ Program Areas include:

Music & Technology
NZ holds weekend concerts and events for teens most Saturday nights. Teens also create, record and promote their own musical projects using NZ’s equipment and expertise.

Education
 Neutral Zone works hard to level the playing field for all teens through free drop-in tutoring, one-on-one mentoring, and a college prep program featuring college visits, ACT/SAT preparation, coaching on applications, essay writing, and financial aid, and opportunities for scholarships.

Literary & Visual Arts
Creative writers turn up the volume by writing original poetry and short stories, while photographers and videographers discover and explore their talents using state-of-the-art equipment in digital art classes.



Leadership
The Teen Advisory Council runs the show at Neutral Zone, while several different discussion groups offer young people an open, positive space to explore sensitive issues and just plain have fun together.

Drop-in
Teens come to NZ daily to shoot pool, play ping pong, use the internet, do homework, grab something to eat,or just hang out with friends in a safe, supervised space. For General Questions Contact, Lori Roddy, lori@neutral-zone.org, 734-214-9995




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Submissions:
Please submit your articles, news, or announcements  to boshoven@aaps.k12.mi.us. John B. Boshoven, Editor.

 
 

 

apPARENTly: 2/13/12

posted Sep 21, 2011, 2:45 PM by John Boshoven   [ updated Feb 14, 2012, 1:58 PM ]

apPARENTly

Community Parent & Student News You Can Use

February 6-10, 2012

National School Counseling week


http://a2community.org

CHS Dates and Events

Counseling News


Eye on the PI  (Pioneer High)

Rat Rap (Huron High)

Ann Arbor Public School Happenings   

Area Happenings


826Michigan


Neutral Zone


Join Together

Contact Us


 

CHS Dates and Events

2/6-10  National School Counseling Week

2/6       Dr. Green Visits CHS

            Counselors present to AAEA

2/7       SIT: 3:00

            Mom’s Unplugged

            Appreciate your Counselor’s hair day

2/8       State Count Day

            “Count your blessings” for your counselor day

            Counselor Proclamation by AAPS Board of Education

2/9       English MME Review

            Incoming 9th grade parent/student orientation 7:00

            Appreciate your Counselors’ Jokes Day

2/10     BSU Dance

            Lottery Applications Due

          “I’m Glad I got into CHS and My Counselor Drew My Name” Day

2/12    College Goal Sunday: Free FAFSA preparation at EMU

 

 

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      CHS News:

*1. Last night at the A2 District Library, Traverwood Branch. College Planning Night. Local college counselor John Boshoven, named one of the 2010 Counselors That Changes Lives, leads a discussion about college planning with educators, a career counselor, and a financial planner on  at 7 PM at the. The panelists are all parents who have helped their own children successfully navigate the college experience. Get some straight talk and valuable tips (and humor!) about college planning. Grade 9-Adult

 

2. Attention 10th and 11th graders, applications are still available to A2's premier programs for fall. Homebuilding, Cosmetology and Health Science applications are available in the Counseling Office. Deadline is THIS WEEK.

 

3. Order your Year Book now and Save $ Currently only $50.  Here is the link to buy a Community High Midnight Sun 2012 Volume 39 yearbook: http://jostensyearbooks.com/?REF=A03601630

Prices will go up February 20th - May 2012   $55

       

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Check out the latest stories on Community High's nationally-award-winning newspaper The Communicator Web (http://the-communicator.org). Also look for work from Community High Journalists on The Huffington Post High School Edition (http://www.huffingtonpost.com/high-school/).

 

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CHS Counseling News

All Students

1. Ann Arbor District Library sponsors its annual Short Story Writing Contest. Entries accepted January 30-March 16.  www.aadl.org or call 734-327.4291 or see your favorite CHS English teacher.

2. Visiting colleges or want to? Amtrak features 50% coupons for student and parents/guardians. To get your coupon, go to: http://www.campusvisit.com/amtrak.htm

3. Greyhound offers 15% discount for students with their “Student Advantage Card.” Also gives up to 50% discount on stuff. http://www.studentadvantage.com/nextstep

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Seniors

1. If your college has requested your mid-term (first semester) grades, you need to request that they be sent through Parchment.com.  If you contact Parchment before February 1, you MUST indicate that you are making a "Next Grading Period Request." Questions, please see your friendly Counselor or Karen in the Counseling Office.

 

*2. College HOPE***MEETS***Financial HELP. There’s money available for college. Let us help you get it. Parents of Graduating AAPS Seniors Come to Pioneer H.S. Cafeteria Annex  TONIGHT, Tuesday, February 7th  6-9 PM- Reservations Preferred* Accountants & Volunteers Will help You:

• Complete your 2011 Taxes on the spot!       

• Submit your FAFSA forms on the spot!

** Bring: •Copy of 2010 tax return, if available •Social Security Number or Individual Taxpayers' Identification Number (ITIN) for each family member •Proof of Income including W2s and 1099 forms •Documentation of deductible expenses •Account and routing numbers of checking/savings accounts for faster refund

*Contact Don Packard at packard@aaps.k12.mi.us or 994-1905x38619

 

 

3. College Goal Sunday happens at EMU’s Library on 2/12/12. Get free FAFSA/Financial Aid assistance, advice and support. There’s also scholarships to win at www.EduCash.org or at the event. Bring the parents, grandparents, but not the dog. (800) 832.2646

http://www.micollegegoal.org/

 

Juniors/Seniors

1. Thinking of a possible military career? The Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB) is offered for interested students Thursday, February 9 at Pioneer. This standardized test is used for admission and placement purposes by all the military branches and service academies. If you are interested, please register with Karen in the CHS Counseling office.

 

Juniors

Take advantage of the free ACT Prep program offered by Community High School. Please sign up for ACT FREE practice tests in the Counseling Office. There are two remaining to chose among (see schedule below)

Key Dates to Remember:

 

Feb. 8 Wednesday: ACT Practice III teach-back 3:30-4:30

 

Feb. 9 Wednesday: ACT Practice IV 3:30-7:00 Rm. #311

                               English Dept. Prep 2-3:30

                       

Feb. 16 Thursday: ACT Practice IV teach-back 3:30-4:30 Rm. #311

                               Mandatory Pre-test Session 2-3:30

 

Feb. 28 Tuesday:   Social Studies Dept. Prep. 2-3:00

                              Test-Taking Strategies Brown Bag Rm. #222

 

SCIENCE PREP. WILL TAKE PLACE IN FOS III; MATH PREP. WILL TAKE PLACE IN YOUR MATH CLASS (see Cherie if you DON’T have FOS III)

 

March 1 Thursday: Mandatory Pre-Test Makeup session 11:30-1:00

 

March 6 Tuesday: Day 1: ACT + Writing 7:50-1:00

 

March 7 Wednesday: Day 2: WorkKeys   7:50-11:20 

 

March 8 Thursday: Day 3: Michigan Math, Science, & Social Studies 7:50-10:50

 

March 19 Monday: MANDATORY PRE-TEST MAKE-UP 9:00-10:30

 

March 20 Tuesday: Day 1 make-up: ACT + Writing 7:50-1:00

 

March 21 Wednesday: Day 2 make-up: WorkKeys 7:50-11:20

 

March 22 Thursday: Day 3 make-up: MI Math, Science, & Social Studies 7:50-10:50

 

March 6-22:  Students with accommodations testing window

 

 

If you have other questions feel free to contact Cherie, in the office inside Rm. #212, at charbeneau@aaps.k12.mi.us,  or John or Diane in the Counseling Office 734/994-2027.

 

~~~~~~

Sophomores and Juniors

1. The Joyce Ivy Foundation provides scholarships to help young women from Michigan, Ohio and Nebraska in their pursuit of higher education opportunities at leading academic institutions.  Applications for Summer 2012 can be submitted NOW online at http://www.joyceivyfoundation.org. If you are a high-achieving female sophomore or junior who would benefit from a scholarship to attend a summer academic program at an Ivy League or other excellent college, please encourage her to visit http://www.joyceivyfoundation.org for more information. In 2012, 56 Joyce Ivy Foundation Summer Scholars received scholarships for summer programs at some of the best universities in the nation - Brown, Columbia, Cornell, Harvard, Johns Hopkins, Penn, Stanford and Yale.  For summer 2012, the Joyce Ivy Foundation plans to increase the number of full and partial scholarships to be awarded for Pre-College Summer Programs. These scholarships cover the cost of tuition, room and board, as well as related expenses such as books, fees, and travel to and from campus.  While our deadline is March 19, 2012, please apply early, as pre-college financial aid budgets tend to be consumed relatively early in the admissions cycle. We hope that you will visit http://www.joyceivyfoundation.org for more information and to watch our video featuring recent Joyce Ivy Summer Scholars.

 

 

College Programs

 

University of Detroit-Mercy School of Architecture  Career Day, 2/15, 12:00-3: 00  (800)635.5020 or admissionsevents@udmercy.edu

presents

 

~~~~~~~

 

*John Boshoven was the sponsored guest of Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, OH, Jan. 28-31, His observations follow:

     Future engineers abound! Strong engineering, management, accounting, science, anthropology art history, math, psych, nursing and dance program make this Cleveland school a good bet. It won’t be easy, though. Coursework is rigorous, students are motivated, and find the city exciting and growing. A building frenzy continues with hospital and research buildings encroaching on the once quiet central campus, and plans for a new central student center have some students hoping that student social live can be more collected. University Circle has been named one of the nation’s college beauty spots and Cleveland continues to fight its rust belt image with a refurbished cultural center, vibrant neighborhood restaurant districts and desirable lakeshore. Case still gives generous merit support for women in engineering and nursing students in general, and with only a 3 hour drive from Ann Arbor, makes this a real must-see. Classes tend to be smaller in arts and sciences than in the Case School of Engineering.  http://www.cwru.edu                                           Fiske****

 

+++++

 

*A Letter from The Superintendent

 

Dear Colleagues:

As you may be aware, next week is National School Counseling Week. This special week, set aside in each state, gives us an opportunity to thank our School Counselors for the role they play in helping our students achieve success and plan for a career.  The national theme this year is: “School Counselors: Helping Students Be Brilliant.”  Please pause for a moment and reflect on the unique role our Counselors play in our Ann Arbor Professional Learning Community and let our School Counselors know how appreciative we all are of the work that they do every single day!!! Pat them on the back for a job well done!!

 

The week is set-aside across the nation to honor School Counselors for the tremendous and important role they play in helping students examine their talents, strengths, abilities and their unique interests.  Our School Counselors work in professional partnerships with teachers and support personnel to provide opportunities for our students to reach their true potential.  All of our Ann Arbor educators focus their efforts on improving academic achievement for all students and School Counselors help as an integral part of a strong team in reducing barriers to learning and providing support that is necessary for students to achieve at the highest levels.

 

In her world-famous book, The Measure of Our Success, Marian Wright Edelman focuses on serving others when she says, “Be confident that YOU can make a difference.”  Here in Ann Arbor, our School Counselors make a difference in the lives of our young people in so many unique ways, and that difference that they are making is significant and impacts the future of our children and of Ann Arbor itself.

 

As our Counselors serve others, I want to personally thank them for the manner in which they have enriched the lives of all of our students and enhanced the goals of Ann Arbor Public Schools. Ann Arbor is about children… Each School Counselor continually impacts the world of our children and changes our students because they have chosen to serve them and be a part of their lives.  The entire notion of education is a living process of personal engagement between an adult and a student. Our School Counselors display a deep sense of responsibility, an understanding of the academic, social and emotional needs of our children and our School District, and a passion for making a difference in students’ lives.

 

During National School Counseling Week, I want to take the opportunity to pause for a moment and say thank you to all of our Ann Arbor School Counselors for making a difference in the lives of our children and our School District. As Superintendent, I am so very proud of all that our Counselors do and how they impact the excellence in Ann Arbor.

So, as we approach National School Counseling Week (February 6-10, 2012), the Ann Arbor Board of Education and I thank all of our School Counselors, with our deepest respect for the difference they are making as they serve others. Their public service on behalf of this great School District enhances the experiences of our children in so many  ways.  As Superintendent, I truly appreciate their significant contributions to our District’s success and the work that they do on behalf of our children. The School Board joins me in thanking our School Counselors for caring enough to make a difference on a daily basis in making this world a better place.  The emphasis and dedication to student achievement, safe schools, multiculturalism and diversity, human rights, parent and family involvement, child advocacy, social and emotional development, college and career planning, as well as community collaborations and partnerships are only some of the ways they enhance our School District and community.

 

As Superintendent of Schools and in conjunction with the Board of Education, we extend our personal and professional thanks to each of our School Counselors for a job well done, everyday, not just during National School Counseling Week. At the February 8, 2012 Board of Education Meeting, a Proclamation will be officially introduced in honor of all the Ann Arbor School Counselors for National School Counseling Week.

 

Most appreciatively yours,  Patricia P. Green, Ph.D.  

Superintendent of Schools                                       

Deb Mexicotte, President, Christine Stead, Vice-President, Irene Patalan, Treasurer, Andy Thomas, Secretary, Susan Baskett, Trustee, Simone Lightfoot, Trustee, Glenn Nelson, Trustee

 

 

*A Good Reason to Go See Your Counselor


February 6-10 is National School Counseling Week, and before you go rushing down to the mall to find the perfect card, let me save you the trip.  Try as you may, you will find nothing between the Valentine’s Day cards and the Mardi Gras cards (Mardi Gras cards?) that best expresses your feelings for your school counselor on the inside, with a picture of Snoopy, Hoops and Yo-Yo, or even Maxine on the outside—even though many suspect Maxine was a school counselor in a previous life.

This lack of commercial interest in National School Counseling Week is completely understandable, since no one really seems to know what school counselors do.  As a result, Congress won’t be adding another national holiday to February any time soon, especially since they already make Abraham Lincoln and George Washington share one day in February for their birthdays.

National School Counseling Week may not have anything on the Super Bowl, but there are still plenty of reasons to thank school counselors for all they are doing, and to thank them this week:



     The number of students they work with is far too high.  Christopher Tremblay at the University of Michigan-Dearborn estimates there are 459 students for every public school counselor, far above the recommended caseload of 250 students per counselor, and far more than the 225 or so students some high school teachers work with.  



     They teach more than one subject.  Considering teachers help students in only one subject (like English) and counselors help students with academic advising, personal counseling, career counseling, crisis management, college counseling, and getting to class on time, it’s understandable if they don’t have time to tell us what they do—they are too busy trying to do it.



      They can’t do a lot of counseling.  From scheduling to testing to discipline to being a last-minute sub for a Math class they aren’t certified to teach, counselors’ days are filled with activities that have nothing to do with helping students understand more about themselves or the world around them.  Try to cook 3-minute eggs in 30 seconds, and you’ll have some idea about a counselor’s typical day.



      They don’t get enough training.  Recent studies show counselors themselves admit they were poorly trained for the work they’re supposed to do, especially when it comes to college counseling and career advising.  They try and learn these skills on the job, but too often, they just don’t have the time.  This is changing, but it has a long way to go.



      They don’t get enough thanks.  Students applying to college never tell counselors when they get admitted, parents asking for advice never call back to tell them what happened, and students wanting personal advice are too busy looking forward to thank those who kept them from moving backwards.  Teachers see student progress in grades, but students don’t get graded in the counseling curriculum, since it’s tough to put a grade on a changed life.

Since a greeting card is out, what’s the best gift to give a caring counselor?  U-M’s Christopher Tremblay says if you have a spare 5 billion dollars, you could hire enough counselors to get the country to that dream caseload of 250 to 1—for a year.  If not, think about dropping an e-mail or note at the office, thanking the counselors for all they do, and asking what you can do to help.  That may not seem like much, but you’d be amazed what a few words of encouragement can do at the right time.

Just ask a school counselor.   –Patrick O’Connor

 

 

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

2011-12 Testing Dates and Deadlines

ACT                                                                                                             The ACT Assessment Test assesses a high school student’s general educational development and their ability to complete college-level work. The multiple-choice tests cover four skill areas: English, Mathematics, Reading, and Science. The Writing Test, which is optional, measures skill in planning and writing a short essay. The ACT is generally taken by 11th Graders in the spring/summer of their Junior year of high school and by seniors retaking them to improve their scores. The ACT is also included as part of the Michigan Merit Examination (MME) and will be administered in school in March, 2012. http://www.actstudent.org

Test Date

Registration Deadline

 

 

 

 

February 11

January 13

April 14

March 9

 

 

June 9                            May 4

~~~~~~~~~~~


SAT

         The SAT Reasoning Test is a measure of the critical thinking skills students need for academic success in college. The SAT is usually taken by 11th Graders in the spring of their Junior year in high school and retaken by seniors to improve their scores. Each section of the SAT is scored on a scale of 200-800, with two writing subscores for multiple-choice and the essay. 

2011-12 SAT National Test Dates     

Date                           Deadline

March 10                   February 10

May 5                         April 6

June 2                        May 8                                                                                                         

+++++++++

News from PI High (Pioneer High, that is)

 

Are you interested in playing Softball this spring?  *There is a very

important player and parent informational meeting Monday, February 6

beginning at 7 p.m. in the cafeteria annex.  If you cannot make it, go to

the athletic office for information.

 

If you are interested in a spring sport*, come to the athletic office

before classes, at lunch or the end of the day to get information.  The

spring season begins for ALL teams on Monday, March 12.

 

For more information about Ann Arbor Pioneer, see:  http://www.aaps.k12.mi.us/pioneer.home

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

The Rat Rap (Huron High, that is!)

 “Official Site”: http://www.aaps.k12.mi.us/huron.

 

 

+++++++

We are pleased to re-release the new edition of the AAPS News!

AAPS News provides you with all you need to know about what's happening in the Ann Arbor Public Schools. Today we're happy to announce some changes, featuring:

-A redesigned website, found at news.a2schools.org

-Social media accounts on Twitter and Facebook

-A page with information about the upcoming Tech Bond

We're also pleased to announce a giveaway: The first 100 people to "like" us on Facebook and to follow us on Twitter will be entered into a drawing for a $50 gift card to Nicola's Books! The winner will be announced next week. Read more about the new site and be sure to check in with us for daily updates!

 

 

+++++

Ann Arbor Rec and Ed

Study Skills Winter 2012

Study Skills Winter 2012

 

Learn to Study and Take Tests!

Grades 6-8 & Grades 9-12.  Do you have difficulty taking tests? Learn various study and test taking strategies that will help you prepare for upcoming test and quizzes.  This class will teach the effective skills you need to prepare test day!  Parents are strongly encouraged to attend class with you during the last meeting period. Instructor: Great Lakes Educational Group staff.  5 classes. No class 3/31, 4/7.

 

ID# 1327.201  (Gr. 6-8)          3/10-4/21                                 Saturday         

FEE: $95                                 9:00 AM – 10:30 AM             Tappan, Media Center

 

ID# 1327.202  (Gr. 9-12)        3/10-4/21                                 Saturday         

FEE: $95                                 9:00 AM – 10:30 AM             Tappan, Media Center

 

ACT Preparation Workshop

Grades 10-12. Enrolling in the ACT Preparation Workshop helps you prepare to successfully take the ACT test. This workshop is for students taking the ACT during the remainder of the calendar year. The best method for scoring well on the ACT and replacing anxiety with confidence is to be knowledgeable and well prepared. Information and strategies for each section of the test are included. Bring a CALCULATOR and a WATCH WITH A SECOND HAND. A manual is provided for each participant as part of the fee. Scholarship recipients pay $20.  Instructor: Great Lakes Educational Group staff. 1 class.

 

ID# 1329.201                          2/4                                           Saturday

FEE: $79                                 9:00 AM – 12 NOON                        Tappan, Media Center

 

ID# 1329.202                          3/3                                           Saturday

FEE: $79                                 9:00 AM – 12 NOON                        Tappan, Media Center

 

ID# 1329.203                          3/24                                         Saturday

FEE: $79                                 9:00 AM – 12 NOON                        Scarlett, Media Center

                                                           

 

Finding for the College that Fits

Parents & Students (Grades 9-12) together. Parents and students are faced with a myriad of choices about college. Let John help you and your student find and identify the resources in your family's search for the right college. Discussion will include what your student needs and wants from school, location, admissions possibilities and finances. This class is intended for parents and students to attend together. Instructor: John B. Boshoven, M.A., M.S.W. 1 class.

 

ID# 1337.201              2/29                                         Wednesday

FEE: $35                     7:00 PM – 8:30 PM                Community, Room 213

 

 

Paying for the College that Fits

Parents & Students (Grades 9-12) together. Find out where money for college comes from and how to get your fair share. Families will learn about sources of aid, the FAFSA, the College Scholarship Search Profile (CSS), and scholarship searches. Instructor provides resources to help find financial assistance for college. Instructor: John B. Boshoven, M.A., M.S.W. 1 class.

 

ID# 1341.201              3/7                                           Wednesday

FEE: $35                     7:00 PM – 8:30 PM                Community, Room 213

 

 

Write and Edit a Winning College Application Essay

Parents and Students Grades 9-12. College admissions officers spend minutes reading an essay, so how can yours be as impressive as Mt. Everest—strong and memorable—and not an anonymous anthill? In the first session of this two-session class, learn the secrets to bringing out your unique writing voice and emphasizing your strengths without bragging, and then start writing.  Continue drafting essays at home after the first session and bring your drafts to the second session for feedback and editing tips. Handouts include samples of winning essays. Instructor: Debbie Eisenberg Merion. 2 classes.

 

ID# 1339.202              3/20, 3/27                                Tuesday

FEE: $69                     7:00 PM – 8:30 PM                Community, Room 213

Instructor:  Debbie Eisenberg Merion, M.S.W, is the owner of Essay Coaching (essaycoaching.com), which has helped thousands of students write winning college application essays since 2005.   She is the author of Solving the College Admissions Puzzle: A Guide for Students and Families About College Selection, Essay Writing and High-Stakes Testing with co-authors John Boshoven, M.S.W, and Geri Markel, Ph.D.  Debbie’s students have been admitted to Harvard, Yale, Columbia and other prominent universities. Her supportive, clear and effective techniques evolved from her experience in counseling, teaching college English, and 30 years of professional writing as an award-winning journalist and essayist.

 

 

 

Community-Wide Events

 

* The Dawn Farm Education series will present the following FREE programs in February 2012:    

 

TITLE: The Physiology of Addiction 

DATE/TIME: Tuesday, February 21, 2012; 7:30 pm to 9:00 pm 

PRESENTER: Carl Christensen, MD, Ph.D.; Addictionologist 

DESCRIPTION: This program will explore the differences in neurochemistry between the addicted brain and the normal brain, the progression of physiological changes that occur in chemically dependent individuals, the mechanisms of physiologic tolerance and withdrawal, and the effects of treatment on the addicted brain. 

 

TITLE: Grief and Loss in Addiction and Recovery 

DATE/TIME: Tuesday, February 28, 2012; 7:30 pm to 9:00 pm 

PRESENTERS: Janice Firn, LMSW, Clinical Social Worker, University of Michigan Hospital; Matthew Statman, LLMSW, CADC, Dawn Farm therapist and Education Series Coordinator; and Barb Smith, author of “Brent’s World.” 

DESCRIPTION: This program will describe Worden's and Kubler-Ross' theories of grief and grief recovery, losses that the chemically dependent individual and his/her family experience throughout the addiction and recovery processes, and how recovery program tools can help individuals cope with grief and loss.  Barb will speak about her personal experiences with grief, loss and recovery. 

 

All programs are presented in the St. Joseph Mercy Hospital Education Center auditorium at 5305 Elliott Drive, Ypsilanti.  All programs are FREE and open to all. People in recovery, people interested in recovery, family members and friends, people who work with those who are affected by chemical dependency, students, and anyone interested in attending are welcome! No registration is required. Each program is approved by the Michigan Certification Board for Addiction Professionals (MCBAP) to provide 1.5 free CE hours for addiction professionals. A certificate to document attendance for CE or other purposes will be provided on request.

 

We'd like to invite you to attend, and we will be grateful for your help in informing others about these programs!  Further details and directions to the Education Center can be accessed from Dawn Farm's Web site athttp://www.dawnfarm.org/programs/education-series. You can also contact us at the Farm for further information: 734/485-8725, or info@dawnfarm.org.

 

The "Teens Using Drugs:  What To Know and What To Do" free, two-part workshop series will be presented from 7:30 pm to 9:00 pm on Tuesday February 7 (part one) and February 14 (part two.) The February programs will be presented by Brian Spitsbergen MA, LLPC, CAADC; Director, Community Intervention and Treatment, Growth Works, Inc., in classroom EC4 at the St. Joseph Mercy Hospital Education Center at 5305 Elliott Drive, Ypsilanti. This program is targeted primarily to parents/caretakers of teens and young adults but is inclusive of other family members, teens, professionals, students, people who sponsor or support teens, and others interested. Please note that this program does not provide MCBAP-approved CE. Please contact 734/973-7892 or tud@dawnfarm.org, or see http://www.teensusingdrugs.org for information.  

 

  +++++++++

 

*Interested in learning more about UM's national champion student Solar Car team? Then plan to attend The Premiere Screening of  "Racing With the Sun" at Ann Arbor's Michigan Theater. Wednesday, February 8. Doors open 6:30 PM

Program begins 7:00 PM

The film is 28 minutes long followed by a Q & A with UM Solar Car Team.

With a solar powered car designed and built by students, the U-M Solar Car Team joins the grueling World Solar Challenge race across the Australian Outback with one thought in mind - to win! 

 

Seating is limited to 150 people.

Free and open to the public.

Hope to see you there!

 

1/2 Price Tickets for University Musical Society concerts are available to high school students. A limited number of tickets are available for events 90 minutes before the concert time at the performance auditorium if the concert is NOT sold out. Tickets are sold on a first come, first served basis. Students must have a valid student I.D. and seating is assigned. Call 764-2538 to check ticket availability. http://www.ums.org/secondary/education/pub_prog_teens.htm

+++++++++++++++++

Ann Arbor Civic Theater offers special student rates. All student tickets to all performances are only $10-12! Tickets are available in advance or at the door. Schedule is at http://www.a2ct.org.



***********

Selective Service Information: For 17 and 18 year old men, federal law requires that you register with Selective Service within 30 days of your 18th birthday. When register, you stay eligible for federal student loans, federal job training and jobs. You may register at http://www.sss.gov or at the post office.

   

+++++++

826 Michigan

TUTORING Drop-in tutoring does not need to be registered for, you just drop-in. Free tutoring is offered Mon. - Thurs. from 3:30 - 5:30 at 826's location of E. Liberty, behind the Robot Store. Student 8 - 18 may drop in any time to get help with any subject. Students must show up to drop-in tutoring with homework or other assignments in hand. Drop-in tutoring encourages smiling, feeling good about oneself, grades going up, enthusiasm toward learning, and positivity. The intention of drop-in tutoring is to mentor, listen to, and help students with their homework needs.
Contact  amy@826michigan.org
phone: 734.761.3463
http://www.826michigan.org

+++++++++++++++++++

The Neutral Zone                                                                                       The Neutral Zone is a diverse, youth-driven teen center dedicated to promoting personal growth through artistic expression, community leadership and the exchange of ideas. Why would 3500 teens visit Neutral Zone in a month? Programs, programs, programs (and sometimes pizza – you just can’t go wrong with pizza!)

NZ Program Areas include:

Music & Technology
NZ holds weekend concerts and events for teens most Saturday nights. Teens also create, record and promote their own musical projects using NZ’s equipment and expertise.

Education
 Neutral Zone works hard to level the playing field for all teens through free drop-in tutoring, one-on-one mentoring, and a college prep program featuring college visits, ACT/SAT preparation, coaching on applications, essay writing, and financial aid, and opportunities for scholarships.

Literary & Visual Arts
Creative writers turn up the volume by writing original poetry and short stories, while photographers and videographers discover and explore their talents using state-of-the-art equipment in digital art classes.



Leadership
The Teen Advisory Council runs the show at Neutral Zone, while several different discussion groups offer young people an open, positive space to explore sensitive issues and just plain have fun together.

Drop-in
Teens come to NZ daily to shoot pool, play ping pong, use the internet, do homework, grab something to eat,or just hang out with friends in a safe, supervised space. For General Questions Contact, Lori Roddy, lori@neutral-zone.org, 734-214-9995




+++++++++

Join Together: For Your Health

*Binge Drinking: Risky And Widespread        by Scott Hensley

 

Binge drinking in America looks to be an even bigger problem than we thought.

About 1 in 6 Americans, or 17 percent of the population, went on at least one drinking binge in a month last year, according to the latest figures from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. That works out to 38 million people.

The same nationwide survey conducted in 2009 found that about 15 percent of Americans had indulged in a drinking binge.

How many drinks make a binge? For a woman, it's four or more at a sitting. For men, it's five and up.

 

Now, how come there's an apparent 2-percentage-point jump in binge drinking in one year? The CDC says a big factor is that the survey methods were tweaked to add more cellphone users to the mix. They tend to be younger.

But however you ask the questions, it's clear a lot of people are drinking excessively — and quite often. "What we're talking about is a risky behavior that is quite widespread in the population," Dr. Robert Brewer, head of the CDC's alcohol program said in a media briefing Tuesday.

In the analysis, the CDC looked at how often people binge and how many drinks they consume when they do. For those who binge, the average number of binges a month is more than four. And during those sessions, the bingers consume nearly eight drinks.

Men binge more often than women. And the guys drink more during each session. Beer is the most likely beverage to be involved in binges, Brewer said, citing previous research.

The prevalence of binge drinking was highest among young people, 18 to 34, at 28 percent. And they drink the most, too: about nine drinks per session. Nine!

But, in a bit of surprise, the most frequent bingers were the oldest. Among binge drinkers who were 65 and up, the average number of binges per month is 5.5.

As was the case in the last survey, the well-heeled had the highest rate of binge drinking at 20 percent.

As bad as these numbers may look, the reality is worse. "We know this is a substantial underestimate," the CDC's Brewer says, because it relies on people's reports of their own drinking behavior. Another recent study that looked at alcohol showed that approach misses a lot of alcohol consumption. [Copyright 2012 National Public Radio]

To learn more about the NPR iPhone app, go to http://iphone.npr.org/recommendnprnews

 

Submissions:
Please submit your articles, news, or announcements  to boshoven@aaps.k12.mi.us. John B. Boshoven, Editor.

 
 

 

apPARENTly: Community Parent & Student News You Can Use

posted Jun 2, 2011, 5:01 AM by John Boshoven

June 1, 2011


http://www.aaps.k12.mi.us/community.counseling/apparently

*Added Since Last Edition of apPARENTly

CHS Dates and Events

CHS News

PTSO News

Counseling News


Eye on the PI  (Pioneer High)

Rat Rap (Huron High)

Ann Arbor Public School Happenings   

Area Happenings


826Michigan


Neutral Zone


Join Together

Good Smile and Worth Pondering Proverbs

Contact Us


 

CHS Dates and Events

6/2, 7 Incoming 9th graders check in

6/13 Block 7 Exam & Registration

6/14 Block 1& 2 Final Exam

6/15 Block 3 & 4 Final Exam

6/16 Block 5 & 6 Exam

6/17 Bye, bye

8/15 Counselors Return to CHS

8/22 Split enrollment begins: 8:00 AM

++++++++++++++++++++++++++

CHS News and Happenings:

Math Tutors needed for Next Year

If you are interested in helping your fellow Community High

students with their math next year. Consider leaving a block

open to tutor during the following blocks:

Block 2

Block 4

Block 6

Block 7

Talk to Craig, Anne, or Marci about your interest, and sign up at

registration so that we can be sure to have enough tutors for

every block right at the beginning of the year next year.

Thanks for helping make Community great! 


Consider helping to tutor for the rest of

year too...

Since many of our current math tutors were Seniors, we are

needing some extra help in the Math Support classes to get

everyone ready for finals. Please let Craig, Anne, or Marci

know if you can help out for the next two weeks during blocks

1,3,5,6 or 7. 

 ************************************************************************************

It's TIME! Time for you to subscribe to the new CHS Counseling Pages. If you'd like to continue to receive apPARENTLY, Scholarship or and/or Summer Opportunity Updates, please click this link.

https://sites.google.com/a/aaps.k12.mi.us/chs-counseling/home

Enter your email address into one or more of the subscription boxes that you wish to receive updates from. You will receive an email from feedburner asking you to confirm your subscription by clicking a link in the message. Once you've confirmed, you will begin receiving updates when a new feature or edition is posted. 

 ~~~

The PTSO offers the Scrip Program.  Contact Kathy Gabriel, through the Main Office, if you are interested.

 

++++++

CHS Counseling News

All Students

1. Visiting colleges or want to? Amtrak features 50% coupons for student and parents/guardians. To get your coupon, go to: http://www.campusvisit.com/amtrak.htm

2. Greyhound offers 15% discount for students with their “Student Advantage Card.” Also gives up to 50% discount on stuff. http://www.studentadvantage.com/nextstep

 

Rising Seniors

*1. Swarthmore College (PA) presents it Discover Program, 9/24-26, for interested students of color. See John B. for info. Deadline to apply: 6/24/11

*2.  Bates College (ME) announces its Prologue to Bates, a fall open house  (10/9-11, 11/13-15) for multi-cultural students. See John B. for information.

*3. Scripps College 9CA) features it Fly-In Diversity Program in September. See John B. for info. Deadline to apply: June 20. 

*4. Macalester College (MN) features its Fall Sampler program for multi-cultural students 9/22-25, 10/6-9) See John B. for Q's.


Rising Seniors and Juniors 

*1. UM-Dearborn features it College Prep Transition Workshop. 6/21, 6-9 PM. Info at umd.umich.edu/transitions

*2. Hope College features its Summer Research Day, 6/23, 9:30-3:00. Info at hope.edu/admissions

3. The 2011 QuestBridge College Prep Scholarship program, which provides more than 1,000 awards that equip high school juniors with the knowledge necessary to compete for admission to leading colleges. The College Prep Scholarship educates academically outstanding juniors from low-income backgrounds about the many options that exist for them at selective colleges, and helps them to become competitive applicants at these institutions. Through one free application, students can access multiple opportunities, including:

   * 10 full scholarships to college summer programs at Emory, Harvard, Stanford, Notre Dame, Penn, and Yale

    * 20 Quest for Excellence Awards such as new laptops, college visits, and scholarships to college summer programs

    * 40 awards of college admissions counseling provided by experienced QuestBridge staff

    * 1,000 invitations to QuestBridge College Admissions Conferences at Stanford and Yale

    * 100 all-expense-paid visits to leading colleges

    * Please see John B. about nominating you for this terrific program!


 

*John Boshoven was the sponsored guest of Evergreen State College (WA) and DePaul University (IL) His observations:

The Evergreen State College, Olympia, Washington

A “Fiske Best Buy,” this alternative “woodsy” place has as its unofficial motto, “Let it all hang out.” It’s printable motto has evolved to, “Un-compromised liberal arts education in progress.” Indeed, since 1971 this Puget Sound experiment has been a success in allowing students to shape the focus, scope and sequence of their education. There are no required classes, but many students are drawn to their highly-praised environmental science program given this pristine setting outside of one of America’s loveliest state capitals. Its kids are smart, yet questioning. Its professors are smart, eager, lively and open to any/every suggestion. Courses are taught in true interdisciplinary fashion, and designed by the faculty with student and administration input. Students are “graded” with written evaluations, and students are integral in self-analysis.  Here, students are in the driver’s seat- “It’s all about you- we’re looking to tap into the student passion.” And tap they do, at state college rates. All I can say is wow, what a setting, what a program, what a great place for students who want to grab their own education and run with it!

http://www.evergreen.edu   Fiske***




DePaul UniversityChicago, Illinois

         DePaul has risen in stature and size as the nation’s largest Catholic college (25,145 at last count). Chicago’s version of NYU, its trendy and cool 36 acre Lincoln Park address adds to the gentile and friendly nature of its campus. Its high-rise Loop Campus makes its internships, departments of Commerce, Communication and Computing and Digital Media programs relevant and in close proximity to the urban setting where its grads hope to live and work. DePaul is test-optional, not highly selective (except Theater and Music) and a happy, urban place. Students like their 10 week quarters (my tour guide called that a brilliant invention), study abroad, interdisciplinary opportunities and diverse student body. Job placement, internships and Co-Ops are touted, as 36,000 alum live in a 30-mile radius providing great contacts. It’s all about the city here, so farm friends head out. It’s fun, young, active, rapid and social at the home of the Blue Demons.                www.depaul.edu

 

John Boshoven has been selected to join the Inaugural  National Counselor Advisory Committee for the University of Chicago by James Nondorf, the Dean of College Admissions and Financial Aid. He will attend their first meeting on June 26th in Chicago.

*John Boshoven is the invited and sponsored guest of the University of Colorado, University of Denver and Colorado College June 6-8. He will also be the invited and sponsored guest of Warren Wilson College, Asheville NC on June 14-15. 

 

 

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

2010-11 Testing Dates and Deadlines

ACT                                                                                                             The ACT Assessment Test assesses a high school student’s general educational development and their ability to complete college-level work. The multiple-choice tests cover four skill areas: English, Mathematics, Reading, and Science. The Writing Test, which is optional, measures skill in planning and writing a short essay. The ACT is generally taken by 11th Graders in the spring/summer of their Junior year of high school and by seniors retaking them to improve their scores. The ACT is also included as part of the Michigan Merit Examination (MME) and will be administered in school in March, 2011. http://www.actstudent.org

Test Date

Registration Deadline

June 11, 2011

May 6, 2011

 

~~~~~~~~~~~


SAT

         The SAT Reasoning Test is a measure of the critical thinking skills students need for academic success in college. The SAT is usually taken by 11th Graders in the spring of their Junior year in high school and retaken by seniors to improve their scores. Each section of the SAT is scored on a scale of 200-800, with two writing subscores for multiple-choice and the essay. 

2010-11 SAT National Test Dates     

Test Date

  Registration Deadline

 

June 4, 2011            May 6, 2011                                                                                                         


+++++++++

News from PI High (Pioneer High, that is)

For more information about Ann Arbor Pioneer, see:  http://www.aaps.k12.mi.us/pioneer.home

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

The Rat Rap (Huron High, that is!)

 “Official Site”: http://www.aaps.k12.mi.us/huron.

 

Community-Wide Events

*We have two terrific  Dawn Farm Education Series programs for June 2011, described below.  The June programs will end the 2010 – 2011 series.  We plan to kick-off the 2011 – 2012 series in September 2011.

 

We’d be grateful for YOUR OPINIONS please – what programs/topics/presenters would you be interested in having included in the next series? What other ideas do you have that will help the Education Series be a useful resource for you and others? Please let us know your ideas! You can email Matt Statman, the Education Series Coordinator, at mstatman@dawnfarm.org or call us at 734/485-8725.

 

June programs will include:

 

TITLE: Tobacco Cessation and Addiction Recovery 
DATE/TIME: June 21, 2011; 7:30 pm to 9:00 pm 
PRESENTER: Anna Byberg; Dawn Farm Project Manager. 
This program will describe the prevalence of tobacco addiction among alcoholics and drug addicts, the relationship between tobacco use and recovery, and basic information about how to quit using tobacco. 

TITLE: 
Eating Disorders 
DATE/TIME: June 28, 2011; 7:30 pm to 9:00 pm 
PRESENTERS: Carl Christensen, MD, Ph.D., Addictionologist; and Lori Perpich, LLP, MS Clinical Behavioral Psychology; Cognitive Behavior Therapist and EDEN Program Facilitator 
This program will examine the evidence that eating disorders are true biopsychosocial diseases, similar to chemical dependency. The program will define various eating disorders and their consequences, explore neurobiological theories of addiction, describe physiological consequences of eating disorders, discuss screening tools, and provide information on treatment options and resources for eating disorders. 
 

All programs are presented in the St. Joseph Mercy Hospital Education Center auditorium at 5305 Elliott Drive, Ypsilanti.
  All programs are FREE and open to all. People in recovery, people interested in recovery, family members and friends, people who work with those who are affected by chemical dependency, students, and anyone interested in attending for any reason are all welcome! No registration is required. Each program is approved by the Michigan Certification Board for Addiction Professionals (MCBAP) to provide 1.5 free CE hours. A certificate to document attendance for CE or other purposes will be provided on request.

 

We'd like to invite you to attend, and we will be grateful for your help in informing others about these programs!  Further details and directions to the Education Center can be accessed from Dawn Farm's Web site athttp://www.dawnfarm.org/programs/education-series. You can also contact us at the Farm for further information: 734/485-8725, or info@dawnfarm.org.

 

Thank you to all who have attended Education Series programs, provided feedback to us, and/or shared information with others. Thank you for helping us make the Education Series a success!

The "
Teens Using Drugs:  What To Know and What To Do" two-part workshop series will be presented on June 7 (part one) and June 14 (part two.) Our long-time friend and former board member Ron Harrison developed and formerly presented this program. The June programs will be presented by Matt Statman, LLMSW, CADC; Dawn Farm therapist. Dawn Farm plans to continue this program in the 2011 – 2012 school year; details are in process. Please contact us or see http://www.teensusingdrugs.org for information.

 

Peace,

 

James Balmer, President
Dawn Farm

~~~~~~

*Ivy Insiders presents FREE SAT and ACT Workshops:

SAT Practice, 6/16, 1-5 PM                                                                                                                                 ACT Workshop 6/20    1-4 PM                                                                                                                          SAT Workshop 6/21  1-4 PM                                                                                                                      Practice ACT  6/25 1-5 PM  Ann Arbor District Library.                                                                                 Q's? www.ivyinsiders.com

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

*Youth Senate

Having trouble getting a summer job? Build a GREAT resume with REAL job skills and GOOD references by joining a weeklong Community Volunteer Team. E-mail: senate@youthempowerment.com Join students across the District for a CHARITY DodgeBall Tournament hosted by the Youth Senate on Friday afternoon June 17 at Burns Park. This is to help homeless youth. See "Dodging Poverty" on Homepage. 


1/2 Price Tickets for University Musical Society concerts are available to high school students. A limited number of tickets are available for events 90 minutes before the concert time at the performance auditorium if the concert is NOT sold out. Tickets are sold on a first come, first served basis. Students must have a valid student I.D. and seating is assigned. Call 764-2538 to check ticket availability. http://www.ums.org/secondary/education/pub_prog_teens.htm

+++++++++++++++++

Ann Arbor Civic Theater offers special student rates. All student tickets to all performances are only $10-12! Tickets are available in advance or at the door. Schedule is at http://www.a2ct.org.



***********

Selective Service Information: For 17 and 18 year old men, federal law requires that you register with Selective Service within 30 days of your 18th birthday. When register, you stay eligible for federal student loans, federal job training and jobs. You may register at http://www.sss.gov or at the post office.

   

+++++++

826 Michigan

TUTORING Drop-in tutoring does not need to be registered for, you just drop-in. Free tutoring is offered Mon. - Thurs. from 3:30 - 5:30 at 826's location of E. Liberty, behind the Robot Store. Student 8 - 18 may drop in any time to get help with any subject. Students must show up to drop-in tutoring with homework or other assignments in hand. Drop-in tutoring encourages smiling, feeling good about oneself, grades going up, enthusiasm toward learning, and positivity. The intention of drop-in tutoring is to mentor, listen to, and help students with their homework needs.
Contact  amy@826michigan.org
phone: 734.761.3463
http://www.826michigan.org

+++++++++++++++++++

The Neutral Zone                                                                                       The Neutral Zone is a diverse, youth-driven teen center dedicated to promoting personal growth through artistic expression, community leadership and the exchange of ideas. Why would 3500 teens visit Neutral Zone in a month? Programs, programs, programs (and sometimes pizza – you just can’t go wrong with pizza!)

NZ Program Areas include:

Music & Technology
NZ holds weekend concerts and events for teens most Saturday nights. Teens also create, record and promote their own musical projects using NZ’s equipment and expertise.

Education
 Neutral Zone works hard to level the playing field for all teens through free drop-in tutoring, one-on-one mentoring, and a college prep program featuring college visits, ACT/SAT preparation, coaching on applications, essay writing, and financial aid, and opportunities for scholarships.

Literary & Visual Arts
Creative writers turn up the volume by writing original poetry and short stories, while photographers and videographers discover and explore their talents using state-of-the-art equipment in digital art classes.



Leadership
 The Teen Advisory Council runs the show at Neutral Zone, while several different discussion groups offer young people an open, positive space to explore sensitive issues and just plain have fun together.


Drop-in
Teens come to NZ daily to shoot pool, play ping pong, use the internet, do homework, grab something to eat,or just hang out with friends in a safe, supervised space. For General Questions Contact, Lori Roddy, lori@neutral-zone.org, 734-214-9995




+++++++++

News from Join Together: Communities and Families Working Together
http://www.jointogether.org

 

~~~~~~~~~~

Good Smile:

*If I agreed with you, we’d both be wrong.

What you don’t see with your eyes, don’t invent with your mouth.

 

 

 

&&&&&&&&&&&&&


 

Submissions:
Please submit your articles, news, or announcements by TUESDAY noon to boshoven@aaps.k12.mi.us. John B. Boshoven, Editor.

posted Mar 15, 2011, 11:26 AM by John Boshoven   [ updated Mar 15, 2011, 12:16 PM ]


Tuesday, March 22, 2011

posted Feb 9, 2011, 7:02 AM by John Boshoven   [ updated Mar 22, 2011, 12:26 PM ]

apPARENTly

The CHS News to Know!        *Added Since Last Edition of apPARENTly

CHS Dates and Events

CHS News

PTSO News

Counseling News


Eye on the PI  (Pioneer High)

Rat Rap (Huron High)

Ann Arbor Public School Happenings   

Area Happenings


826Michigan


Neutral Zone


Join Together

Good Smile and Worth Pondering Proverbs

Contact Us


 

CHS Dates and Events

3/24  Parent/Teacher Conferences 3:30-6:30 
3/29  9th Grade Vision Screening
4/4-8  Spring Break
4/11  School Resumes
4/14  NHS Installation
4/20  SIT  3:30
4/21 School Closed
4/25  School Resumes
4/27  NSAU Garlic Mustard Pull, Early Release 12:00 Noon
4/28  Arts, Science & letters 7:00 PM 

++++++++++++++++++++++++++

CHS News and Happenings:

Two Community High School teams participated in the Eastern Regional of the Michigan High School Mock Trial Tournament on Saturday, March 12th.  Team A advances to the state finals tournament in Lansing on March 26th.  They will defend their state championship title.  Team B won an honorable mention award, finishing in the top 15 of 37 teams.  

 

Team B members:  Galen Burrell, Isaac Fink, Gabe Hillebrand, Rianna Johnson-Levy, Julia Karr, Leah Penner, Dan Roy, Jeremy Simon, Kelsey Teribery, Yasaf Warshai

 

Team A members:  Shadi Ahmadmehrabi, Cooper DePriest, Michelle Grifka, Max Lewis, Michael Savage, Tressa Stapleton, Eli Sugerman, Elise Wander, Garrett Wood

 

Official Timers:  Preston Horvath, Nate Porter  

 Coaches:  Cheryl Grace, teacher coach; drama coach:  Billie Ochberg; attorney coaches: Griffith Dick and Robert West


~~


March is Depression Awareness Month. The Guidance Department can provide direction and resources for treating adolescent depression. Call 994-2027 for more information.

Our neighbors are remodeling! Yes, Zingerman's has begun their renovations. During the construction, Zingerman's is paying for 5 student/guest parking spots. Attached are the directions for the over flow parking. The meters are bagged - you need either a CHS Parking sticker or  CHS parking pass from the Main Office.

FREE VERSE ON SALE - SEE JUDITH

Order Your Yearbooks - http://www.jostens.com; click on Buy Your Yearbook; search for Community High School in Ann Arbor; Buy now, it is only $45.

CHS is looking for junior and senior parent volunteers to assist with the planning and chaperoning for the Junior Senior Prom. This year’s Prom will be held at Eastern Michigan University on Friday, May 13, 2011. The DJ has been reserved, but we need to work with the Seniors on the theme, tickets, decorations and food. Please call Katy or Chris in the Main Office, if you are interested in volunteering. Once we have the volunteers, we’ll schedule the first meeting.
 
The Mighty Quinn’s Writing Lab: If you need help with a school paper, creative writing project, or college essay, stop by the Library on Wednesdays and Thursdays from 12:45 - 1:45 (during 5th or 6th block). Quinn Strassel will be there to provide feedback and help (with the assistance of volunteers from 826 Michigan).  
 The PTSO offers the Scrip Program.  Contact Kathy Gabriel, through the Main Office, if you are interested.
Visit the-communicator.org to catch up on the latest school news and read students’ work.

++++++

CHS Counseling News

All Students

1. Check out Malcolm Gladwell's well crafted article in a recent New Yorker on "college rankings."  http://www.ctcl.org/files/pdfs/RankingsNewYorkerGladwell-1.pdf

2. Visiting colleges or want to? Amtrak features 50% coupons for student and parents/guardians. To get your coupon, go to: http://www.campusvisit.com/amtrak.htm

3. Greyhound offers 15% discount for students with their “Student Advantage Card.” Also gives up to 50% discount on stuff. http://www.studentadvantage.com/nextstep



Seniors
Attention CHS Seniors and Families!!!

YOUR scholarships are here:

This includes the Barker, Hall  and CHS' most prestigious scholarship, the BARTMAN!  
Please read below for the qualifications and specifications. All entries will be online at:

1. Bruce & Merlee Bartman Fund - Bruce Bartman Memorial Scholarship 
Average grant amount $1,000 Number of grants 1 

Be a 2011 graduate of Community High School 

Be a Community High School student for at least one year 

Demonstrate the ability to make use of Community High School’s alternative program (includes courses taught by CHS staff, independent studies, community resource courses, etc.) 

Demonstrate your contributions to Community High School 

Interviews and/or application reviews will be conducted Spring 2011 

Submit online application 

Latest transcript required 

Answer the following two questions (upload and submit as attachment(s) to application): 
1. In what ways have you most benefited from Community High School? 
2. In what ways have you most contributed to Community High School? 


2. Joseph & Yvonne Dulin Scholarship Fund 
Grant amount: $250 Number of grants : 2 
Be a 2011 graduate of any Ypsilanti Public School or Ann Arbor Public School 
Minimum GPA 2.5 
Be a resident of Washtenaw County 
Demonstrate volunteer service and commitment to education/educational goals 
Priority will be given to disadvantaged students - e.g. financial need, mentally, socially, emotionally, physically handicapped, in foster care, homeless, etc. 
Latest transcript 
Letter of recommendation 


3. Nathan Lyndell Hall Memorial Scholarship Fund 
Minimum grant amount $500 Number of grants 3 

Be a 2011 graduate from Pioneer High School (must have four consecutive years of participation in one high school sport) OR 

Be a 2011 graduate from Community High School OR 

Be a 2011 graduate and an alumni of Ypsilanti Junior Football and Cheerleading (YCJAA) (must have four consecutive years of participation in one high school sport & two years of participation in YCJAA) 
AND 

Be accepted to a two-year or four-year college or university to pursue a degree 

Have two years of community service involvement during high school 

Minimum GPA 3.2 

Submit online application 

Latest transcript required 

Provide description of how your involvement in community service has impacted your life (upload as attachment to application) 

Provide essay on the following topic (upload as attachment to application): 

“No Regrets” by Nathan Lyndell Hall 
This tattoo was my gift to myself for my eighteenth birthday. I didn’t get it because it’s “cool” to get tattoos these days; I got it because it is what I live my life by. I started to believe, a long time ago, that everything I do makes me a better person in the end. No matter what. I choose to learn from everything I do instead of dwell on how I could have done it differently. I don’t see the point in worrying about something I can’t change. I just plan on doing it right the next time. 
What does this philosophy of life mean to you? 
On the application, please indicate which Hall Scholarship you are applying for: 
1. Pioneer High School OR 
2. Community High School OR 
3. YCJAA 


4. NAACP Community Leadership Scholarship Fund 
Average grant amount $250 Number of grants 2 

Be an African-American 2011 high school graduate 

Be from the Ypsilanti-Willow Run area or the Ann Arbor area 

Have been accepted to an accredited two-year or four-year college or university 

Minimum GPA 2.5 

Have in some way demonstrated community involvement and leadership potential 

Recipients will be chosen on the basis of: 1) Financial need; 2) Scholarship potential; and 3) Community service and/or Leadership potential 

Submit online application -indicate Ypsilanti-Willow Run OR Ann Arbor Scholarship. 

Latest transcript required 

One or two recent (within one year) letters of recommendation from individuals not related to applicant required. Scanned copies of letters already written and uploaded as attachments are acceptable. 

Provide short essay or personal statement on the following topic: 

“How I will continue to serve my community” (upload as attachment to application) 


5. Bryan J Westfield Scholarship Fund 
Average grant amount: $500 Number of grants: 1 

Be a 2011 female graduate of Pioneer High School (Roberto Clemente, Stone, or Community student-athletes who participated for Pioneer are eligible) 

Have received a varsity letter in Pioneer Women’s track & field and/or cross country team(s) 

Meet athletic eligibility requirements at the time of graduation 

Although the award is merit based, other factors such as financial need and applicants from historically disadvantaged backgrounds may be taken into consideration, but are not criteria for receipt of the award. 

Be attending an institution of higher education in Fall 2011 

Applicants must disclose if they are receiving any athletic scholarships or have applied for other scholarships. 

Scholarship is non-renewable and may only be used for books and tuition 

Submit online application 

Latest transcript required 

At least one letter of recommendation required (must be from someone independent of the scholarship fund and unrelated to the Westfield family) 


6. Morse B. Barker Memorial Scholarship Fund (deadline April 1, 2011) 
Average grant amount $1,000 for Washtenaw Community College; $1,500 for Cleary University 
Number of grants 50 (approx.) 
Applications must be made through Cleary University, Washtenaw Community College, the STRIVE Program at Stone High School, or Ann Arbor Public Schools. 

Will attend Cleary University or Washtenaw Community College Fall 2011 

Demonstrate financial need 

Be a permanent resident of Washtenaw County 

Be between the ages of 18 and 30 

Be enrolled in at least nine credit hours 

Declare a particular program of study or major field 

Minimum GPA 2.0 

Be a non-smoker 

Submit online application (printed copy of application may also be required) 

On the online application, please indicate which Barker Scholarship you are applying for (select only one): 
- AAPS (current high school seniors planning to attend WCC or Cleary) OR 
Washtenaw Community College (current WCC students) OR 
Cleary University (current Cleary students) OR 
STRIVE (currently participating in STRIVE program at Stone High School) 

Latest transcript required 

At least one letter of recommendation required 

Though not a requirement, applicants are strongly encouraged to fill out and submit a FAFSA (Free Application for Federal Student Aid) 

7. The GE-Reagan Foundation Scholarship Program offers $10K/yr. for leaders, scholars and financially needy students athttp://www.reaganfoundation.org/GE-RFScholarships.aspxDeadline to apply: March 18, 2011


Juniors and Seniors
Michigan State University presents it's Day at State Program, an opportunity for juniors and seniors to visit for the day and night. Reservations must be made 2 weeks in advance. Spring deadline is April 15, 2011. More info. and regsitratio is at www.dayatstate.msu.edu.


Juniors
1. The USC/Chevron Frontiers of Energy Resources Summer camp 2011 is open to Juniors this summer at US. Tuition and fee are provided, but not transportation. Check it out at:
http://cisoft.usc.edu/uscchevron-frontiers-of-energy-resources-summer-camp/

2. The 2011 QuestBridge College Prep Scholarship program, which provides more than 1,000 awards that equip high school juniors with the knowledge necessary to compete for admission to leading colleges. The College Prep Scholarship educates academically outstanding juniors from low-income backgrounds about the many options that exist for them at selective colleges, and helps them to become competitive applicants at these institutions. Through one free application, students can access multiple opportunities, including:

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Colleges/Programs Visiting Communty High and Ann Arbor

Columbia University, NYC, French Collaboration, Friday, March 25, 11:45

Lawrence University (WI), Wednesday, March 30, 11:15

College and Career Fair, Wednesday, March 30, 6:00-8:00, Pioneer HS: Colleges attending:  Adrian College, Albion College, Alma College, Amherst College, Baker College, Ball State University, Beloit College, Bowdoin College, Bowling Green University, Butler University, Carleton College, Central Michigan University, Cleary College, Cleveland State University, Colgate University, College of Creative Studies, College of Wooster, Columbia College, Chicago, Columbus School of Art & Design, Concordia University, Denison University, DePaul University, DePauw University, Dickinson College, Drexel University, Eagle Flight Center, Earlham College, Eastern Michigan University, Ferris State University, Grand Valley State University, Grove City College, Harvard University, Hillsdale College, Hiram College, Hope College, Illinois Wesleyan University, Indiana Tech, Kalamazoo College, Kendall College of Art & Design, Kenyon College, Kettering University, Knox College, Lawrence University, Lehigh University, Madonna University, Marietta College, Miami University, Michigan State University, Michigan Technological University, Middlebury College, Mount Holyoke College, Niagara University, Northern Michigan University, Northwood University, Oakland University, Ohio Northern University, Ohio State University, Ohio Wesleyan University, Otterbein College, Purdue University, Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology, Rutgers University, Saint Mary’s College - Notre Dame, Schoolcraft College, Siena Heights University, Smith College, Syracuse University, Trine University, Tufts University, U.S. Military Academy, University of Arizonia, University of Detroit Mercy, University of Evansville, University of Findlay, University of Michigan, University of Michigan, Dearborn, University of Michigan, Flint, University of Notre Dame, University of Pennsylvania, University of Toronto, University of Vermont, Urbana University, Valparaiso University, Vanderbilt University, Vassar College, Wake Forest University,, Warren Wilson University, Washington & Lee University, Washtenaw Community College, Wayne State University, Western Michigan University

NACAC National College Fair, Thursday, March 31, 6:30-8:30, Burton Manor, Livonia

Purdue University's Junior Engineering Day, Monday, April 11, 8:00 AM+  www.purdue.edu/wiep

~~~~~~

Colleges & Programs 

Lawrence Tech Exploration Day, Friday, March 25, 8AM,  explorationday.ltu.edu

Aquinas College (MI) Business and Technology AQDay, Friday March 25, 8:30 AM+ aquinas.edu/undergraduate/tech_campus.html

Wayne State University's Preview Day: 3/27/11, 1-3 PM  preview.wayne.edu

Grove City College (PA) Crimson Day, Saturday, April 2   8:30 AM www.gcc.edu

*Grand Valley State University's Grand Tours, 4/8 or 4/15  www.gvsu.edu

Oakland University's Visit Day, 4/9/11, 9AM-2PM, oakland.edu/toursandevents

*Digital Media Arts College (FL) Open House, 4/16

*University of Michigan-Dearborn Maize and Blue Day, 4/16, 12:00 www.umd.umich.du/maizeandblue

*Wellesley College's  (MA) Junior Open House, Sat., 4/23, 8:30 AM  www.wellesley.edu/admission/joc

++++

The Best Advice When Colleges Say No                                                                                                                                            School counselors know the real March Madness begins next week, when some of the nation’s most selective colleges release their admissions decisions.  As a pre-game warm-up, let’s stick with the facts we’ll need to comfort the Class of 2011

    Most selective colleges are reporting a huge increase in the number of applications.

  • This increase is due in part to more American students applying to college, and colleges seeking out more students from overseas.
  • Since this also happened last year, many colleges enrolled too many students last fall.  They’ll have to make up for that, so many colleges will be admitting fewer students this year…
  • …and wait-listing more students.  This increase means fewer students will be admitted from the wait list come May—and if they are admitted, financial aid will be scarce.

 

If none of that does any good, then just say this: 850.

 

No, this is not the high score on some new version of the SAT, and while it may indeed be the number of times Charlie Sheen appeared on TV last week, that (happily) has nothing to do with college.

 

850 is the number of valedictorians rejected last year from one of America’s most prestigious colleges.  These students represented the best in their high schools; they did everything they were “supposed” to do—and yet, they didn’t even get to the wait list. 

 

Once you share this with your students, ask them how these 850 students felt when they were rejected.  Sooner or later, the right answer will come forward—“They probably felt like they put in all of that time and effort for nothing.”

 

And there is the teachable moment.

 

It had to be hard to be turned down by a school they loved—but did all of that preparation really lead to nothing?  Given everything these students had learned, the many ways they had grown, and how they overcame adversity and embraced creativity in making Plans B, C, and Q, did they really get nothing out of it?

 

If so, they have every right to be unhappy, but not with the college. They should be unhappy for letting the sun rise and set 1307 times from the first day of 9th grade to the day the college said no, never once appreciating all that each of those days had to offer in and of themselves. 

 

They should hang their heads a little to realize, just now, the difference they’ve made to their classmates, their teammates, and the people they served in the soup kitchen.

 

And if they look back with a little regret on the many times they blew off a compliment from a parent or a teacher because the goal of college wasn’t realized just yet, that’s more than OK.  They now know it was at that moment that the goal of fully living each day was conquered with a flourish—and understanding that will make each day all the richer at the wonderful college that had the good sense (and room) to take them.

 

It isn’t easy to watch wonderful students work through the dismay and disappointment college decisions can bring, but if we remember the most important part of our work has nothing to do with who gets in and everything to do with who gets it, the disappointment will fade faster than the memory of the teams we had in last year’s NCAA pool, and students can move forward with a better sense of who they are, and what really matters.  Now that’s college counseling.

Patrick J. O'Connor, Ph.D.


~~~~~


*Let Kids Rule the School

By SUSAN ENGEL, The New York Times
Published: March 14, 2011

IN a speech last week, President Obama said it was unacceptable that “as many as a quarter of American students are not finishing high school.” But our current educational approach doesn’t just fail to prepare teenagers for graduation or for college academics; it fails to prepare them, in a profound way, for adult life.

We want young people to become independent and capable, yet we structure their days to the minute and give them few opportunities to do anything but answer multiple-choice questions, follow instructions and memorize information. We cast social interaction as an impediment to learning, yet all evidence points to the huge role it plays in their psychological development.

That’s why we need to rethink the very nature of high school itself.

I recently followed a group of eight public high school students, aged 15 to 17, in western Massachusetts as they designed and ran their own school within a school. They represented the usual range: two were close to dropping out before they started the project, while others were honors students. They named their school the Independent Project.

Their guidance counselor was their adviser, consulting with them when the group flagged in energy or encountered an obstacle. Though they sought advice from English, math and science teachers, they were responsible for monitoring one another’s work and giving one another feedback. There were no grades, but at the end of the semester, the students wrote evaluations of their classmates.

The students also designed their own curriculum, deciding to split their September-to-January term into two halves.

During the first half, they formulated and then answered questions about the natural and social world, including “Are the plant cells at the bottom of a nearby mountain different than those at the top of the mountain?” and “Why we do we cry?” They not only critiqued one another’s queries, but also the answers they came up with. Along the way, they acquired essential tools of inquiry, like how to devise good methods for gathering various kinds of data.

During the second half, the group practiced what they called “the literary and mathematical arts.” They chose eight novels — including works by Kurt Vonnegut, William Faulkner and Oscar Wilde — to read in eight weeks. That is more than the school’s A.P. English class reads in an entire year.

Meanwhile, each of them focused on specific mathematical topics, from quadratic equations to the numbers behind poker. They sought the help of full-time math teachers, consulted books and online sources and, whenever possible, taught one another.

They also each undertook an “individual endeavor,” learning to play the piano or to cook, writing a novel or making a podcast about domestic violence. At the end of the term, they performed these new skills in front of the entire student body and faculty.

Finally, they embarked on a collective endeavor, which they agreed had to have social significance. Because they felt the whole experience had been so life-changing, they ended up making a film showing how other students could start and run their own schools.

The results of their experiment have been transformative. An Independence Project student who had once considered dropping out of school found he couldn’t bear to stop focusing on his current history question but didn’t want to miss out on exploring a new one. When he asked the group if it would be O.K. to pursue both, another student answered, “Yeah, I think that’s what they call learning.”

One student who had failed all of his previous math courses spent three weeks teaching the others about probability. Another said: “I did well before. But I had forgotten what I actually like doing.” They have all returned to the conventional curriculum and are doing well. Two of the seniors are applying to highly selective liberal arts colleges.

The students in the Independent Project are remarkable but not because they are exceptionally motivated or unusually talented. They are remarkable because they demonstrate the kinds of learning and personal growth that are possible when teenagers feel ownership of their high school experience, when they learn things that matter to them and when they learn together. In such a setting, school capitalizes on rather than thwarts the intensity and engagement that teenagers usually reserve for sports, protest or friendship.

Schools everywhere could initiate an Independent Project. All it takes are serious, committed students and a supportive faculty. These projects might not be exactly alike: students might apportion their time differently, or add another discipline to the mix. But if the Independent Project students are any indication, participants will end up more accomplished, more engaged and more knowledgeable than they would have been taking regular courses.

We have tried making the school day longer and blanketing students with standardized tests. But perhaps children don’t need another reform imposed on them. Instead, they need to be the authors of their own education.

Susan Engel is the author of “Red Flags or Red Herrings: Predicting Who Your Child Will Become.”

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2010-11 Testing Dates and Deadlines

ACT   The ACT Assessment Test assesses a high school student’s general educational development and their ability to complete college-level work. The multiple-choice tests cover four skill areas: English, Mathematics, Reading, and Science. The Writing Test, which is optional, measures skill in planning and writing a short essay. The ACT is generally taken by 11th Graders in the spring/summer of their Junior year of high school and by seniors retaking them to improve their scores. The ACT is also included as part of the Michigan Merit Examination (MME) and will be administered in school in March, 2011.http://www.actstudent.org

Test Date

Registration Deadline

April 9, 2011
March 4, 2011
June 11, 2011
May 6, 2011
 

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SAT

         The SAT Reasoning Test is a measure of the critical thinking skills students need   for academic success in college. The SAT is usually taken by 11th Graders in the spring of their Junior year in high school and retaken by seniors to improve their scores. Each section of the SAT is scored on a scale of 200-800, with two writing subscores for multiple-choice and the essay. 

2010-11 SAT National Test Dates     

Test Date

  Registration Deadline

 

May 7, 2011             April 8, 2011

June 4, 2011            May 6, 2011                                                                                                         


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News from PI High (Pioneer High, that is)

For more information about Ann Arbor Pioneer, see:  http://www.aaps.k12.mi.us/pioneer.home

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

The Rat Rap (Huron High, that is!)

 “Official Site”: http://www.aaps.k12.mi.us/huron.
 

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Rec. and Ed. Study Skills Programs for Winter 2011
 
ACT Preparation Workshop
Grades 10-12. Enrolling in the ACT Preparation Workshop helps you prepare to successfully take the ACT test. This workshop is for students taking the ACT during the remainder of the calendar year. The best method for scoring well on the ACT and replacing anxiety with confidence is to be knowledgeable and well prepared. Information and strategies for each section of the test are included. Bring a CALCULATOR and a WATCH WITH A SECOND HAND. A manual is provided for each participant as part of the fee. Scholarship recipients pay $20.  Instructor: Great Lakes Educational Group staff. 1 class.
ID# 1329.602  3/26   Saturday   FEE: $79  9:00 AM – 12 Noon   Tappan, Media Center


The Art of Writing a Winning College Application Essay
Parents and Students Grades 9-12. College admissions officers spend minutes reading   an essay, so how can yours be as impressive as Mt. Everest—strong and memorable—and not an anonymous anthill? Learn what admissions officers are looking for, how to bring out your unique writing voice, and engaging ways to emphasize your strengths without bragging.  Discuss and take home samples of winning essays.  Come to class with a notebook and optional essay drafts for feedback.  Expect to leave class energized, with a jumpstart on your essay. Instructor: Debbie Eisenberg Merion.  1 class.
ID# 1339.601
   3/23   Wednesday  FEE: $29  7:00 PM – 8:30 PM  Community, Room 213
 
Enroll online at aareced.com or call Ivy Juan at 734-994-2300 ext. 53248.
 
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 Community-Wide Events

The free Dawn Farm Education Series will present three very popular programs in March 2011, and you are invited!

Relapse Prevention March 15, 2011; 7:30 pm to 9:00 pm  PRESENTERS: Robin Edison, M.Ed., LPC, NCC, CAAC; Coordinator, Dawn Farm Downtown program. The relapse process begins before alcohol/other drug use resumes. This program will discuss the dynamics of relapse, the warning signs that lead the chemically dependent person into a relapse, and strategies to prevent relapse and handle high-risk situations. 


Codependency:   March 22, 2011; 7:30 pm to 9:00 pm 
PRESENTER: Ronald E. Harrison; Chemical Dependency Therapist 
This program will discuss the symptoms and progression of codependency and describe actions and resources that help codependent people to recovery from codependency. 

Spirituality and Recovery From Addiction 
DATE/TIME: March 29, 2011; 7:30 pm to 9:00 pm 
PRESENTER: Edward Conlin, BSEd, CAC-R; Addiction Counselor, Detroit Capuchin Service System. 
This program will describe how spirituality relates to recovery from chemical dependency, explore personal spiritual needs and life choices, and discuss the Twelve Steps as a spiritual program which can benefit anyone (recovering or not.) 

All programs are presented in the St. Joseph Mercy Hospital Education Center auditorium at 5305 Elliott Drive, Ypsilanti.  All programs are FREE and open to all. People in recovery, people interested in recovery, family members and friends, people who work with individuals who are affected by chemical dependency, students, and anyone interested in attending for any reason are all welcome! No registration is required. Each program is approved by the Michigan Certification Board for Addiction Professionals (MCBAP) to provide 1.5 free CE hours. A certificate to document attendance for CE or other purposes will be provided on request.

 

We'd like to invite you to attend, and we will be grateful for your help in informing others about these programs! A schedule of all presentations, further details, directions to the Education Center, and a flier can be accessed from Dawn Farm's Web site at http://www.dawnfarm.org/programs/education-series. You can also contact us at the Farm for further information: 734/485-8725, or info@dawnfarm.org.

 ~~~~~~

Acing the ACT/SAT: Spring 2011Test Preparation Sessions

www.managingyourmind.com

It’s Not Too Late to Get the Score You Want!

 ACT Test Date April 9, 2011:

Wed., March 23 & Wed., April 6, 2011. 6:30 – 8:00 pm, $90

 ACT Test Date June 11, 2011:

Thurs., May 19, Thurs., May 26, Thurs., June 2, & Thurs., June 9, 2011.

6:30 – 8:00 pm, $180

 SAT Test Date May 7, 2011:

Wed., April 20 & Wed., April 27, 2011. 6:30 -  8:00 pm, $90.

 

SAT Test Date June 4, 2011:

Wed., May 11, Wed., May 18, Wed., May 25, & Wed., June 1, 2011.

6:30 - 8:00 pm, $180.

 

Topics:

Time Management/Organization, Test Preparation/Study,  

Reading Section,  Writing Section, Test Stress 


 
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1/2 Price Tickets for University Musical Society concerts are available to high school students. A limited number of tickets are available for events 90 minutes before the concert time at the performance auditorium if the concert is NOT sold out. Tickets are sold on a first come, first served basis. Students must have a valid student I.D. and seating is assigned. Call 764-2538 to check ticket availability.http://www.ums.org/secondary/education/pub_prog_teens.htm

+++++++++++++++++

Ann Arbor Civic Theater offers special student rates. All student tickets to all performances are only $10-12! Tickets are available in advance or at the door. Schedule is at http://www.a2ct.org.



***********

Selective Service Information: For 17 and 18 year old men, federal law requires that you register with Selective Service within 30 days of your 18th birthday. When register, you stay eligible for federal student loans, federal job training and jobs. You may register at http://www.sss.gov or at the post office.

   

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826 Michigan

TUTORING Drop-in tutoring does not need to be registered for, you just drop-in. Free tutoring is offered Mon. - Thurs. from 3:30 - 5:30 at 826's location of E. Liberty, behind the Robot Store.  The winter session begins Mon., Jan. 10. Students   8 - 18 may drop in any time to get help with any subject.

Students must show up to drop-in tutoring with homework or other assignments in hand. Drop-in tutoring encourages smiling, feeling good about oneself, grades going up, enthusiasm toward learning, and positivity. The intention of drop-in tutoring is to mentor, listen to, and help students with their homework needs.
Contact  amy@826michigan.org
phone:734.761.3463 http://www.826michigan.org

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The Neutral Zone  The Neutral Zone is a diverse, youth-driven teen center dedicated to promoting personal growth through artistic expression, community leadership and the exchange of ideas. Why would 3500 teens visit Neutral Zone in a month? Programs, programs, programs (and sometimes pizza – you just can’t go wrong with pizza!)

NZ Program Areas include:

Music & Technology
NZ holds weekend concerts and events for teens most Saturday nights. Teens also create, record and promote their own musical projects using NZ’s equipment and expertise.

Education
 Neutral Zone works hard to level the playing field for all teens through free drop-in tutoring, one-on-one mentoring, and a college prep program featuring college visits, ACT/SAT preparation, coaching on applications, essay writing, and financial aid, and opportunities for scholarships.

Literary & Visual Arts
Creative writers turn up the volume by writing original poetry and short stories, while photographers and videographers discover and explore their talents using state-of-the-art equipment in digital art classes.



Leadership
The Teen Advisory Council runs the show at Neutral Zone, while several different discussion groups offer young people an open, positive space to explore sensitive issues and just plain have fun together.

Drop-in
Teens come to NZ daily to shoot pool, play ping pong, use the internet, do homework, grab something to eat,or just hang out with friends in a safe, supervised space. For General Questions Contact, Lori Roddy,lori@neutral-zone.org734-214-9995

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News from Join Together: Communities and Families Working Together
http://www.jointogether.org

Monitoring the Future' Finds More Teens Using Marijuana While Alcohol Use Continues Decline

by Rachel Hassinger  | 

 Daily use of marijuana has increased among eighth, tenth, and twelfth grade youth, while alcohol use -- at its lowest level since the survey began -- and binge drinking have continued long-term declines, according to 2010 Monitoring the Future Survey (MTF) results released today.

MTF, an annual survey funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), has measured self-reported drug use behavior and attitudes among high-school seniors since 1975 and among eighth and tenth graders since 1991.

Researchers, led by Lloyd Johnston at the University of Michigan's Institute for Social Research, surveyed 46,482 eighth, tenth, and twelfth grade students in 396 public and independent schools across the country.

Prevalence measures of marijuana use rose in all three grade levels (measures included daily, past 30 days, past year, and lifetime use). When researchers combined data for all three grades, the one-year increases in marijuana use in all prevalence measures were statistically significant.

"Though this upward shift is not yet very large, its duration and pervasiveness leave no doubt in our minds that it is real," said Johnston. "Perhaps the most troublesome part of it is that daily use of marijuana increased significantly in all three grades in 2010."

From 2009 to 2010, daily marijuana-use rates increased from 1.0 to 1.2 percent for eighth graders, 2.8 to 3.3 percent for tenth graders, and from 5.2 to 6.1 percent for twelfth graders. That means that about one in every 16 high-school seniors who were surveyed self-reported daily use of marijuana.

Researchers defined daily use as using a drug 20 or more times in the last 30 days.

"These high rates of marijuana use during the teen and pre-teen years, when the brain continues to develop, place our young people at particular risk," said Nora D. Volkow, M.D, director of NIDA. "Not only does marijuana affect learning, judgment, and motor skills, but research tells us that about 1 in 6 people who start using it as adolescents become addicted."

The perceived risk of using marijuana, including risk of daily use, declined in all three grades.

"The increases in youth drug use reflected in the Monitoring the Future Study are disappointing. And mixed messages about drug legalization, particularly marijuana legalization, may be to blame," said Gil Kerlikowske, director of the White   House Office of National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP). "Such messages certainly don’t help parents who are trying to prevent young people from using drugs."

While overall illicit drug use has gradually increased over the past three years among all three grades, it appears that most of the increase was due to marijuana. Illicit drug use, other than marijuana, has stalled after some years of declining.

One exception is ecstasy, which gained in popularity among eighth and tenth graders.

"There may well be a generational forgetting of the dangers of ecstasy as newer cohorts of youth enter adolescence. They have heard less about the dangers of the drug than did their predecessors," said Johnston, "because they were quite young when the original ecstasy epidemic occurred." 

Meanwhile, alcohol use continued a long-term decline since 1980s. Alcohol use among all three grades decreased. In fact, the rate of alcohol use among twelfth graders is the lowest ever (since the study began in 1975), and the lowest among eighth and tenth graders since 1991 (when those grades were added). 

Binge drinking -- defined in the survey as five or more drinks in one sitting within the past two weeks -- among twelfth graders declined significantly from 25.2 percent in 2009 to 23.2 percent in 2010. Occasions of heavy drinking declined among eighth and tenth graders, too, but the decrease was not statistically significant.

Use of flavored alcoholic beverages -- a measure added since 2004 -- has declined, although the percentage was not statistically significant. However, researchers noted, the "flavored alcohol beverage" category did not include alcoholic energy drinks.

Although past-30-days cigarette use among twelfth graders dropped below past-30-days marijuana use (19.2 percent and 21.4 percent, respectively), declines in overall cigarette use have stalled in all three grades.

Check out the links below for drug-by-drug information -- including trends of teen prescription and over-the-counter drug use.

 
~~~~~~~~~~

Good Smile

Why is the third hand on a watch called the second hand?


 &&&&&&&&&&&&&


 

Submissions:
Please submit your articles, news, or announcements by TUESDAY noon to boshoven@aaps.k12.mi.us. John B. Boshoven, Editor.

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